Russia hails Pakistan’s SCO bid

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by LurkerBaba, May 13, 2011.

  1. LurkerBaba

    LurkerBaba Staff Administrator

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    Is Russia giving an ultimatum to India? Is SCO redundant and belongs to the cold war times (like the NATO).

    Or has India again made a blunder : no strategic partner ship with America and left out of the SCO too
     
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  3. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    An Indian summer in Moscow for Zardari



    Vladimir Radyuhin


    Russian-Pakistani relations have recently acquired breathtaking dynamics. When Mr. Zardari meets Russian President Dmitry Medvedev on Thursday it will be their fifth meeting in the past three years, even if the four previous interactions were on the sidelines of multilateral forums.

    The current summit was prepared in record time: it was only last August that Mr. Medvedev extended an invitation to his Pakistani counterpart to come to Moscow. By comparison, it took the then President, Pervez Musharraf, years to get the Kremlin to act on its formal invitation to him. Russia then was still looking at Pakistan through India's eyes, and Mr. Musharraf's visit to Moscow in 2003 failed to break the ice. The current summit is different if only because the Kremlin has since de-hyphenated its relations with New Delhi and Islamabad.

    Pakistan has now taken centre stage in Russia's efforts to play a more active role in Central and South Asia as Moscow braces for the drawdown of U.S.-led coalition forces in Afghanistan.

    At a summit in Sochi last August, Russia institutionalised a quadripartite forum with Pakistan, Afghanistan and Tajikistan to counter the spread of drugs, terrorism and instability via Central Asia towards Russian borders. The four countries agreed to undertake joint economic projects in power generation, transport infrastructure and mining. At a follow-up meeting of economic Ministers in Moscow last October, the four discussed in greater detail plans to rebuild a trade Silk Route from former Soviet Central Asia via Afghanistan to Pakistan and export electricity from Tajikistan to Afghanistan and Pakistan. Russia confirmed its readiness to invest in the oil, gas and hydropower sectors of Afghanistan, Pakistan and Tajikistan.

    Energising economic ties

    In the past few months Moscow and Islamabad have prepared the ground for energising their flagging economic ties. The Inter-governmental Commission on Trade and Economic, Scientific and Technical Cooperation met for the first time in Moscow last September. Two months later Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin told his Pakistani counterpart Yousuf Raza Gilani at a Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) meeting in Dushanbe that Russia was willing to help fund and build the Turkmenistan-Afghanistan-Pakistan-India (TAPI) gas pipeline, to which Moscow was earlier opposed. During Mr. Zardari's visit the sides are expected to sign a memorandum of understanding for the modernisation and expansion of the Pakistan Steel Mills in Karachi, which the Soviet Union built in the 1970s, as well as five other MoUs for the supply of Russian rail tracks, cooperation in the oil and gas sector, power generation, coal mining and agriculture.

    The Pakistani President is arriving in Russia ten days after U.S. commandoes killed Osama bin Laden in Pakistan where he had enjoyed safe haven for years. However, Moscow made it clear this fact will not affect relations with Islamabad.

    “Russia fully recognises and appreciates the substantial contribution made by the Islamic Republic of Pakistan to the efforts of world community” in countering international terrorism, Russian Ambassador to Pakistan Andrey Budnik said in an article he penned several days after the operation in Abbottabad.

    The reason why Russia refused to join the U.S. in ostracising Islamabad is Afghanistan.

    “Russia attaches great importance to cooperation with Pakistan in the sphere of Afghan settlement,” Mr. Budnik wrote. He explained that this cooperation was based on a shared understanding that the quest for peace in Afghanistan “must not become the prerogative of solely external players”, an obvious reference to the U.S.

    Russia's veteran diplomat and orientalist Zamir Kabulov, appointed two months ago to the newly instituted post of the Kremlin representative for Afghanistan, immediately stated that Moscow is “open to dialogue” with those in the Taliban who are prepared to cut ties with al-Qaeda. Russia clearly counts on Pakistan to facilitate such dialogue. In return it promises to support Pakistan's bid to join the SCO.

    Pakistan, along with the other observer nations in the SCO, “has all the chances to become a full member of the organisation”, according to the Russia envoy to Islamabad.

    Mr. Zardari in return has offered to provide for Russia “access to warm seas”.

    All the settings are there that the current summit may be a momentous event not only for Russian-Pakistani relations, but for the entire region.


    The Hindu : Opinion / Op-Ed : An Indian summer in Moscow for Zardari



    Clearly Russia has dangled a lollipop to the Pakistanis to ensure their interests are looked after in Astan once the Americans leave.
     
  4. SpArK

    SpArK SORCERER Senior Member

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    Huh.. soon they will remove brazil from BRICS and maybe even introduce KSA / saudi arabia and call it PRICKS
     
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  5. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Pakistans vicious circle



    Russian-Pakistani relations, historically somewhat frosty, have recently improved. Little wonder then, that Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari’s visit to Moscow has attracted so much media attention. He met with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev twice during a four-party summit also attended by the presidents of Afghanistan and Tajikistan. The intrigue surrounding his current Moscow meeting lies in the crisis in relations between Pakistan and its main patron, the United States.

    When al Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden’s hideout was located 800 yards away from Pakistan’s Military Academy, Washington accused the country of double dealing. Pakistan’s leaders refuted the accusation, responding that U.S. Special Forces had conducted operations in their country without even notifying them.

    Pakistan itself is mired in political crisis and mutual (mis?)trust, which was already running low, has been dealt a heavy blow.

    Moscow’s interest in Pakistan has a certain logic to it, as the situation around Afghanistan, which determines the atmosphere in Central Asia, is becoming increasingly unpredictable. U.S. strategy there is vague, the situation inside Afghanistan is unstable, and the possibility of coordinating efforts with neighboring states remains unclear.

    The killing of the world’s most wanted man has only deepened uncertainty in the region. President Barack Obama now has a solid reason for pulling U.S. troops out, as the mission set a decade ago has been accomplished. But even if the pullout decision is taken (not everyone in Washington supports it), the United States will need Pakistan’s assistance to maintain control in Afghanistan, something that now looks increasingly unlikely.

    Afghanistan’s position is also shrouded in ambiguity. Afghan President Hamid Karzai has repeatedly said that Afghans must assume responsibility. After the operation in Abbottabad, 75 miles from Pakistan's capital Islamabad, he said it is no longer Afghanistan that is at the epicenter of the threat.
    But these are politically motivated statements. From a security standpoint, no one is confident that the Afghan authorities are capable of maintaining law and order without NATO and U.S. assistance. Afghans don’t want to see a repetition of what happened in 1992-1996, when the Soviet departure and the removal of the pro-Moscow Najibullah government left the country at the mercy of the Taliban. It became the scene of a bloody war in which everyone, including Pakistan, had some involvement.

    To Afghans, this is a worse option than continued occupation. This is why the idea of maintaining a reduced U.S. troop presence in Afghanistan, as Washington is considering, has engendered both disappointment(?) and a sense of relief in the country.
    Neighboring countries don’t want U.S. bases permanently deployed in Afghanistan. Russia, China, India and Iran have all supported a vague “regional” solution, advocating a reliance on Kabul rather than on Western troops.

    Zardari’s Moscow trip, made immediately after the strategic China-Pakistan consultations in late April and Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi’s visit to Moscow last week, is expected to boost the discussions.

    One of Moscow’s ideas for a regional solution involves an enhanced role for the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), the most representative organization in the region. During the upcoming SCO summit in Astana in June 2011, SCO states are expected to lift the unofficial moratorium on the admission of new members that was imposed in 2006. India and Pakistan are the most likely candidates. The group has refused to consider Iran’s admission request because the country is shackled by international sanctions.

    The possible admission of India and Pakistan is a delicate issue because of their tense bilateral relations. Russia would like to see India become a full member, while China prefers Pakistan. However, Moscow will only agree to that if India is also admitted.

    The Afghan question is perceived as something that has the potential to unite the SCO member states. The interests of India and Pakistan in the region are unlikely to coincide, but a multilateral format could ease their bilateral tensions by introducing external factors. Besides, if relations between Pakistan and the United States continue to deteriorate, Islamabad could be forced to be more active in diversifying its contacts.

    The interests of the army, religious and ethnic groups, and political leaders are all different pieces in one puzzle. They can fit together only if all sides join forces to create a sense of balance in Pakistan. But ever more people in Washington are urging that more pressure be put on Islamabad to force it to up the ante in its fight against the radicals.

    The United States has good reason to mistrust its Asian partner. At the same time, their policy toward Pakistan since fall 2001, when former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage said the United States would bomb Pakistan “back to the stone ages” unless it joined the fight against al Qaeda, has only served to undermine traditional ties and deepen instability in Pakistan.

    The Pakistani leadership’s efforts to reduce external pressure by diversifying its international contacts have provoked ire in Washington. At the same time, the United States has not offered it any other option and so Pakistan needs a fundamentally new paradigm to help it escape from this vicious circle.


    Uncertain World: Pakistan’s vicious circle | Columnists | RIA Novosti
     
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  6. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    India should join SCO there are better reasons than because Pakistan is joining. 2 good reasons are regional security and energy security. For regional security if USA does a cut and run in Afghanistan as it appears to be doing it will be in India's interests to join SCO. The strategic partnership hailed under Bush is gone under Obama, nothing seems to be on the horizon in terms of partnership with USA ;when USA has Pakistan as favorite non-NATO ally and China as the #1 trade partner it has been a fruitless effort upto now to expand the strategic partnership. USA 's influence has weakened allowing a Pak-China nuclear deal , Indian interests were never a priority for USA and with the MRCA humiliation and improving relations with Iran relations will flatline. The second energy security being better access and terms for gas Central Asian gas and possible better routes or pipelines??
     
  7. civfanatic

    civfanatic Retired Moderator

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    We should have joined SCO long ago.

    I agree with LFs post.
     
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  8. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Sab bakwas ha, zardari went for his personnel business deal for oil and coal. As he deals in oil and coal through his company based in Bermuda, West indies
     
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  9. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

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    Russians have asked both India and Pakistan.
    Can China make it tougher for India?

    Regards,
    Virendra
     
  10. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    How can russia forget that if this diseased pak land joined SCO. There will be more bomb attacks in Russia and moreover pak army suppports chehniyan and dagistan rebels which create trouble in russia
     
  11. cw2005

    cw2005 Regular Member

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    I fully support the notion of India joining SCO. It would provide a platform for China and India to iron out problems when both countries belong to the same organization and channel of dialogue would be always open. It might even pave the way for peace talk between India and Pakistan.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2011
  12. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    It's a wrong notion .....
     
  13. neo29

    neo29 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Russia will go all out in praising Pakistan coz of their interest in Afghan region. Not to mention they see Pak as their future customer in case India completely leans towards US and Europe.
     
  14. chex3009

    chex3009 Regular Member

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    Thats true, but what India needs to keep an eye is that we don't lean over to the US weaponry so much that it makes Russia angry and keep its economy going by such sales of weapons to the nation(Pakistan) which guarantees there will be no stoppage in demand of the military supplies from them.

    China is already supplying Pakistan with some weapons which are not as potent but can be dangerous as they are bought in numbers by the pakistanis.

    If this platform(SCO) helps in reducing tensions by bringing on interests of the region first, then India must join it and send the US back packing from Afghanistan.
     
  15. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    China shall support PAK's access to SCO. Believe Russia also knows well India wants sitting on the fence milking from both blocs like it did during Cold War era. Without India inside SCO, it remains simple and easier to "manage".
    Regret Sino-PAK relationship remains at a state level mostly. We shall encourage more people-to-people interactions and eco. cooperation. SCO plays a key role in China's energy security and PAK makes it complete with the gateway to Arab / Persian Gulf
     
  16. prototype

    prototype Regular Member

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    SCO is nothing more than an redundant organization,I see no reason why we join BRIC.
    What change had it brought to the global order after its inception.
    How is actually is changing the geopolitics.
    Its not a military organization,its even not an economic behemoth,except China and Russia (and to an extent Kazakhstan)no other mentionable members.

    Two of the member's are already present in BRIC(eventually the biggest members of SCO also).
    Their is no point forging multiple alliances with the same nation's again and again in the name of strategic relationships.
    I dont think anyway we can take this relation to a much higher point with Russia,and China does not anyway value Indian interest.

    The only member left is Kazakhstan with whom we already share good relation,I dont think we need a SCO to solidify the relation,the depth of the relation can be seen from the fact that now India is a supplier of civilian nuclear reactors to Kazakhstan.

    Currently a permanent energy route to central Asia is more important,and I dnt think if SCO can help it out.
     
  17. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Russians don't gift weapons or give soft loans.
     
  18. SpArK

    SpArK SORCERER Senior Member

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    Eeek.. too much movies it seems. The first thing that went to my mind when i saw this pic was of DOBBY, the elf, in Harry potter and him saying "dobby has come to serve his new master"...

    [​IMG]
     
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