São Paulo City's 460 years Birthday.

Discussion in 'General Multimedia' started by IBSA, Jan 26, 2014.

  1. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    25, January is the municipal holiday of São Paulo City's Birthday, the biggest Brazilian and South American city. The city make 460 years old, since it was established in January, 25 of 1554.

    Some pics of the most famous points of the city.


    Paulista Avenue, our of '5th Avenue'. 'Paulista' is the gentilic of who born in São Paulo State. Avenues in this area have the names of important São Paulo State's cities. Who born in São Paulo City is 'Paulistano'. India's Consulate, and that of some other countries, is in this avenue. Paulista Avenue has the most expensive square meter of the city.

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  3. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    What a beautiful city! More photos please.
     
  4. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Municipal Theater. Opened in 1911 with a eclectic architecture, a common style in Europe that time. In front of it is the Ramos de Azevedo Square

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  5. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Chá Viaduct. Chá means 'tea' (cay), because in the region there were tea plantations in older times. In the right side is the Ramos de Azevedo Square, and in the upper right corner is the Shopping Light. In the past that building was the HQ of british Light Company, which supplied the public lightning of the city.

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  6. Eastman

    Eastman Regular Member

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    Bye Bye DFI
    São Paulo looks better then any of Indian city, beautiful, no rickshaw or cycle wallah no embarrassing paan shops very clean :truestory::truestory:
     
  7. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Correios Square. Correios means mail company, for in the past this building was the Mail Office HQ. Today it become a cultural center.

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  8. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Santa Ifigênia Viaduct. Opened in 1913, it was fully made in Belgium.

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  9. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Anhangabau Valley. Anhangabau means 'river of bad spirits', because the natives believed in that area bad spirits lived. There was a river here, but today it was channeled and is underground.

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  10. PredictablyMalicious

    PredictablyMalicious Punjabi Senior Member

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    Gostei muito das fotos ! Postar fotos das gatas do SP?
     
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  11. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Banespa Tower. Banespa is the Bank of State of São Paulo. Opened in 1947, its architecture was inspired in that of the Empire State Building. With 162 meters, he become the tallest building of the city until 1960, and the tallest concrete structure in the world until 1962.This tower is the HQ of Banespa Bank, which has been purchased by spanish Santander Bank.

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  12. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Martinelli Building. It was the first skyscraper of São Paulo City, and of Brazil also, with 105 meters high. Surpassed by Banespa Tower. It was builded by the italian naval engineer Commendator Giuseppe Martinelli in 1929. Many people said in that time the building would fall, and in order to proof the contrary Martinelli ordered to build his mansion house at the top of building. There is a legend of a blond ghost living inside building.

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  13. PredictablyMalicious

    PredictablyMalicious Punjabi Senior Member

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    @IBSA : My friend went to UFMG. Is it a good university?
     
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  14. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    UFMG is the federal university of Minas Gerais State. A bad varsity it don't it, but there are others better than it.
     
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  15. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Liberdade ("Liberty) is the Eastern neighbourhood of São Paulo. It was inhabited mainly by japanese immigrants, which arrived in Brazil from 1910 and so on. Along the time japanese were enriching and moved to other parts of city. Today the chinis, a very recent immigration group, are taking control of this area and becoming Liberdade in a Chinatown.

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  16. PredictablyMalicious

    PredictablyMalicious Punjabi Senior Member

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    Brazil should kick out Chinis before they begin to outnumber the locals. These people refuse to assimilate and segregate themselves from locals in every country they immigrate to. Hence, you see so many China towns all over the world. They are also incredibly racist to dark skinned people - this is something you want to avoid at all costs in such a diverse country as Brazil.
     
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  17. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    India also has its little corner in São Paulo City. It is the India Cultural Center of the India General Consulate. It was opened in January, 25 of 2011, so it is very new, and is 3 years old.

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    A Little India in the heart of Sao Paulo

    Alameda Sarutaia is a quiet street in the leafy neighbourhood of Jardims, just off Avenida Paulista, the main avenue that runs through the centre of this megalopolis. Here, tall buildings rise from the corners of streets and old villas sit amid Italian cafes and restaurants offering traditional Brazilian food. There is a whiff of coffee in the air, mixing with the smell of ethanol fumes being emitted by cars zipping towards the avenue. Just as you turn into Alameda Sarutaia and cross a couple of buildings with terrace gardens, you come across an old, beautiful villa with red walls and green gate. It's not just the sheer beauty of the house that makes you stop in front of it. The sounds coming from inside -- tabla beats mixing with the strains of sitar and an Indian voice singing an old song devoted to a god -- make you stop. A step closer to the gate and you smell incense.

    This is the Indian Cultural Centre (ICC) of Sao Paulo. A few days ago as we went there to attend an event, it was amazing to see so many Brazilians present there. The ICC has a decent auditorium, but it was overflowing, with people sitting on the floor, on the steps or standing just standing outside the hall. When you see such a large number of Brazilians at an Indian cultural event, it's impossible not to ask what attracts them to Indian dance and music and culture. The two countries have been so far -- geographically as well as culturally -- from each other that there hasn't been much cultural exchange between the two countries.

    But at least here is Sao Paulo, the scenario has changed in the past couple of years. With the opening of the centre less than two years ago, the ICC has become Little India, where anyone interested in any aspect of Indian culture hacan drop by and get immersed in Indian dance, music, spiritual traditions or in the impressive collection of books in the library.

    But if the centre has become a thriving hub of Indian culture in such a short span, it's because of hard work and dedication of some people -- Indians and Brazilians. And some of them showed their dedication to their work that evening.

    The first one to perform on stage was Iara Ananda, who teaches Bharata Natyam at the centre. She is a young Brazilian dancer who is equally at home in classical traditions as well as in Bollywood dancing. Extremely talented, Iara is at the centre every Thursday, sitting on the floor with a stick in her hand which she beats on a little drum as a group of Brazilian girls swirl on their feet and move together in a rhythm. This evening she performed an ode to Shiva (the day being Mahashivratri). The dance was so captivating and Iara's movements and expressions so natural, it's almost impossible to think that she is not Indian by birth, born in a family of classical dancers. But she is a Brazilian who has spent some time in India.

    The next person on stage was Gyaneshree Karahe, the Kathak instructor at the centre. A disciple of Kathak legend Birju Maharaj, Gyaneshree too performed a dance about Shiva. During the time she was on stage, dancing with a smile on her face, the audience just couldn't take their eyes off her. The Brazilians know a few things about drums, beats and dancing. They are a musical people. Even they talk in a sing-song way. For such people to be awestruck by an Indian dance, Gyaneshree must be an excellent dancer, which she is. Certainly, she got many new students that evening for her classes at the centre.

    Silvana Duarte was up next. An elegant lady with very polished manners, she is the Odissi teacher at the centre. Silvana, a disciple of Odissi legend Kelucharan Mahapatra, too dedicated her dance to Shiva. Yet again, not a missed step and not a wrong expression. As Silvana moved on the stage in her elegant steps, I noticed a few young Brazilian girls sitting near the stage. Their mouth were wide open and eyes shining. Probably, they hadn't seen such a beautiful blend of colours, music and dance ever before. Imagine, this lady travelled to India several times to learn Odissi from the doyen of this form of dancing.

    A few months ago, Sonia Galvao, who too learnt Odissi from the great Kelucharan Mahapatra, gave a performance at the ICC. Dedicating her dances to her guru, Sonia was on stage for more than an hour in the ICC auditorium packed to its capacity. There were just a few Indians in the crowd. Sonia Galvao's dance was so impressive that one may think that she is born and brought up in Bhuvaneshwar. She is a very much a Brazilian from Sao Paulo and she has spent a lot of money and time in travelling to India and learn this dance from the biggest Odissi guru. Even before the cultural centre opened here, Sonia had been performing in the city and across Brazil, promoting Odissi and Indian culture on her own.

    The evening ended with food -- a mixture of Indian Brazilian cuisine -- brought by many of a few hundred people who had gathered at the centre for the event. The programme was held under the umbrella of Brazil India Club, a brainchild and initiative of Indian consul-general, G V Srinivas, and the ICC director, Kamaljit Singh. In a short span, the club has become a platform for Indians and Brazilians to meet and share food and their experiences at the centre.

    The centre is always buzzing with activity. Walk through its three floors and you see Brazilians learning Indian dances, music, Hindi and yoga. And it's all free. As one Brazilian said, "In a city where the only thing free is air, it's unbelievable that you can learn so much without paying anything." But it's not free courses that has made the centre so popular. The director of the centre, Kamaljit Singh, brings amazing energy to the place. He organises events, invites people, addresses the gatherings, moves chairs and even makes coffee for his guests, all this with a smile on his face. It's his tireless work that has made the centre a Little India in the heart of Sao Paulo.
    Next Wednesday, the centre celebrates Holi. The India lovers in this city are eagerly waiting for the colourful event.

    A Little India in the heart of Sao Paulo by Main Street : Shobhan Saxena's blog-The Times Of India
     
  18. PredictablyMalicious

    PredictablyMalicious Punjabi Senior Member

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    @IBSA: Last year, the Hume Society's 41st annual conference was held in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Hopefully this happens, I would be able to attend. Hume was btw a very famous British philosopher.
     
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  19. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    This will be difficult. China is the main Brazil's economical partner surpassing USA participation in our commercial balance. So, Brazilian government will not want make troubles with China. Even more, chinis in their shops sells cheap electronical paraphernalia goods 'made in china' smuggled via Paraguay, and this type of commerce make sucess between our poor people. São Paulo City, as well as Brazil, have a huge informal economy, a thing that chinis understand how it works. Chinese mob already have presence among chini community here.
     
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  20. PredictablyMalicious

    PredictablyMalicious Punjabi Senior Member

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    Fortunately Brazil is a monolingual country and so they are forced to assimilate at least linguistically. The ones who won't make the effort will end up leaving eventually. Also, the Brazilian women are very open to inerracial relationships and so we can expect to see the chini gene being diluted over time.
     
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  21. IBSA

    IBSA Regular Member

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    Of course, we have a very strong interbreeding custom. I had have a colleage that was born from a marriage between a japanese and a chini, something hard to happen since both people hates each other.

    But here in Brazil all is possible to happen!

    Someday I will know someone born from a marriage between an indian and a chini. :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2014

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