RTE discrimination against school run by hindus

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by sasi, Jan 27, 2015.

  1. sasi

    sasi Senior Member Senior Member

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    Imphal, January 25 2015:Reacting to the various news reports and allegations by Joint Student Coordination Committee (JSCC) about the imbroglio with Catholic Schools namely, St.
    Joseph's School (Sangaiprou), Little Flower School (Sangai-prou), Catholic School (Canchi-pur), Nirmalabas (M.G.Avenue), Catholic Edu-cational Society, Manipur (CESM) has categorically stated that it is a sad situation that this year too, the four mission schools are in the limelight regarding the Admission process.
    In a statement, CESM Director clarified that the mission schools in the plain and hills of Manipur are doing their best to impart education to all irrespective of caste, religion and gender.
    All Catholic Schools in the country come under the Catholic Education Commission, CBCI (Catholic Bishops Conference of India).
    The Government of India, National Commission for Minority Education Institutions, have declared the above schools thus "managed by the Catholic Educational Society, Manipur as minority educational institutions within the meaning of sections 2(g) of the National Commission for Minority Educational Institutions Act 2004.Consequently, the aforesaid schools are minority educational institutions covered under Article 30 of the constitution of India.
    The Director said CESM is of the opinion that non-compliance of the Supreme Court verdict for Minority Education Institutions may amount to contempt of court.
    Article 21 A Right to Education states� "The State shall provide free and compulsory education to all children of the age of six to fourteen years in such manner as the State may, by law, determine." "State" in Article 21A of the Constitution would not include private unaided educational intuitions or private individuals.
    In T.M.A.Pai Foundation (supra), the majority of the Judges have held that private unaided educational institutions impart education and that the State cannot take away the choice in matters of selection of students for admission and clause (5) of Article 15 of the Constitution in so far as it enables the State to take away this choice for admission of students is violative of freedom of private educational institutions under Article 19(1)(g) of the Constitution.
    Under Article 30(1) of the Constitution, all minorities, whether based on religion or language, shall have the right to establish and administer educational institutions of their choice.
    Religious and linguistic minorities, therefore, have a special constitutional right to establish and administer educational schools of their choice and this Court has repeatedly held that the State has no power to interfere with the administration of minority institutions and can make only regulatory measures and has no power to force admission of students from among non-minority communities, particularly in minority schools, so as to affect the minority character of the institutions.
    So, CESM is trying its best to follow the Supreme Court ruling.
    We would like to appeal to the general public to read us right and help us work better for quality education, the CESM Director added.

    http://t.co/Ud0vRoWNMT
     
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  3. DingDong

    DingDong Senior Member Senior Member

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    The definition of minority needs immediate revision. How can a Christian be minority in a Christian-majority state?
     
  4. sasi

    sasi Senior Member Senior Member

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    like mus in jk! Better amend law and leave all pvt schools out of it!

    Else current RTE,will encourage missionary activity covertly!
     
  5. Sambha ka Boss

    Sambha ka Boss Regular Member

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    Manipur is a Hindu majority state. Manipiri/Meitei are mainly Hindus, Nagas and other tribes of Manipur are mainly Christians.
     
  6. sasi

    sasi Senior Member Senior Member

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  7. sasi

    sasi Senior Member Senior Member

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  8. sasi

    sasi Senior Member Senior Member

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    Save Schools from the RTE

    Save Our Schools from the RTE | Swarajya

    The governments must open its eyes to private players in education sector and evolve meaningful regulations which enable good schools to continue functioning.
    As the Government of India kicks off the consultative process for the New Education Policy, several recommendations have come in from popular education columnists and policy advisers. They vary from restricting private investments in education to bringing in more accountability for government teachers. In higher education, there have been voices demanding further deregulation of the sector or seeking a complete overhaul of the regulatory mechanism. But there is one issue which has been completely left out – the state of low-cost private schools in India.
    Thanks to the failure of the state to provide quality education to children and the aspirations of the poor, several low-cost private schools have mushroomed in India. These schools are typically situated in poor neighbourhoods and teach children for a very small fee. The poor find them affordable, and with the quality of education in many of these schools better than the nearest government school, parents prefer to send their children to these schools.
    Some of these schools are run by social entrepreneurs who have developed a smart business model to keep the school going by charging a small fee and seeking donations from various charities and individuals. Thousands of such schools have come up over the years. India Institute’s study of low cost private schoolsin Patna, Bihar is hard proof of the positive impact of these schools on our education system.
    There was one problem which most of these schools were facing – they were not being ‘recognized’ by the respective state governments. The archaic rules and regulations governing the recognition process are so restrictive that they can only be satisfied by schools with huge initial capital. That left these low-cost private schools with two options, either bribe the officers of education department to get a recognition certificate, or continue running the schools without recognition. Parents were satisfied, the children were learning and they were happy to provide a service which was in short-supply. That was till the Right to Education Actkicked in.
    The Right to Education Act made it illegal to operate ‘unrecognized’ schools. This has lead to the shutting down of several such schools. According to estimates by India Institute, nearly 3000 unrecognized schools have been shut down by the government since RTE was enacted. Further, at least 14,000 have been given notice to shut down. Several of these schools are low-cost quality private schools. How many exactly? Nobody knows, and the government is making no effort to find out. It is left to the civil society to fight for these schools.
    As we speak, India Instituteis running a campaign to save one such school in New Delhi. Deepalaya School, Sanjay Colony, which has been educating poor children in the slum for more than 20 years now, is beingforced to shut down. The Delhi School Education Act requires that recognized schools run on land owned by the management, but they operate on land belonging to the Delhi Slum Board. Since RTE hascriminalizedthe operation of unrecognised schools, the school has been shut down, and now just operates a tuition center for poor kids as requested by their parents. Students from higher classes have either dropped out, or are forced to study in a government school which is in a pathetic condition.
    A short video we have produced shows the plight of the schools and what the community in Sanjay Colony stands to lose due to the government’s action. The #SaveDeepalay a campaignis online and we are requesting everybody to sign the petition here.
    The fight for the rights of the poor children and their right to get quality education is not an easy one. But a journey of a thousand miles begins with one step, and#SaveDeepalayacampaign is the first step towards securing the future of our education system. We need an education policy that enables the poor, not create more problems for them. And for this, the governments must open its eyes to private players in education sector and evolve meaningful regulations which enable good schools to continue functioning.
    A short video about Deepalaya has been included below.
     
  9. sasi

    sasi Senior Member Senior Member

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  10. sasi

    sasi Senior Member Senior Member

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  11. sasi

    sasi Senior Member Senior Member

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  12. Free Karma

    Free Karma Senior Member Senior Member

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    Karnataka passes amendment making Kannada or mother tongue mandatory as medium of instruction under RTE - The Economic Times

    Basically if you want to study in english medium, go to minority schools. Why make this rule on for non minority schools?
     

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