Russia arrests Chinese trying to acquire S-300 repairing knowhow by bribing

Discussion in 'China' started by Armand2REP, Oct 5, 2011.

  1. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    Russia reveals arrest of Chinese man for espionage

    A Chinese man faces a charge in Russia of attempted spying for allegedly trying to gain details of a missile system through bribery. The man, identified as Tun Sheniyun, was arrested in Moscow on 28 October last year but his arrest was kept secret until now. He allegedly sought technological and repair documentation on the Soviet-era S300 surface-to-air system. The case surprised analysts, as Russia has already sold the system to China. Mr Tun is thought to have been acting on the instructions of the Chinese state security ministry, Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB) said. Formally, he worked as an interpreter for official delegations, it added. There was no immediate reaction to news from Chinese officials.

    'Mystifying'

    Fifteen S300 units were exported to China last year, Reuters news agency notes. In Russia itself, the S300 has been replaced with a newer system, the S400. The espionage charge carries a prison sentence of between 10 and 20 years, AFP news agency reports. Analysts told the agency they found the case mystifying because of both the delay in its announcement and the weapons system involved.

    BBC News - Russia reveals arrest of Chinese man for espionage

    :laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh::laugh:
     
    pmaitra, Pintu, Dovah and 3 others like this.
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  3. sandeepdg

    sandeepdg Senior Member Senior Member

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    Well, there's just so far that you can go by copying stuff ! It always had the potential to create problems, as it has done now. Russians are scared that the Chinese will copy the S-300, hence they might have decided to forget all about after sales support for the missiles sold by them to China.
     
  4. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    It makes you wonder how few of S-300 components really were cloned into the HQ-9. Everyone knows it is inferior but it must be wholly if they can't even figure out how to fix it. The differences are apparent...

     
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  5. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    It helps explain this video anyway...

     
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  6. niceguy2011

    niceguy2011 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Where is the video for 9/30 missile test?LOL
     
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  7. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    If Russia had sold the missiles, surely they would have given the training for repairs too!

    What other technology were they trying to obtain?
     
  8. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    Since they were hunting for repair documentation means they have broken systems and don't have any way to fix it without Russian teams.
     
  9. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Reverse engineering gone wrong.
     
  10. SPIEZ

    SPIEZ Senior Member Senior Member

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    Caan you tell me where the electronics for Russian air defense system come from ????
    And please dont tell me its Russia
     
  11. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    Belarus mostly....
     
  12. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    China in the Espionage Spotlight - ABC News

    China Still Spies the Old Fashioned Way, Russia Says

    [​IMG]

    S-300 long-range surface-to-air missile systems are involved in a joint military exercise held by Russian, Belarusian and Kazakhstanís Air Forces and Air Defense Forces at Ashuluk firing range in Russia?s Astrakhan Region. (Dmitry Rogulin/ITAR ?TASS via Newscom)

    By LEE FERRAN
    Oct. 6, 2011

    A day after a top American lawmaker accused China of exercising "an intolerable level" of espionage in the U.S., Russia's spy service announced it has detained a Chinese national for allegedly attempting to steal secrets about a Russian missile system.

    While the accusations out of the U.S. primarily refer to cyber intrusions of American corporations, the Russian government is accusing China of an old standby in the tradecraft playbook: outright bribery.

    Russia's secretive spy agency, the Federal Security Service (FSB), issued a rare statement Wednesday claiming the state had arrested a Chinese citizen who, posing as a translator for official delegations, was working under the direction of the Chinese government in an attempt to buy state secrets from Russians about Russia's S-300 missile system.

    The Chinese national, identified as Tong Shenyun, was reportedly detained last year but the arrest was not made public until earlier this week. Russia has already supplied the Chinese with the relatively dated missile system and Beijing has the license to manufacture it, Russian state news said, but the FSB accused Shenyun of trying to obtain "technical and repair documentation" about the system.

    The announcement of Shenyun's arrest came just hours after a top U.S. lawmaker in the House Intelligence Committee issued the strongest yet condemnation of China's alleged widespread cyber campaign against American corporations, which has allegedly reached into "nearly every sector" of U.S. industry.

    "I don't believe that there is a precedent in history for such a massive and sustained intelligence effort by a government agency to blatantly steal commercial data and intellectual property," House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.) said in an open committee meeting Tuesday. "Chinese espionage has reached an intolerable level. ... Beijing is waging a massive trade war on all of us."

    Rogers said that cyber intrusions of American and other Western corporations by hackers working behalf of Beijing -- allegedly including attacks on corporate giants like Google and Lockheed Martin -- amounted to "brazen and widespread theft."

    In one attack on Google, the company claimed Chinese hackers attempted to breach private emails of senior U.S. government officials, prompting Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to say the U.S. government was "very concerned" about the possible connection to China.

    In August, a documentary broadcast on Chinese state-run television showed what appeared to be a cyber attack in progress aimed at an I.P. address based at an Alabama university.

    The same month the documentary aired, U.S.-based cyber security giant McAfee released a report which it suggested a nation-state was likely behind "relentless" cyber attacks on up to 70 global companies, governments, and non-profit organizations over the last half-decade. Included in the list of victims was a U.S. satellite communication company, several defense contractors, real estate firms, the International Olympic Committee and several Asia-based targets -- but none based in China.

    Though China was not named as a suspect in the report, Chinese state-run media blasted its reasoning when responding to suggestions by other experts that China was the most likely culprit.

    "McAfee's new report alleges that 'a government' carried out a large-scale Internet espionage hacking action but its analysis of the justification is obviously groundless," China's People's Daily said.

    Chinese officials in the U.S. did not return requests for comments on this report, but, like in the case of the McAfee report, officials have repeatedly said the hacking accusations are "groundless."

    The Associated Press contributed to this report.
     

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