Scientists Make Sea Water Drinkable, Produce 6.3 Million Litres A Day

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Indx TechStyle, May 7, 2016.

  1. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    Scientists Make Sea Water Drinkable, Produce 6.3 Million Litres A Day
    Story Highlights
    • Pilot plant to convert sea water is at Tamil Nadu's Kalpakkam
    • Plant has a capacity to produce 6.3 million litres of fresh water a day
    • The fresh water currently being is used at the Kudankulam nuclear reactor
    [​IMG]
    Prime Minister Narendra Modi, during his visit to the centre, examines the cycle fitted with a water purifier.
    @Gessler @Superdefender @Navnit Kundu @Mikesingh @Bornubus
     
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  3. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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  4. Navnit Kundu

    Navnit Kundu Pika Hu Akbarrr!! Senior Member

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    An Indian guy in Murica has done something similar, I mean, the core tech isn't exactly earth shattering but his design is based on osmotic desalination as opposed to the nuclear plant's distillation method. He has made a complete presentation claiming that 20 of his portable machines can be floated on the sea to meet the water needs of a typical metro city.

     
  5. Bornubus

    Bornubus Senior Member Senior Member

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    Salute to our Scientists and hope for the citizens living in drought affected areas.
     
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  6. Mikesingh

    Mikesingh Senior Member Senior Member

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    The Chennai Water Desalination Ltd. (CWDL) with an installed capacity to produce 100 million liters of drinking water per day (MLD), is the largest such plant in India.
    Commercial operations began on 25 July 2010, and average production has been 90 MLD. With Chennai being a burgeoning metropolis with an unfulfilled requirement of nearly 400 MLD of water, this project is the first among a series of desalination plants being planned in the state to meet the deficit in supply.

    However, at > Rs 48.66 per kilolitre of water, it is pretty steep!
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2016
  7. Navnit Kundu

    Navnit Kundu Pika Hu Akbarrr!! Senior Member

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    That's okay because the social cost of not having this is even more steep. At least we have an option now, even though it is a costly one. Fights over water leads to mass exodus from rural areas to urban ones and scrambles the planning of other urban centers. It leads to slums, unhygienic conditions, crime and so on.
     
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  8. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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  9. garg_bharat

    garg_bharat Senior Member Senior Member

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    In Delhi, a 4000L tanker costs Rs 600 or Rs 150 per kilolitre of "unprocessed" water which is usually not fit for drinking.

    People pay a lot of money for water in large cities.

    There is no option but to build more desalination plants.
     
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  10. Mikesingh

    Mikesingh Senior Member Senior Member

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    Agreed! But we need to keep working on getting newer and cheaper conversion technologies so that we can build at least 20 desalination plants with a capacity of 100MLD per day in every state by the sea/ocean, 10 of which could be used for drip irrigation purposes.

    This way we can kill two birds with one stone - drinking water and irrigation especially in water deficient states which depend only on the rains.
     
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  11. Mikesingh

    Mikesingh Senior Member Senior Member

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  12. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    Curious to know,
    Meanwhile India (considering world average) would have lost 40% of current drinking water available by 2030(this technique could save us), China could have used it's all of water by then.
    Worse than our problem it will be surely.
    Anybody knows how they gonna tackle that problem?
    :confused1:
    Thanks. :namaste:
     
  13. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    This is for the backup of lost water reserves man. By 2030, world would have used 40% of water.
    There will be no advantage of linked empty rivers then. So, option left will be the purifying see water. Once, we start doing it at large scale, problem of water will be solved forever.
     
  14. piKacHHu

    piKacHHu Regular Member

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    Agreed! Desalination is nothing new which BARC has developed. It is originally meant for providing "Process Water" (i.e. DM water used for machinery which is "too" pure to be drinkable) to the nuclear power plants located near the sea coast using their rejected heat (in the form of steam). Without any surplus heat source, this process is simply not viable. RO is relatively more economical but question here is where is the "Water" to be purified.?
    Simple methods like rain water harvesting (making bunds and small reservoirs) and judicious use of ground water for agriculture can solve most of our problems.
     
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  15. garg_bharat

    garg_bharat Senior Member Senior Member

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    So at least some regions can get water by this. At least in TN, Maharashtra, Gujarat.

    + waste water needs to be recycled effectively.

    Several technologies together can solve the problem effectively.

    I believe global warming is the cause of uneven rains. So technology is necessary to solve this problem.
     
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  16. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    This is a great development 40 percent make be the near term goal but It could be lot higher in the future


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  17. rock127

    rock127 Maulana Rockullah Senior Member

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    But why would Politicians like to make use of such tech? Saline water is costly already but again how cost effective it would be for areas not near Sea?

    These Politicians are doing "Water Politics". :tsk:
     
  18. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    New Tech is always costlier.
    Slowly slowly, we'll get effective and cheaper methods with time. Why panic?
     
  19. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    How many rivers are are there in UAE at first? :rolleyes:
    India's river linking project is too risky for safety as well as environment geographically.
    Other thing, thus 1.3 billion nation has an area more than 3.28 millions square kilometres.
    Do you think it's a joke to connecting entire nation in a day. Even after having second largest road, and fourth largest rail network, it's not sufficient and we are still building.
    On topic:
    Indian River Linking project of connecting 37 is more harmful for environment and so risky because "river is not a pipe which we can control"
    So, kindly think over it:
    Others too have brain that they are converting saline water and delaying river projects. Using costly water is better than dying in floods.
    Hope you understand. Anyway, a nice thing,
    Centre plans 50,000 km of waterways nationwide

    I hope you understand.
    Think over this point now as well. River linking can create problems. Anyway, agrees on rest of your post. Recycling water is important at all.
     
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  20. piKacHHu

    piKacHHu Regular Member

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    Let me put my arguments it in a point wise fashion;
    1. Desalination is an energy intensive therefore a cost intensive process, as you have agreed. There are two major type of Desalination process viz. (a) Thermal Desalination, and (b) Membrane based Reverse Osmosis.
    Option (a) is more energy intensive than Option (b) due to higher requirement of energy. On the other hand, Option (b) has issues with membrane separation efficiency, i.e. a significant part of input water gets rejected in the process. Moreover, saline rich effluent disposal is an another issue which adds up to the cost of Desalination.
    2. Having said that, in Indian context, we are quite blessed with availability of fresh water if you consider so many perennial rivers flowing through northern and peninsular region (Even though per capita fresh water availability is low) . Adding to that, 3 months of south west monsoon during which our coastal western ghats get more than adequate rains that make these region water excess; at least we don't need to worry about their water requirements. For the parched regions like, Marathwada and Vidarbha, their problem could not be attributed to water scarcity or failure of monsoon alone. Unbridled or excessive usage of ground water for irrigation of sugar cane has imposed a huge strain on fresh water availability. In this case, setting up Desalination process in these regions is useless because there is no water source available to process at all ! Setting up dedicated Desalination plant for these regions in the coastal areas will impose transportation cost which will negate the feasibility of the project.
    3. Rajasthan which receives lowest rain throughout the year and cursed with no perennial river (except for Chambal) doesn't make any news for water crisis. The only reason why they don't face this issue is the efficient water management. Indeed, the report tells that there are many places in the Rajasthan where desalination technique is used. But that process (which is membrane based RO process) is applied only to those areas where the ground water is contaminated harmful elements like Arsenic, Mercury etc. We can learn many things from the micro-management of water employed (Like Drip irrigation, Sprinkler technique etc.) in Rajasthan.
    4. Chennai is one the examples which people use to tell in support of Desalination. Indeed, Chennai uses Desalination water at larger scale but here the hidden fact is that most of the desalinated water is supplied to the industries. The industries has to pay for extra cost incurred due to desalination of sea water which in turn free-up the fresh water being used by them earlier for the Public usage !
    Together with proper planning and effective rain water harvesting, which probably contribute more than Desalination has resolved much of the water woes in Chennai.
    5. As I demonstrated with my arguments ( I will post some sources/links regarding that later), There are many other options or rather low hanging fruits available like Rain water harvesting, River linkage at regional level, etc. that can help us to resolve water crisis before going towards Desalination as an option.
    NDTV is at fault by publishing such a shallow story without digging deeper into the problem!
     
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  21. Indx TechStyle

    Indx TechStyle Perfaarmance Naarmal Senior Member

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    I can understand your point very well man but even rivers won't gonna be sufficient. We need more.
    Plus linking rivers is dangerous.
    Government can easily connect entire nation but that can cause environmental problems and floods.
    Though government isn't prohibiting connecting rivers but they'll do it with more precision and care because slow project will better than linking rivers mindlessly and then, suffering from curse of floods.
    :rolleyes:
    For this technique, it's needed because world would have lost 40% of water by 2030. So, drawing sea water is best way. Yes, this method is costly but we found a costly solution at least that can save us from crisis.
    And FYI, this tech is brand new for India. As the time passes, we will discover cheaper ways as well.
    :)
     
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