Spying and Sabotage inside India by China and Pakistan !

Discussion in 'Internal Security' started by hit&run, Feb 2, 2011.

  1. hit&run

    hit&run Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2009
    Messages:
    5,498
    Likes Received:
    4,679
    Rather having many threads each time and due to increase frequency of such revealtion in recent past I would like to request mods to make sticky of above title heading. I think ths will cover all the news article and discussions related to Chinese and Pakistani covert operations and support to diffrent insurgent groups inside India.

    I wont mind if the title is changed (to make it more appropriate) but it should serve the concerns of India pertaining to this particular Issue.

    http://www.outlookindia.com/article.aspx?270223


    [​IMG]
    China Hand in India
    The Great Claw of China
    The confessions of NSCN(IM) leader Anthony Shimray show exactly how China is fuelling India’s northeastern insurgencies
    Saikat Datta

    China Hand in India
    Common Cause With Deadly Purpose
    Two unrelated events point to possible links between Maoists and northeastern outfits

    Remote Control Rebels
    Why China’s meddling in the Northeast should worry Delhi
    Ajit Doval
    Diplomacy
    A Mandarin Riddle
    Foreign policy experts are more guarded on China's 'mischief'
    Pranay Sharma ​


    Wooing NSCN (IM)
    • China agrees to host a permanent representative of the NSCN (IM) from 2008
    • The outfit is asked to spy on Indian troops in Arunachal Pradesh and the Dalai Lama
    • Pakistan’s ISI also contacts NSCN (IM) and asks it to break the ceasefire with India
    • NSCN (IM)’s firepower grows significantly during the ceasefire with India that began in 1995
    For decades, India and China have played a cat-and-mouse game, full of intrigue and suspense. Even while New Delhi is trying to find ways around vexatious border issues or making occasional noises about stapled visas, Beijing has been secretly supporting, advising and arming major insurgent outfits in India’s troubled Northeast and the Maoist belt. Unlike the noise and heat the Indo-Pak relationship generates, Indian diplomats maintain a studied silence when it comes to the Chinese hand in the Northeast or arms from across the border reaching Maoists in central India.
    In the last three months, however, the Chinese hand in the Northeast has been revealed in great detail. In the early hours of October 2 last year, Indian intelligence officials, along with their counterparts in the National Investigation Agency, accosted a tall, hefty man waiting outside the Patna railway station. The quarry was Anthony Shimray, a key official of the National Socialist Council of Nagalim (Isak-Muivah) faction or NSCN(IM), the biggest insurgent outfit in the Northeast. Not only is Shimray a powerful member of the NSCN(IM)’s top leadership, he is also the nephew of its general secretary, T. Muivah, currently in New Delhi for peace talks with the Centre. As the chief arms procurer for the outfit, Shimray also has first-hand information on Chinese efforts to support insurgencies.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Shimray: Tailed and Nabbed
    Shimray’s early morning arrest was the culmination of a meticulous operation conducted by India’s external intelligence agency RAW in the preceding weeks. They had managed to track down Shimray in the middle of September. He was operating out of Bangkok, a haven for arms dealers, insurgents and intelligence agencies. It was to be a tricky call: Shimray could not be nabbed in a foreign land, and there was considerable debate within the government on picking him up since this was in the midst of a dialogue with NSCN(IM). Finally, with clearance, intelligence officials had a stroke of luck.
    By the end of September, the sleuths had gathered from their sources that Shimray would need to travel from Thailand to get his visa renewed and visit his cadres in Manipur and Nagaland. Quietly, they managed to procure his travel details to Nepal and began to monitor his exit from Bangkok. Shimray took a Royal Nepal Airlines flight to Kathmandu in the early hours of September 27 and proceeded by road to quietly slip across the Indian border into Bihar. From here, he was to proceed by rail to the Northeast but he was arrested before that.
    His subsequent interrogation has been detailed in a 100-page report, accessed exclusively by Outlook. It throws up several startling truths about the Chinese hand in Indian insurgencies. While Shimray speaks at length about NSCN(IM), he also reveals China’s links with ULFA and the National Democratic Front of Bodoland (NDFB) in Assam and the United National Liberation Front in Manipur. Here are Shimray’s key revelations:
    [​IMG]
    Paresh Barua at an ULFA training camp near China-Myanmar border. (Photograph by U B Photos, From Outlook, February 07, 2011)​
    Chinese Arms for the Northeast
    Even as recently as September 25, 2010, Shimray was procuring arms and had held further talks with his middleman in Bangkok, Willy Narue. One consignment being negotiated was for Arunachal Pradesh. He even asked the suppliers if they could deliver in the “upper part of Arunachal from the Chinese side”. Investigators feel Shimray’s covert October trip to India may have been tied to the arms deals.
    Shimray also told his interrogators how he procured arms from the Chinese in late 2007. “It was decided by our leadership stationed in New Delhi to strengthen the weaponry of the organisation,” he reveals. With Narue’s help, he contacted Yuthuna, a Chinese representative of TCL in Bangkok, TCL being the “authorised subsidiary of the Chinese arms company China Xinshidai, Beijing”. On its website, Xinshidai is described as dealing in the import and export of specialised products by China’s defence industries.
    The final shopping list included 600 AK series rifles, nearly 6 lakh ammunition rounds, 200 sub-machine guns, pistols, rocket launchers, light machine guns and 200 kg of RDX. The deal was worth $1.2 million, with an additional $1 million for shipment from China. The consignment was sent through a shipping agent in Kittichai of Bangkok-based Intermarine Shipping. It was to be “loaded from Beihei, a south Chinese port. The destination was Cox’s Bazaar”, a major landing station on the Bangladesh coast. “All the correspondence with Willy Narue, our leadership in New Delhi, Nagaland and others in Thailand and China,” Shimray says, “was made on e-mail to maintain the secrecy of the entire project.” The information was saved as a draft and accessed by Chinese intelligence using Shimray’s password.
    Shimray also recalled his visit to China in 1994 for a joint arms deal for NDFB. The “procurement of the arms and ammunition” was “made from the Chinese company NORINCO”. This consignment included “1,800 pieces of arms and one lakh rounds, which included AK series rifles, M16 automatic assault rifles, machine guns, sniper rifles, rocket launchers and pistols”. The money came from a Naga businessman using Calcutta-based hawala operators.
    Again, in 1996, “arms and ammunition were brought from Beijing to Cox’s Bazaar in a North Korean ship”. After the consignment was unloaded in small boats on the high seas and transferred in trucks to NSCN(IM) camps in Bangladesh, it travelled to the Northeast.
    China Hosts Permanent Representative of NSCN(IM)
    In another significant revelation, Shimray details how China’s relationship with the NSCN(IM) was strengthened in 2008 when it agreed to host their permanent representative. The year also seems to have been a watershed moment in the NSCN(IM)’s relationship with China and its renewed efforts to arm itself. And ironically, in the midst of a 15-year-dialogue it has been having with New Delhi.
    According to Shimray, in a letter from ‘Prime Minister’ Muivah addressed to senior Chinese intelligence officials, Kholose Swu Sumi, a 60-year-old member of the Sema tribe in the Zunheboto district of Nagaland, was appointed as the permanent representative of the NSCN(IM) in China. Kholose’s acceptance by the Chinese was an official acknowledgement of a formal relationship with the NSCN(IM). Kholose was promoted to the rank of a colonel and asked to interface with the Chinese. “His main job was to update the Chinese authorities about the development of peace talks and the activities of the Indian army and to pass on the response of the Chinese authorities to the collective leadership of NSCN(IM),” says the interrogation report recording Shimray’s confessions.
    Kholose, who ran a business in precious stones, received Shimray and his wife at Kunming airport (Yunnan province, southeastern China) on a visit and introduced him to several Chinese intelligence officials. “He introduced me to Mr Chang, head of intelligence of the region in Dehong Mangshi,” Shimray told his interrogators. “Mr Lee Wuen, head of intelligence of Yunnan province, was also introduced to me. I gave them the message of our leadership, that NSCN(IM) wanted their assistance and cooperation.”
    [​IMG]
    Suspicious lensmen Chinese nationals arrested by the UP police in January​
    Forging Military Cooperation and Spying on India
    Shimray also talks of a visit to China in the summer of 2009. This time, he accompanied his ‘President’, Isak Chisi Swu. “The visa for the visit,” says Shimray, “was arranged by the Chinese intelligence authorities at the Chinese embassy in the Philippines.” The trip helped the NSCN(IM) leadership forge “military cooperation” with the Chinese. But, “in lieu of extending military cooperation,” says Shimray, the NSCN(IM) was to “give information on the movement and activities of the Dalai Lama in India and the movement and facilities of (the) Indian army in Arunachal Pradesh”.



    An ISI agent codenamed Mr Rex offered NSCN leadership financial aid as well as military training.

    NSCN(IM) cadres in the border district of Tirap in Arunachal Pradesh began to immediately monitor Indian troop movements. Shimray contacted a Naga journalist in Delhi, paid her Rs 80,000, and persuaded her to travel to Dharamsala, the headquarters of the Dalai Lama, to gather intelligence. “For getting information on the movements and activities of the army in Arunachal Pradesh, we collected the information through our cadres in Tirap district and our New Delhi office,” Shimray told the investigators. “I passed on this information to an official of the Chinese intelligence agency.”
    In his reports to Chinese intelligence, Shimray would use code words such as “Awo” to designate China and “Mayang” for India. He also conveyed the information using the e-mail id angel3phi@ yahoo.com, which would be accessed by a Chinese intelligence officer using the same password. While Shimray was in constant touch with the Chinese, other senior NSCN leaders such as ‘deputy minister’ Kehoi too were making contacts with Chinese authorities. In addition, NSCN(IM) commander-in-chief V.S. Atem also had some Chinese contacts.
    Interestingly, the Uttar Pradesh police arrested three Chinese citizens in January who had illegally crossed into India and were found photographing border check-posts. In the same month, a 39-year-old Chinese woman, Wang Qing, was arrested and deported after she illegally travelled to Nagaland and also met Muivah. She was reported to be from the People’s Security Bureau, the Chinese intelligence agency.

    ISI Links
    In a subsequent interrogation, Shimray also gives interesting insights into his relationship with Pakistan’s ISI which tried to engage with the northeastern insurgents on several occasions. The NSCN(IM) leadership was received by “the Pakistani intelligence officials” in Karachi way back in 2001 even as the NSCN(IM) was negotiating peace with New Delhi. In 2008, an ISI agent working under the pseudonym of “Mr Rex” and stationed in Bangladesh visited the NSCN(IM) leadership in Bangkok and offered “financial help as well as military training” if the Nagas broke the ceasefire with India.
    It is, however, the China factor that continues to be a major irritant for New Delhi even as peace talks continue with the Nagas. It has already expressed its displeasure at China’s stapled visas to Kashmiris and Arunachalis, its denial of a visa to an Indian army general and its efforts to arm and support the insurgency in the Northeast. The balance of power between the elephant and the dragon, it seems, will continue to oscillate before it can stabilise.
     
    happy and S.A.T.A like this.
  2.  
  3. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    2,783
    Location:
    Gangtok, Sikkim, India
    And we have a stupid government that is trying to make a fictitious terrorism real while these enemies eat up the country. :doh:
     
  4. anoop_mig25

    anoop_mig25 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    Messages:
    5,195
    Likes Received:
    2,223
    this stupid ediois norteast terrorist why donot understand that once they get so called freedom form indian there land would be captured by china in name of promoting peace
     
  5. Patriot

    Patriot Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2010
    Messages:
    1,760
    Likes Received:
    538
    Location:
    Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India
    Is China Backing Indian Insurgents?

    The arrest in January of a Chinese spy who allegedly met insurgents in the northeast of the country suggests a broader effort to destabilize India.

    [​IMG]

    On January 25, 2011, Wang Qing, a Chinese spy disguised as a TV reporter, was arrested and deported after she reportedly visited the headquarters of the National Socialist Council of Nagalim (Isak-Muivah) or NSCN-IM—one of India’s largest and most troublesome insurgent groups. Indian authorities said Qing admitted to being a spy for the People's Security Bureau, a Chinese intelligence agency, and that she had conducted a secretive four-hour-long, closed-door meeting with Thuingaleng Muivah, a key rebel leader of the NSCN-IM who is currently holding reconciliation talks with the Indian government. The rebel group, however, insisted that it was holding talks with the Indian Government in good faith and that it hashad ‘no relations with China.’

    While the news attracted little attention, it’s hard to see the incident as inconsequential for Sino-Indian relations, as it suggests potential links between China’s intelligence agencies with insurgent groups in India’s volatile Northeast region. More worrisome for New Delhi, though, is the fact that Qing’s case is only one of several recently that suggest an attempt by Beijing to step up efforts at undermining peace and increasing leverage over India as both countries grapple with sensitive border negotiations.

    Such dealings were recently revealed in detail in a 100-page Indian government report, accessed and revealed by Outlook India. The report pertains to the October 2010 arrest by Indian authorities of Anthony Shimray, a key official and major arms procurer of the NSCN-IM, who had been operating out of Bangkok. During his interrogation, the report alleged that the NSCN-IM was offered the chance to purchase surface-to-air missiles (SAMs) by Chinese agents working on behalf of the Chinese intelligence agencies.

    The negotiations for the deal reportedly took place in Chengdu in December 2009, with the agents asking $1 million for the missiles as part of a package that included training the rebels in the technical know-how to use them. However, the deal reportedly fell through as the rebel groups couldn’t raise the money. Shimray also admitted that in return for Chinese support, Naga insurgents had been giving away details of Indian army deployments in the China-India border region of Twang in Arunachal Pradesh, including positions of Indian aircraft and missiles.

    If substantiated, Shimray’s revelations would mark for Indian officials a clear and troubling increase in covert Chinese intelligence activity in India’s internal affairs. China has maintained that it doesn’t interfere in India’s internal affairs, adhering closely to the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence—a series of agreements in 1954 put forward by Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai governing relations with India. But China also remains deeply distrustful of Indian intentions along the sensitive southern tip of the Sino-Indian border, and may perceive India’s complex web of insurgent groups in that area as an opportunity to undermine India’s grip on power there.

    China and Naga Rebels


    The National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN) was formed in the early 1980s by Isak Chisi Swu, Thuingaleng Muivah, and S.S. Khaplang in a sign of displeasure with the terms of the Shillong Accord, signed by the then Naga National Council (NNC) with the government of India. Differences later surfaced within the organization over the issue of initiating dialogue with the Indian government. As a result, the NSCN split into two factions in 1988—the NSCN-K in honour of its leader, Khaplang, and the NSCN-IM, led by Isak and Muivah.

    The NSCN-IM has a reported strength of around 4,500 fighters and is believed to raise funds primarily through drug trafficking from Burma and by selling weapons and other military equipment to other regional insurgent groups. Nagas live in several states besides their own, Nagaland, and have fought a six-decade insurgency for an autonomous ‘Greater Nagaland’ including parts of Manipur, Assam, and Arunachal Pradesh. An estimated 100,000 people have died in violence tied to that conflict. A ceasefire with the government has largely held since 1997, but successive rounds of peace talks have yet to produce lasting results.

    Chinese support for Naga rebels isn’t a new phenomenon. Following the 1962 Indo-China conflict, and facilitated by Pakistani intelligence in Dacca, Kughato Sukhai, the self-proclaimed Naga prime minister, wrote to Chinese leaders alleging persecution and oppression by India and called on China to ‘honour and follow their principle of safeguarding and upholding the cause of any suppressed nation of Mongolian stock.’

    In November 1966, China covertly trained and procured weapons for a 300-strong contingent of Naga rebels in support of Maoist revolution. The group returned to India in January 1968 and established a huge camp in the Jotsoma jungles. When Indian forces attacked their haven in June that year, they reportedly recovered Chinese weapons and a trail of documents leading back to Chinese support. China apparently curtailed support for Indian insurgents starting in the late 1980s following Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi’s 1988 visit to China. However, the Indian military has strongly suspected that Chinese intelligence agencies have in fact been continuing to support Indian rebels covertly, although until recently it had little evidence to prove this.

    An Intelligence Windfall


    Shimray’s arrest proved to be a windfall for Indian intelligence, which had been pursuing him for years. Indian authorities reportedly caught a break in September 2010 when Shimray’s whereabouts were traced to Bangkok. However, under international law, they couldn’t arrest him until he set foot in Indian territory. A tip came that Shimray would need to travel from Thailand to get his visa renewed and visit his interlocutors in Manipur and Nagaland, but would first have to pass through Nepal. On September 27, Shimray took a Royal Nepal Airlines flight to Kathmandu and made his way across the Indian border into Bihar, where Indian authorities arrested him at a rail station.

    During his interrogation, Indian intelligence officials were said to have been shocked at the breadth and complexity of apparent ties revealed between Chinese intelligence and NSCN-IM operatives, in many cases utilizing a vast network of front companies and middlemen in Nepal, Bangladesh, Thailand, and North Korea. Shimray revealed that he first visited China in 1994 as part of a joint arms deal with the Indian insurgent group National Democratic Front of Bodoland (NDFB).

    The procurement of the arms and ammunition was made from the Chinese civil-defence company NORINCO (Beifang Gongye), and included 1,800 pieces of arms, AK series rifles, M16 automatic assault rifles, machine guns, sniper rifles, and rocket launchers. The money is said to have come from a Naga businessman using Calcutta-based operators. In 1996, another purchase of arms and ammunition was reportedly made that involved a shipment from Beijing to the fishing town of Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh using a North Korean ship as the transport vehicle. After the shipment was unloaded in small boats on the high seas and transferred in trucks in Bangladesh, it eventually made its way to the NSCM-IM headquarters in India.

    One individual in particular—a middleman in Bangkok named Willy Narue—was thought to be a key interlocutor who brokered many of the subsequent arms sales. With Narue’s help, Shimray had reportedly procured arms from the Chinese in late 2007 after it was decided by NSCN-IM leadership in New Delhi to strengthen the weaponry of the organization. Narue facilitated contact between Shimray and an individual by the name of ‘Yuthuna’ in Bangkok, who was a Chinese representative of ‘TCL’—an authorized subsidiary of the Chinese arms company China Xinshidai.

    According to its website, Xinshidai ‘deals in import and export of specialized products produced by China’s defence industries and general civilian products. ’The purchase included 600 AK series rifles, 6 Lakh ammunition rounds, 200 sub-machine guns, pistols, rocket launchers, light machine guns,and 200 kilograms of RDX (an explosive compound used in making bombs). Valued at an estimated $1.2 million, the shipment was to be loaded from a port in Beihei, China, and sent through a shipping agent of Bangkok-based Intermarine Shipping with the final destination of Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh. Correspondence was supposedly facilitated using a single email account whose username and password information was shared among Willy Narue, Naga leadership in New Delhi and Nagaland, and Chinese intelligence operatives.

    Even as recently as last September—just weeks before he was arrested—Shimray was said to be procuring arms, and reportedly had held further talks with Willy Narue. One such purchase being negotiated was to be delivered to Arunachal Pradesh. He even asked the suppliers if they could deliver in the ‘upper part of Arunachal from the Chinese side.’ Investigators strongly suspect Shimray’s covert October trip to India may have been tied to the arms deals.

    So why the tight relations between China and the NSCN-IM? One factor is said to be the revelation that China had agreed to host a permanent NSCN-IM representative based out of Kunming, Yunnan Province, in 2008. According to Shimray, Muivah had written a letter to senior Chinese intelligence officials to formally appoint Kholose Swu Sumi, a 60-year-old member of the Sema tribe of Nagaland, as the permanent representative of the NSCN-IM in China, which the Chinese accepted. Kholose is said then to have become the key point man for the NSCN-IM in China, meeting regularly with Chinese officials to keep them apprised of peace talk developments in India and relaying information from NSCN-IM operatives about the Indian army along the Sino-Indian border.

    Kholose, who was reportedly the owner of a precious stones business, received Shimray and his wife at Kunming airport on a visit and introduced him to several Chinese intelligence officials, including a man by the name of Mr. Chang, the head of intelligence of the region in Dehong Prefecture in Western Yunnan. Shimray also apparently met with Lee Wuen, head of intelligence of Yunnan Province, to relay the message that the NSCN-IM wanted their assistance and cooperation.

    There are several possible motivations for China supporting the NSCN-IM beyond just arms sales. For one, Nagaland straddles Arunachal Pradesh, an area over which both China and India claim sovereignty. For decades, the two militaries have been involved in a cat-and-mouse game along this sensitive border area, each trying to stake a claim along the Line of Actual Control (LAC). By infiltrating an area of strategic sensitivity for India, China could be aiming to secure a bargaining chip in border negotiation talks. Moreover, China is increasingly wary of India’s rise and larger geostrategic intentions as a peer competitor. Thus, Naga rebels offer China a convenient counterweight to India’s efforts at consolidating power and governance in northeast India, giving Beijing the ability to frustrate and distract New Delhi as it struggles to rein in the various insurgent groups that have proliferated inside its borders.

    This is of particular importance now as the two countries continue to try to resolve their border dispute. Since the early 1990s, Beijing and New Delhi have been locked in seemingly intractable border negotiations that have become something of a litmus test for whether the two aspiring powers can cooperate. If the claims of arms sales to the NSCN-IM in return for intelligence gathering of Indian troops turn out to be true, New Delhi can justifiably argue that Beijing isn’t conducting border negotiations in good faith.

    The scope and scale of Chinese ties with the NSCN-IM should give New Delhi pause as it pursues closer relations with Beijing, because they could imply a willingness on the part of Chinese intelligence to covertly undermine peace negotiations between the NSCN-IM and the Indian government while simultaneously acquiring potentially useful information about Indian troop movements along the Sino-Indian border.

    Until recently, it appears that China was able to surreptitiously sell arms to insurgents, exchange funds through neutral countries and plead plausible deniability when Indian authorities investigated such dealings. Beijing would simply say the weapons were procured from unscrupulous Chinese weapons manufacturers on the black market with links to rebel groups in Pakistan, Burma, or Bangladesh, thereby disavowing any direct knowledge or involvement. Shimray’s revelations, if proven true, would certainly make any such subterfuge far more difficult.



    Lyle Morris is an independent China analyst. His work has appeared in publications including China Brief, YaleGlobal Online and China Economist.
     
    S.A.T.A and hit&run like this.
  6. chex3009

    chex3009 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2010
    Messages:
    915
    Likes Received:
    161
    Location:
    IL
  7. Patriot

    Patriot Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2010
    Messages:
    1,760
    Likes Received:
    538
    Location:
    Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India
    Chex, I got it today itself on Diplomat link is given. The one you posted is different one. Anyway thanks mate.


    MODs, if same is not complying. please delete my post. Thanks
     
  8. JAYRAM

    JAYRAM 2 STRIKE CORPS Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    313
    Location:
    North Frontier, The Mighty Himalaya's
    Chinese army supplying T-81 rifles, IEDs to ULFA

    NEW DELHI: Sources have told TIMES NOW that ULFA's anti-talks faction is regrouping along with other rebel groups with the help of China. China backs ULFA's resurgence, arms insurgents. Sources said Chinese PLA is arming ULFA with T-81 rifles. It is also said that Chinese army is also supplying ULFA with IEDs.

    War games

    In what could be called China's nefarious plans, it is now trying to build two fronts of aggression against India. On the western side, less 25 km from Jaisalmer, Bikaner border, China has just launched joint war games with Pakistan. The second fight is on the eastern border.

    Top Army sources have told TIMES NOW that the presence of Chinese troops could be a sign of requirement of military engineering acumen. It is indicated by sources that the Army is aware of earlier reports of Chinese miltary presence in Gilgit. Sources said that with military ties with United States deteriorating, China will fulfill Pakistan's military requirement in terms of new weapons.

    Top sources in the government have told the channel that on strategic issues, China and Pakistan are together, especially so after the recent rift between America and Pakistan. Sources have also said that while America will never abandon Pakistan, the ties between the two countries are clearly not in a good shape.


    Chinese army supplying IEDs to ULFA - The Times of India
     
  9. hit&run

    hit&run Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2009
    Messages:
    5,498
    Likes Received:
    4,679
    China helping Pak route fake Indian currency

    New Delhi: In what could turn out to be a major cause of concern for India, intelligence reports suggest that China is emerging as a possible source and channel for fake Indian currency notes.

    According to a report accessed by a newspaper, fake currency worth crores is being sent via "staging posts" and "distribution networks (which) have been established in China," and six other nations.

    The report was prepared on March 17, 2011, by compiling key inputs from intelligence agencies such as the RAW, IB, DRI as well as investigative agencies like the CBI.

    Importantly, Nepal officials had recently nabbed two persons, including a Pakistani national, with fake Indian currency notes worth Rs 5.49 million.


    The report further claimed that fake notes were printed in Pakistan and then sent to countries like China, which were further sent to "wholesale" agents in India.

    Fake currency pumped into India as "policy matter": Pranab

    In a veiled reference to Pakistan, Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee yesterday said pumping of counterfeit currency is used as a "policy matter" by some countries to destabilise the Indian economy.

    Responding to concerns of members in the Rajya Sabha over the problem of counterfeit currency notes, Mukherjee said it was a serious threat.

    Winding up a debate on Coinage Bill, he said it was a battle the government has to fight continuously as some countries are using it as a potential tool to destabilise the Indian economy.

    "Sometimes it is used as a policy matter. I do not want to use the names of the country. Everybody is aware of...what their objective is," he said.

    Though the Finance Minister did not name any country, concerns have often been expressed over fake currency coming from Pakistan routed through Nepal.

    He, however, said the counterfeit currency of the face value of only Rs 26.95 crore was detected in the calendar 2010, against Rs 23.01 crore in the previous year. Up to June in the current calendar, fake currency with face value of Rs 10.62 crore has been detected.

    He said eight out of every one million notes are counterfeit, even as the members in the Rajya Sabha pointed to the widespread problem, especially in areas bordering with Nepal and Bhutan.
     
    venkat likes this.
  10. agentperry

    agentperry Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2010
    Messages:
    3,022
    Likes Received:
    678
    Location:
    delhi
    well these operations are done covertly without much fanfare. govt makes releases only when media sniffs it. moreover north east movements are weak if not dead. but yes indian govt not replying in eye for an eye manner is disappointing because india-china/pak are rival enemy and such hypocrisy is not desirable.
     
  11. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    2,783
    Location:
    Gangtok, Sikkim, India
    ART OF WAR, my friend. ART OF WAR. As I said, Chinese speak the double language. It is an inherent lesson they learnt from general Sun Tzu. These politicians won't give a damn and will never realize the threat from CCP. Sometimes it is us Indians of the bordering states that have to be prepared for any eventuality.
     

Share This Page