Russian Ballistic Missiles - News and Updates.

Discussion in 'Europe and Russia' started by Singh, Jun 20, 2009.

  1. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,267
    Location:
    011
    Russia's Bulava missile 'will fly' - Navy chief


    MOSCOW, June 19 (RIA Novosti) - Russia will carry out the next test of a Bulava sea-launched ballistic missile in late July, and will conduct a total of four or five launches this year, the Navy commander said on Friday.

    "The next launch is planned for the second half of July, and a total of four or five launches are planned in 2009," Adm. Vladimir Vysotsky said.

    Despite five failures in 10 trials, the last unsuccessful trial being in December 2008, Russia's Defense Ministry is planning to complete Bulava tests and put the ICBM into service by the end of 2009.

    "It will fly, it will definitely fly," Vysotsky told reporters.

    The Russian military says the Bulava, along with Topol-M ballistic missiles, will become the backbone of Russia's nuclear triad.

    The triad comprises land-based ballistic missile systems, nuclear-propelled submarines armed with sea-launched ballistic missiles, and strategic bombers carrying nuclear bombs and nuclear-capable cruise missiles.

    The Bulava-M (SS-NX-30) ICBM carries up to 10 nuclear warheads and has a range of 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles). The three-stage ballistic missile is designed for deployment on Borey-class Project 955 nuclear-powered submarines.

    Currently, six types of silo-based and road-mobile ICBMs, including the heavy Voyevoda (SS-18 Satan), capable of carrying 10 warheads, and the Topol-M (Stalin), are in operational service with the Strategic Missile Forces.

    The SMF reportedly has a total of 538 ICBMs, including 306 SS-25 Topol (Sickle) missiles and 56 SS-27 Topol-M missiles.

    Russia's Bulava missile 'will fly' - Navy chief | Top Russian news and analysis online | 'RIA Novosti' newswire
     
  2.  
  3. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,267
    Location:
    011
    Topol-M, Bulava missiles to be core of Russian nuclear triad

    BALABANOVO (Russia), June 10 (RIA Novosti) - Topol-M and Bulava ballistic missiles will constitute the backbone of Russia's nuclear triad, a senior defense ministry official said on Wednesday.

    Russia's nuclear triad comprises land-based ballistic missile systems, nuclear-powered submarines equipped with sea-based ballistic missiles, and strategic bombers carrying nuclear bombs and nuclear-capable cruise missiles.

    "Topol-M and Bulava ballistic missile systems will be the core of the Russian nuclear triad," said Maj. Gen. Alexander Shevchenko, in charge of Armed Forces' armaments maintenance and support.

    At present, six types of silo-based and mobile ICBM system of the fourth and the fifth generation, including the heavy Voyevoda (SS-18 Satan), capable of carrying 10 warheads, and the Topol-M (Stalin) systems, are on combat duty with the Strategic Missile Forces.

    According to open sources, the total arsenal of Russia's SMF comprises 538 ICBMs, including 306 SS-25 Topol (Sickle) missiles and 56 SS-27 Topol-M missiles.

    In line with a new military doctrine, Russia will completely modernize the naval component of its nuclear triad by 2016.

    Fourth-generation Borey-class nuclear-powered submarines armed with Bulava ballistic missiles will form the core of Russia's fleet of modern strategic submarines.

    Shevchenko said the Russian Navy would commission two Borey-class nuclear submarines, Yury Dolgoruky and Alexander Nevsky, in the near future.

    Each submarine is capable of carrying up to 16 Bulava-M ballistic missiles.

    Russia will also modernize and expand its fleet of strategic bombers and create a national air-and-space defense network.

    According to various sources, the Russian Air Force currently deploys 141 Tu-22M3 Backfire bombers, 40 Tu-95MS Bear bombers, and 14 Tu-160 Blackjack planes.

    Russia plans to build at least one new Tu-160 bomber every one or two years to increase the number of available aircraft to 30.

    Deputy Prime Minister Sergei Ivanov said in February that Russia would continue developing and modernizing its nuclear triad despite the current global economic crisis.

    Topol-M, Bulava missiles to be core of Russian nuclear triad | Top Russian news and analysis online | 'RIA Novosti' newswire
     
  4. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,267
    Location:
    011
    Russia to conduct five tests of Bulava missile in 2009
    MOSCOW, April 28 (RIA Novosti) - The Russian Navy will conduct at least five test launches of the new Bulava sea-based ballistic missile in 2009, the deputy defense minister for procurement said on Thursday.

    Despite five failures in 10 trials, Russia's Defense Ministry is planning to complete a series Bulava tests and put the ICBM into service by the end of 2009.

    "Considering that we must ensure reliable performance characteristics of the [Bulava] missile, we have decided to raise the number of additional test launches to five, if everything goes well," Vladimir Popovkin said.

    Popovkin, who is visiting the Russian exposition at the IDEF-2009 arms show in Turkey, said that a faulty detail caused a test launch failure in December last year, and that the on-board systems would undergo additional ground testing in June-July prior to the next test launch.

    Vice Admiral Oleg Burtsev, deputy chief of the Navy General Staff, said in March that the Navy planned three Bulava test launches from the Dmitry Donskoi submarine this year. "If the tests are successful, they will continue on board the new Yury Dolgoruky nuclear-powered submarine," he said.

    The Bulava-M (SS-NX-30) ICBM carries up to 10 nuclear warheads and has a range of 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles). The three-stage ballistic missile is designed for deployment on Borey class Project 955 nuclear-powered submarines.

    Meanwhile, sea trials of Yury Dolgoruky, Russia's first Borey class strategic nuclear submarine, are due to start in the summer, when navigation begins in the White Sea.

    Two other Borey class nuclear submarines - the Alexander Nevsky and the Vladimir Monomakh - are currently under construction at the Sevmash shipyard, and are expected to be completed in 2009 and 2011. Russia is planning to build a total of eight submarines of this class by 2015.

    Russia to conduct five tests of Bulava missile in 2009 | Top Russian news and analysis online | 'RIA Novosti' newswire
     
  5. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,267
    Location:
    011
    Russia to put into service Bulava ballistic missiles in 2009


    MOSCOW, March 5 (RIA Novosti) - Russia's Defense Ministry is planning to complete tests and put into service sea-based Bulava intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBM) in 2009, a deputy defense minister said on Thursday.

    The Bulava (SS-NX-30) ICBM carries up to 10 nuclear warheads and has a range of 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles). It is designed for deployment on Borey-class Project 955 nuclear-powered submarines.

    "We are planning to complete the firing tests and put the Bulava missile system on combat duty aboard the Yury Dolgoruky submarine this year," Gen. Vladimir Popovkin said.

    The latest unsuccessful submerged test launch on December 23 from the Dmitry Donskoi strategic nuclear-powered submarine in the White Sea, off Russia's northwest coast, was Bulava's fifth failure in ten trials.

    However, the Russian military said that production flaws could be to blame for the unsuccessful test launches and insisted that the tests would continue until the missile was ready for production.

    Popovkin said the number of Bulava tests in 2009 could exceed five, and the first test would be conducted not earlier than in June.

    Meanwhile, sea trials of Yury Dolgoruky, Russia's first Borey-class strategic nuclear submarine are due to start in the spring when navigation begins in the White Sea.

    The submarine was built at the Sevmash plant in northern Russia and was taken out of dry dock in April 2007.

    The vessel is 170 meters (580 feet) long, has a hull diameter of 13 meters (42 feet), a crew of 107, including 55 officers, a maximum depth of 450 meters (about 1,500 feet) and a submerged speed of about 29 knots. It can carry up to 16 ballistic missiles and torpedoes.

    Two other Borey-class nuclear submarines, the Alexander Nevsky and the Vladimir Monomakh, are currently under construction at the Sevmash shipyard and are expected to be completed in 2009 and 2011. Russia is planning to build a total of eight submarines of this class by 2015.

    Popovkin said a quarter of funds from Russia's state defense orders would be allocated in 2009 to support the strategic nuclear forces, including their naval component.

    Russia's state defense orders for 2009 are worth about 1 trillion rubles ($28 billion), with money allocated to the Defense Ministry, as well as to more than 10 other ministries and agencies.

    Russia to put into service Bulava ballistic missiles in 2009 | Top Russian news and analysis online | 'RIA Novosti' newswire
     
  6. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,267
    Location:
    011
    U.S. not linked to failed Bulava launches - Russian minister

    MOSCOW, May 6 (RIA Novosti) - The United States had nothing to do with a number of unsuccessful launches of Russia's new Bulava sea-based ballistic missile, the Russian defense minister said in an interview with a respected daily.

    Some Russian media earlier reported that the U.S. had employed its latest electromagnetic weapons from bases in Alaska, northern Europe and Greenland to disrupt Bulava missile tests.

    "The Americans have nothing to do with it," Anatoly Serdyukov told Rossiiskaya Gazeta, adding that testing a missile for combat duty is a long and complicated process. "We didn't avoid failures and errors with all the other missiles that also underwent significant testing," he said.

    Despite five failures in 10 trials, the last unsuccessful trial being in December 2008, Russia's Defense Ministry is planning to complete a series of Bulava tests and put the ICBM into service by the end of 2009.

    The Bulava-M (SS-NX-30) ICBM carries up to 10 nuclear warheads and has a range of 8,000 kilometers (5,000 miles). The three-stage ballistic missile is designed for deployment on Borey class Project 955 nuclear-powered submarines.

    Meanwhile, the Yury Dolgoruky, Russia's first Borey class strategic nuclear submarine, is due to start sea trials in the summer in the White Sea.

    Two other Borey class nuclear submarines - the Alexander Nevsky and the Vladimir Monomakh - are currently under construction at the Sevmash shipyard, and are expected to be completed in 2009 and 2011. Russia is planning to build a total of eight submarines of this class by 2015.

    U.S. not linked to failed Bulava launches - Russian minister | Top Russian news and analysis online | 'RIA Novosti' newswire
     
  7. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
  8. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,267
    Location:
    011
    Russian missile commander opposes conventional warheads on ICBMs

    BALABANOVO (Moscow Region), June 10 (RIA Novosti) - Arming intercontinental ballistics missiles with conventional warheads would undermine global security, the commander of the Russian Strategic Missile Forces said on Wednesday.

    U.S. media reports have suggested the Pentagon is considering the possibility of arming ballistic missiles with conventional precision-guided warheads.

    "Arming strategic missiles with non-nuclear precision-guided warheads could seriously erode not only the international nuclear arms control regime but international security as a whole," Col. Gen. Nikolai Solovtsov said.

    He said the existing missile attack warning systems were unable to distinguish between a nuclear and conventionally armed ballistic missile, adding that a state receiving real-time data about a missile launch would proceed from the "worst-case scenario."

    With insufficient time for analysis of response options, that "could place mankind on the verge of a nuclear catastrophe," the general said.

    He also said that any new strategic arms deal with the United States had to take into account the minimum requirements of Russia's strategic nuclear forces.

    Solovtsov said Russia "must not go below the level of 1,500 nuclear warheads, but that is up to the country's political leadership to decide."

    Under the Strategic Arms Reductions Treaty (START I), which expires on December 5, Russia and the United States are to reduce their nuclear warheads to 6,000 and their delivery vehicles to 1,600 each. In 2002, a follow-up agreement on strategic offensive arms reduction was concluded in Moscow. The agreement, known as the Moscow Treaty, envisioned cuts to 1,700-2,200 warheads by December 2012.

    Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and U.S. President Barack Obama agreed during their London meeting in early April on an immediate start to talks on a new strategic arms reduction treaty.

    According to a report published by the U.S. State Department in April, as of January 1 Russia had 3,909 nuclear warheads and 814 delivery vehicles, including ground-based intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBM), submarine launched ballistic missiles (SLBM) and strategic bombers.

    The same report said the United States had 5,576 warheads and 1,198 delivery vehicles.

    Russia, which proposed a new arms reduction agreement with the United States in 2005, expects Washington to agree on a deal that would restrict not only the numbers of nuclear warheads, but also place limits on all existing kinds of delivery vehicles.

    Russian missile commander opposes conventional warheads on ICBMs | Top Russian news and analysis online | 'RIA Novosti' newswire
     
  9. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,267
    Location:
    011
    Russia test launches Topol missile to extend service life

    MOSCOW, April 10 (RIA Novosti) - Russia successfully test launched on Friday a Topol intercontinental ballistic missile to assess the possibility of extending its service life up to 22 years, a spokesman for the Strategic Missile Forces (SMF) said.

    "The dummy warhead has hit a designated target at the Kura testing grounds on the Kamchatka peninsula with the required precision," Col. Alexander Vovk said.

    The missile was in active service from 1987 until 2007, and deployed with the 54th Strategic Missile Division near the town of Teikovo, about 150 miles (240 km) northeast of Moscow.

    The successful test launch of the missile, from the Plesetsk space center in northern Russia, will allow the Topol's service life to be extended to 22 years, the spokesman said.

    The RS-12M Topol (SS-25 Sickle) is a single-warhead intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) approximately the same size and shape as the U.S. Minuteman ICBM. The first Topol missiles were put into service in 1985.

    The missile has a maximum range of 10,000 km (6,125 miles) and can carry a 550-kiloton nuclear warhead.

    Although the service life of the SS-25 was already extended to 21 years after a series of successful test launches last year, the missile will be progressively retired over the next decade and replaced by mobile Topol-M (SS-27 Stalin) missile systems.

    According to available data, Russia's SMF has a total of 541 ICBMs, including 306 Topol missiles and 59 Topol-M missiles.

    Russia test launches Topol missile to extend service life | Top Russian news and analysis online | 'RIA Novosti' newswire
     
  10. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,267
    Location:
    011
    Russia to improve missile defense penetration capability by 2016

    ALABANOVO (Moscow Region), June 10 (RIA Novosti) - Russia plans by 2016 to improve the ability of its range of ballistic missiles to overcome missile defenses, the Strategic Missile Forces (SMF) commander said on Wednesday.

    "By 2016, we will significantly modernize not only missile systems but also command-and-control systems in order to improve their ability to overcome missile defenses and increase the survivability of delivery vehicles," Col. Gen. Nikolai Solovtsov said at an SMF reserve command center.

    At present, six types of silo-based and mobile ICBM systems are on combat duty with the SMF, including the heavy Voyevoda (SS-18 Satan), capable of carrying 10 warheads, and the Topol-M (Stalin) systems.

    According to open sources, the total arsenal of Russia's SMF comprises 538 ICBMs, including 306 SS-25 Topol (Sickle) missiles and 56 SS-27 Topol-M missiles.

    Silo-based missiles constitute 45% of the total ballistic missile arsenal. They carry about 85% of nuclear warheads deployed by the SMF.

    Solovtsov earlier said Russia would put a regiment of new-generation RS-24 intercontinental ballistic missiles into service in December.

    RS-24 ICBMs, with multiple independently targetable reentry vehicle (MIRV) warheads, would help bolster the SMF's ability to overpower missile defense systems, "thus strengthening the nuclear deterrence potential of the Russian nuclear triad," the general said.

    The SMF will also adopt in the near future a third-generation command-and-control system to improve the launch and targeting procedures for ballistic missiles.

    "This system, apart from traditional tasks related to launch procedures, gathering of various data, and control over combat readiness of the launchers, will facilitate a quick response to changing deployment plans and quick retargeting of the missiles," Solovtsov said.

    Russia to improve missile defense penetration capability by 2016 | Top Russian news and analysis online | 'RIA Novosti' newswire
     

Share This Page