Royal Australian Navy Air Warfare Destroyer gun mounts have arrived

Discussion in 'Indo Pacific & East Asia' started by Someoneforyou, Jul 27, 2011.

  1. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Air Warfare Destroyer gun mounts have arrived
    AUSTRALIA - 27 JULY 2011

    The Minister for Defence Materiel Jason Clare announced in Adelaide today that the $8 billion Air Warfare Destroyer project has taken delivery of three main gun mounts of the Air Warfare Destroyers.

    The gun mounts, manufactured by BAE Systems in the United States, are valued at $80 million and will be placed into a controlled storage facility in Adelaide until they are installed on HMA Ships Hobart, Brisbane and Sydney.

    “The guns will be able to hit targets on land, air and at sea. They are capable of firing both Royal Australian Navy standard munitions and future extended range munitions,” Mr Clare said.

    Similar gun mounts are installed on the Royal Australian Navy’s ANZAC Class frigates, the US Navy’s Arleigh Burke Class destroyers, the Spanish F-100 frigates and on ships within the South Korean, Japanese and Danish navies.

    More than 1,000 people are currently working on the construction of the ships across three shipyards in Australia; at ASC in South Australia, Forgacs in New South Wales and BAE Systems in Victoria.

    “This is an important project for the Australian Defence Force. These destroyers will be among the most advanced and capable warships in the world,” Mr Clare said.



    Source: Australian Department of Defence
     
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  3. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Royal Australian Navy - Hobart Class Air Warfare Destroyers (AWDs):

    The Hobart Class air warfare destroyers (AWDs) will be capable across the full spectrum of joint maritime operations, from area air defence and escort duties, right through to peacetime national tasking and diplomatic missions. The AWD project will provide the Royal Australian Navy with one of the world's most capable multi-mission warships.

    The AWDs, equipped with the SM-2 missile, will provide air defence for accompanying ships in addition to land forces and infrastructure in coastal areas, and for self-protection against missiles and aircraft. They will also be equipped with the SM-6 long-range anti-aircraft missile, the most advanced weapon of its type, with a range of more than 370 kilometres. The missiles combined with the Aegis Weapon System, incorporating the state-of-the-art phased array radar AN/SPY 1D(V), will effectively extend the air defence protection offered by these superior ships.

    The AWDs will carry a helicopter for surveillance and response to support key warfare areas. The surface warfare function will include long-range anti-ship missiles and a naval gun capable of firing extended range munitions in support of land forces.

    As they enter service, the AWDs will be equipped with a sophisticated Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC), which will enable each vessel to act as a part of a wider 'grid' of sensor and weapon platforms that can share surveillance and targeting information.

    The Hobart Class AWDs will also conduct undersea warfare and be equipped with modern sonar systems, decoys, surface-launched torpedoes and an array of effective close-in defensive weapons.

    These capabilities will ensure the AWDs have the layered defensive and offensive capability required to counter conventional and asymmetic threats.



    Source: ASC Pty Ltd
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2011
  4. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    [​IMG]


    Computer-generated impression of the future Royal Australian Navy Hobart class Air warfare destroyers (HMAS Hobart, HMAS Brisbane, HMAS Sydney).
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    SM-6 Missile illustration. Standard Missile 6 (SM-6) is a missile that has just gone into production for the U.S. Navy and the Royal Australian Navy.
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    File Photo: A RIM-66 (Standard Missile) being assembled.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2011
  5. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Mk 45 Mod 4 Naval Gun:

    The Mk 45 Mod 4 provides a range in excess of 21 nautical miles (= 38 kilometers) with current non-assisted ammunition. When the new extended range munitions would be available the maximum range of the Mk 45 Mod 4 naval guns will be extended to 60 nautical miles (= 111 kilometers).

    The Mk 45 mod 4 includes a 62 calibers barrel, strengthened gun chamber, lengthened recoil stroke and an interactive touch-screen control system. The Mod 4 also includes a reduced radar signature and full compatibility for the ERGM family of munitions.


    [​IMG]

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  6. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    1st Keel Block Delivered for New Australian Warship
    AUSTRALIA - 18 AUGUST 2011

    Minister for Defence Materiel Jason Clare today announced the delivery to Adelaide of the first keel block that will be used to construct HMAS Hobart - Australia's first Air Warfare Destroyer.

    "This is an important step forward in the $8 billion project to construct three new warships," Mr Clare said.

    Construction of the AWDs involves 90 separate steel blocks being built at shipyards in Adelaide (ASC), Melbourne (BAE Systems), Newcastle (Forgacs) and Ferrol, Spain (Navantia).

    Three sonar blocks are being constructed in Spain and the United Kingdom.

    "Approximately 70 blocks will be shipped to Adelaide over the next four years where they will be consolidated into three new warships," Mr Clare said.

    Over the next six months it is expected that six blocks will be delivered from Melbourne and Newcastle to Adelaide.

    This first block weighs around 180 tonnes. It is 18 metres long, 16 metres wide and five metres high and will form part of the keel of HMAS Hobart.

    It was loaded on to a barge at BAE System's Melbourne shipyard on 11 August.

    The barge was towed by tug boat to the Common User Facility in Adelaide arriving on 15 August.

    Last night it was removed from the barge and transported by a large multi-wheeled vehicle to the pre-fit-out facility.

    Further work on the block including blast and paint, fitting pipes, installing communications and electrical cables and fitting internal walls will now be completed.

    Two other hull blocks are currently being prepared for shipment from Melbourne to Adelaide.

    Construction has begun on all main blocks for the first ship and work has also begun on blocks for the second ship, HMAS Brisbane.

    Next year work will begin on blocks for the third ship, HMAS Sydney and the first ship will start to be consolidated in Adelaide.

    Mr Clare thanked the more than 1,000 people currently working on the ships across the three Australian shipyards.

    In May, the Government announced that the AWD Alliance had reallocated construction work on the project to reduce the schedule risk to both the AWD and Landing Helicopter Dock ship projects.

    "The delivery of the first keel block is an important step forward in this project," Mr Clare said.


    [​IMG]



    Source: Ministry of Defence Australia
     

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