Saudi Arabia Accuses Myanmar of 'Ethnic Cleansing' of Muslim Rohingya

Discussion in 'Subcontinent & Central Asia' started by rock127, Aug 8, 2012.

  1. rock127

    rock127 Maulana Rockullah Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2009
    Messages:
    8,938
    Likes Received:
    10,290
    Location:
    India
    Saudi Arabia Accuses Myanmar of 'Ethnic Cleansing' of Muslim Rohingya

    Saudi Arabia has accused Myanmar's authorities of ethnic cleansing the Muslim community - described by the UN as the most persecuted minority on earth.

    The Saudi cabinet, which is chaired by King Abdullah, has also condemned the "brutal attacks" made against members of the Islamic Rohingya community in the western state of Rakhine, and urged the international community "to take up its responsibilities by providing protection and quality of life to Muslims in Myanmar and preventing further loss of life."The international NGO Human Rights Watch (HRW) alleges that Myanmar's security forces have killed and raped scores of Muslims during the ongoing sectarian conflict in Rakhine, between members of the Arakan Buddhist sect and the Islamic Rohingya community.

    The conflict began in June 2011, when 10 Muslims were lynched by a crowd of angry Buddhists. According to one estimate, 80 people have been killed and more than 100,000 displaced during the conflict - however HRW believes this figure is "grossly underestimated".

    Although there is no official state religion in Myanmar, the majority of the population are Buddhist. The Rohingya have never been given Myanmese citizenship, and are seen as illegal immigrants by the country's government - President Thein Sein has said that the best way to end violence against the Rohingya would be to send them to another country.

    However neighbouring Bangladesh has provided little encouragement to Muslims seeking sanctuary across the border, and has even ordered three international charities to desist from providing aid to Rohingya refugees.

    In addition to the Saudi cabinet, the head of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) has decried the ongoing violence in Myanmar.
    Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu "expressed disappointment over the failure of the international community to take action to stop the massacres, violations, oppression and ethnic cleansing perpetrated by the government of Myanmar against the Rohingya Muslims."
     
    HEILTAMIL likes this.
  2.  
  3. blank_quest

    blank_quest Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2012
    Messages:
    2,128
    Likes Received:
    927
    are they fu-king brethren of rohingyas!.. uptill now they not even would have heard wtf is rohingya before the incident! Thekedaar of Islam.. what have they done after 9/11 to pacify the western worlds fear of stupid Islam-phobia
     
  4. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,274
    Likes Received:
    11,283
    Location:
    BANGalore
  5. blank_quest

    blank_quest Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2012
    Messages:
    2,128
    Likes Received:
    927
    Oil suckers money mongers !
     
  6. rock127

    rock127 Maulana Rockullah Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2009
    Messages:
    8,938
    Likes Received:
    10,290
    Location:
    India
    Pakistan the true Thekedar of Islam should open it's land for Rohingyas and give them citizenship as well.
     
  7. Never in a 100 years they will . . . . Filthy hypocrites

    Or perhaps if they agree to eternal slavery and do no demand citizenship or rights
     
  8. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    Messages:
    31,650
    Likes Received:
    17,146
    Location:
    EST, USA
    Saudi Arabia accusing others of ill-treating minorities?

    What a scream!

    :rotflmao:
     
  9. rock127

    rock127 Maulana Rockullah Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2009
    Messages:
    8,938
    Likes Received:
    10,290
    Location:
    India
    Rohingyas should not live in the lands of Kafirs... they should go back to their homeland and demand citizenship by Saudis.
     
  10. HEILTAMIL

    HEILTAMIL Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2013
    Messages:
    238
    Likes Received:
    57
    Location:
    UNION OF INDIA
    Re: Saudi Arabia Accuses Myanmar of 'Ethnic Cleansing' of Muslim Rohin

    atleast one country in the world seems to have balls to raise voice over Ethnic Cleansing in the international community
     
    gotti likes this.
  11. JBH22

    JBH22 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2010
    Messages:
    3,620
    Likes Received:
    2,390
    Re: Saudi Arabia Accuses Myanmar of 'Ethnic Cleansing' of Muslim Rohin

    Quoted for truth. Anyways Saudis should set the example only trouble is that Rohingyas are coming to India :)
     
    Sameet Pattnaik likes this.
  12. dhananjay1

    dhananjay1 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    Messages:
    972
    Likes Received:
    912
    Location:
    india
    Re: Saudi Arabia Accuses Myanmar of 'Ethnic Cleansing' of Muslim Rohin

    Wahhabi thugs have no right to utter a single word against Myanmar. If they are so grieved they should invite all Rohingyas to live in Saudi Arabia. The same goes for all the western countries who whine about human rights.
     
  13. gotti

    gotti Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2013
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Pakistan
    Re: Saudi Arabia Accuses Myanmar of 'Ethnic Cleansing' of Muslim Rohin

    Although, Pakistan has been open to accept immigrants from India, Bangladesh, Nepal, China, Central Asia, Afghanistan and the Baluch from Iran, it can only do so much to accept the Rohingya.

    There are Rohingya communities based in Karachi but what we need to look at is the problem that the Rakhine state is truly drowned in.

    Post-independence, the Rohingya were seen to be separatists because of their idea to have their own state like Pakistan.

    Furthermore, the father of Aung San Suu Kyi, Aung San, also saw these people as separatists. This xenophobic sentiment within the Burmese populace is shameful and even more so, when you notice that the democratic forces of the country headed by Aung San Suu Kyi, find it to be the death of their political credibility if they are to speak in favor of these oppressed people.

    With an India-friendly government in Bangladesh, as well as their need for gas from Burma, noticing India stay mum on the issue like on the Tamil issue in Sri Lanka is depressing.

    Even a comment on the issue in Sri Lanka would have sufficed but India chose to stay mum despite suffering unrest in Tamil Nadu (where the issue is not a Karunanidhi or ADMK issue but that of the Dravidian Tamil people).

    Despite having reservations about Arab and Iranian influence in my nation, I will commend Saudis for doing this and request the Indians to do the same for the Sri Lankan Tamils, that they have abandoned, unashamedly.

    Pakistan only makes comments along with the Saudis and OIC for the condolence and moral support of the oppressed communities so as to not make them feel unwanted or uncared for.

    If you heard a story of murder anywhere in the world, of a Hindu, lets say, in Pakistan, wouldn't you feel sorrow?

    How about when they converted?

    Even if they were to come on television and say publicly, that they did it out of their will, wouldn't you still feel close to them because being a devout Hindu (Vaishnavism), you couldn't possibly imagine someone leave what you find to be true and dear to your heart?

    Then, why dismiss the Tamil issue by saying it was "the church"? Why shove it under the rug in this way?

    Despite their countless flaws and weaknesses, Saudis and Pakistanis were on the moral high ground when they condemned an atrocity. Where does India stand in this regard?

    Didn't India step into Bangladesh to prevent a "genocide"? Or, was it another futile, geopolitical exercise?

    These are important questions Indians need to ask themselves and reflect on them.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2013
  14. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2014
    Messages:
    4,726
    Likes Received:
    3,165
    Location:
    Mumbai
    http://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asiapacific/change-ruling-class/2229286.html

    Change ruling class, prevent Muslim 'occupation', says hardline Myanmar monk lobby

    SITTWE, Myanmar: The leader of an influential and controversial Buddhist lobby group in divided Rakhine in north-west Myanmar has called for the people of the state to govern themselves in order to prevent a Muslim "occupation".

    Mr Nan Da Ba Tha, the state chairman of Ma Ba Tha - or Patriotic Association of Myanmar - said the elections on Nov 8 will be critical in ensuring Rakhine preserves its proper Buddhist faith and enforces the laws of the land, something he believed the central Government had failed to do.

    "The people of Rakhine need to manage our own state, not the central Government," he said. "The daily lives of the Rakhine people are filled with poverty and low standards.

    "The country has already changed but most people don't see any of that change. We have transitioned from a military dictatorship to a democratic country but the ruling class is still the same. Our country needs to change this class."

    [​IMG]

    Buddhism is the dominant religion in Myanmar, but in Rakhine there remains tense religious divide with the Muslim community. (Photo: Jack Board)

    He also blamed long-running divisions in the region on "propaganda-spreading Bengalis" and said the spread of Islam in the region was a trend that needed to be stopped. "The Bengalis want to take this land on a permanent basis for generations to come," he said.

    Ma Ba Tha is a hardline nationalist movement whose best known member is Mr Ashin Wirathu, a Mandalay-based monk who has been labelled the "Burmese Bin Laden" and the "face of Buddhist terror" by international media.

    Mr Ashin Wirathu has previously been accused of inciting violence against Muslim populations and using hate speech that has contributed to nationwide divisions between communities - claims he has denied. Ma Ba Tha is not part of the Buddhist Sangha, the monastic order, but is said to boast many members who are.

    'FOLLOW THE RULES'

    Rakhine was rocked by sectarian violence in 2012, resulting in Government-enforced segregation, which is still in place in Sittwe. Rohingya Muslims, which the Government identifies as Bengalis, live in security-fenced villages and internally-displaced persons camps on the fringes of the city.

    "The violence in 2012 was a strategic plan by the Bengalis, they want to occupy Rakhine state and they committed crimes and rape," Mr Nan Da Ba Tha said.

    Although there are believed to be new arrivals from across the fluid Bangladesh border, many Muslims in the region say they have ancestry dating back hundreds of years.

    Still, Rohingyas and other Muslim groups are not entitled to vote in the elections - a Government decree based on intensified scrutiny of individuals' citizenship statuses.

    Unlike some of his more hardline contemporaries, Mr Nan Da Ba Tha accepted that reconciliation would be possible in Rakhine and that people of different faiths could live together, on the condition that Muslims followed the laws of the country.

    "It all depends on them, because they have to follow the rules of the country," he said. "They must stop telling lies to the world that they are 'Rohingya'. If they obey then they can apply for citizenship," he said before pointing to a world map depicting the world and its religions, notably with the Islamic nations of the Middle East greatly inflated in size, in order to enhance his message about the risks of a Muslim takeover.

    [​IMG]

    Mr Nan Da Ba Tha explains his theory on the spread of Islam, using a world map that has the size of Islamic nations in the Middle East inflated. (Photo: Jack Board)

    'NOT BASED ON RELIGION'

    Mr Zaw Tun, the director of Wan Lark, a non-government organisation focused on community development and an election monitor, believes that healing divisions and improving the livelihoods or both Buddhists and Muslims will be a major responsibility and challenge for a future government, regardless of who wins the vote.

    "This is not based on religion," he said. "So many different religious groups lived together here for a long time in Rakhine and never fought like this before. Economically, every community has a lot of difficulties."

    "Indeed, this is abusive to use the excuse of religious differences. We analyse it as only a border issue and the Government is the only one who can solve it," he added.

    Mr Nan Da Ba Tha agreed: "People around the world think it's a conflict between two religions, Islam and Buddhism, but it's not."

    He blamed Bangladesh and its swelling population for a border overflow and reinforced a message about maintaining the integrity of Myanmar's borders and its dominant religion. About 80 per cent of the country identifies as Buddhist, while around 4 per cent are Muslim.

    [​IMG]

    A woman praying at Lawka Nanda, a modern and popular Buddhist temple in central Sittwe. (Photo: Jack Board)

    Throughout Sittwe, the status of Buddhism is far more visible and entrenched, with large golden pagodas, old and new. In contrast, local Muslims said about 35 mosques in the city are now destroyed or abandoned, either burned during the 2012 violence or converted into headquarters for military troops or police.

    Anti-Islam sentiment is commonplace in Rakhine, with many locals saying they agree with the Government's decision to segregate the two communities. The city has now been peaceful as a result, and Ms Saw Mra Raza Linn, the chairperson of Rakhaing Women's Union and key negotiator in Myanmar's peace process believes both groups want to keep it that way.

    "The Rakhine are almost all Buddhists and killing is not in our nature," she said. "They want to live peacefully. So to maintain this kind of peaceful situation, both communities need to be responsible and the government also."
     

Share This Page