Satellite for armed forces to be ready in a month

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by rahulrds1, Jun 4, 2012.

  1. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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    The armed forces are finally set to get their first-ever dedicated military satellite, a naval surveillance and communications one, as part of their long-standing quest to effectively harness the final frontier of space.

    The geo-stationary naval satellite has "already been shipped out'' for its launch that will take place "within a month or so", government sources said.

    A not-too-subtle indicator of the space event in the offing was also the creation of a new post of assistant chief of naval staff (communications, space and network-centric operations) at the Navy head-quarters over the weekend.

    Though tight-lipped about the "over-the-sea" satellite's launch, the Navy on Sunday said Rear Admiral Kishan K Pandey, a communications and electronic warfare specialist, had taken over as the new ACNS (CSNCO) in keeping with its endeavour to transform from a "platform-centric Navy'' to a "network-enabled Navy''.

    The satellite, with an over 1,000 nautical mile footprint over the Indian Ocean Region (IOR) stretching from Africa's east coast right till Malacca Strait, will enable the Navy to network all its warships, submarines and aircraft with operational centres ashore through high-speed data-links.

    There is an urgent need to keep real-time tabs over the rapidly-militarizing IOR, where China is increasingly expanding its strategic footprint, as well as on troop movements, missile silos, military installations and airbases across land borders.

    The long-delayed naval satellite is to be followed by ones for the Army and IAF for "over-the-land use''. In absence of dedicated satellites, the armed forces have so far depended on "dual-use'' Indian satellites as well as lease of transponders on foreign ones for their navigation, communication, surveillance and reconnaissance purposes.

    There are around 300 dedicated or dual-use military satellites orbiting around the earth at present, with the US operating over 50% of them, followed by Russia and China.

    China, in particular, is pursuing an extensive military-space programme that even extends to advanced ASAT (anti-satellite) capabilities with "direct-ascent" missiles, hit-to-kill "kinetic" and directed-energy laser weapons.

    DRDO, on its part, contends it can quickly fashion ASAT weapons, if required, by marrying the propulsion system of the over 5,000-km Agni-V missile tested recently with the "kill vehicle" of the almost-ready two-tier BMD ( ballistic missile system) system it has developed.

    But India is still some distance away from effective ASAT capabilities. The government is also not yet willing to establish a tri-Service Aerospace Command on the lines of the Strategic Forces Command which handles nuclear weapons.

    The naval satellite is a step in the right direction. The Navy has already tested the "ship-end'' of the new space era dawning through the massive Tropex (theatre-level readiness and operational exercise) held in January-February. The network-centric operations were tried with both the Eastern and Western Fleets, backed by fighters, spy drones and helicopters, out at sea.

    source : First satellite for armed forces to be ready in a month - The Times of India
     
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  3. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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    "tri-Service Aerospace Command" on the lines of the Strategic Forces Command which handles nuclear weapons.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2012
  4. sukhish

    sukhish Senior Member Senior Member

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    will it be launched in PSLV or on GSLV, since it is a Geo synchronous orbit satalliete.
     
  5. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    Good development lets wait and see which vehicle launch this satellite. Navy will be fully network centric now.
     
  6. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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    Need for tri-service aerospace command: IAF
    PTI | 09:10 PM,Oct 03,2011

    New Delhi, Oct 3 (PTI) The Indian Air Force (IAF) today said there was a need for having a tri-service aerospace command to look after the military issues related to space. "Time has come that we look into the realm of an aerospace command. It would be a joint command where all the three services have to put their hands together," IAF chief Air Chief Marshal N A K Browne said here. He was addressing the annual Air Force Day press conference here. All the three services have been talking about creating a joint command for management and creation of a space command to tackle military threats and utilising space-based capabilities.

    more links:
    India's Aerospace Command by Ashok Sharma
    Integrated Space Cell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    domain-b.com : Indian Army seeks establishment of tri-services aerospace command
     
  7. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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    Satellite for Navy will be launched by Ariane-5

    The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has built a dedicated satellite for the Navy which will be launched in a few months by an Ariane-5 rocket from the Kourou island in French Guiana.

    The communication satellite that weighs 2.5 tonnes is currently undergoing thermo-vacuum tests at the ISRO Satellite Centre in Bangalore. But the space organisation has not so far officially acknowledged that the satellite is meant for the Navy and has given it an innocuous name, GSAT-7.

    It will be one of the several satellites to be launched by Ariane-5.

    “This is the first time that the ISRO is building a dedicated satellite for the Navy. It is meant for defence requirements. The Navy and other agencies [the Army and the Indian Air Force] will use it for their communication,” ISRO sources said.

    The GSAT series, built by the ISRO, are communication satellites which cannot be used for surveillance.

    The Navy will use GSAT-7 to communicate with its submarines, frigates, destroyers and aircraft from its centres on the shore.

    The ISRO's annual report for 2011-12 has sparse information on GSAT-7. It merely says, “GSAT-7, a multi-band satellite, is planned to be launched on board a procured launcher during 2012.” The report, in another place, adds, “The satellite employs the standard 2.5 tonne bus platform with the power handling capability of around 2,600 W and a lift-off mass of 2,550 kg. All the mainframe and the payload elements have been delivered. The satellite will be ready for shipment for launch during 2012.”

    Communication satellite

    The ISRO's 2010-2011 report is a little more liberal with information. It says, “GSAT-7 is a multi-band satellite carrying payloads in UHF [ultra-high frequency], S-band, C-band and Ku-band…The configuration of the satellite has been finalised and the design of the new payload elements is completed. The platform systems are under fabrication and payload sub-system realisation is on-going.”

    Although the ISRO planned to launch GSAT-7 in 2011 onboard an indigenous Geo-Synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) from Sriharikota, it has been forced to go abroad because of its failures with its GSLV in April 2010 and December 2010. The GSLV could not put GSAT-4 into orbit in April 2010 after its indigenous cryogenic engine failed to ignite. The next GSLV flight in December 2010, with a Russian cryogenic engine, failed too. It was to have hoisted into orbit GSAT-5P.

    These failures and the long time that is being taken to build the GSLV-Mark III rocket with an indigenous cryogenic engine have delayed the launch of Chandrayan-II and the ISRO's efforts to send an Indian astronaut into space.

    With the GSLV with an indigenous cryogenic engine yet to prove its mettle and its performance with a Russian cryogenic engine below par, the ISRO does not want to take chances with GSAT-7.

    “GSAT-7 is an operational satellite meant for the Navy. It has multi-frequencies. So we do not want to take chances,” explained the ISRO sources.

    The Hindu : News / National : ISRO plans to launch satellite for Navy in a few months
     

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