Road trouble in China

Discussion in 'China' started by Daredevil, Dec 30, 2012.

  1. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Chinese quality of Roads :laugh::rofl::taunt:

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    Gas leaks after a sinkhole nearly 10 meters wide broke three gas pipes and a water pipe in Taiyuan, capital of Shanxi province, on Wednesday.

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    Firefighters dilute gas that leaked after a sinkhole nearly 10 meters wide broke three gas pipes and a water pipe in Taiyuan, capital of Shanxi province, on Wednesday

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  3. trackwhack

    trackwhack Tihar Jail Banned

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    Lol

    Did somebody ask for a light?
     
  4. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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  5. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Wow, it looks like quality is very low across the board.

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  6. cinoti

    cinoti Tihar Jail Banned

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    it is due to a collapse of an underground air shelter built in the 1960s to fence off Soviet air raid.
     
  7. cinoti

    cinoti Tihar Jail Banned

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    it shows how little you know about China, this road has always been there and it has nothing to do with the construction quality, a 50 years old public air shelter collapsed beneath it. Taiyuan sits on Huangtu (loess) Plateau, a perfect geographic location for digging up deep caves, during the standing off with Soviets in the 1960s and 1970s, Taiyuan dug miles of miles this kind of shelter to fence off soviet air raid, some of the tunnels dug out in such a hurry, that within months, several hundred kilometers were combat ready. by the way,Taiyuan is a heavy industrial hub with many defense industries, it is on the top list of Soviet nuclear strike. Now, after 50 years, some of the old tunnel is aging off without proper care, thus caused this accident, a waking up call though, China enjoyed too long peace time, it is high time for it to reinforce its war readiness.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2012
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  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Mao is to blame for the rad collapse?

    Well, Mao was only 30% wrong.

    The way China is at it, you are sure right.

    It must get ready and have more shelters!

    And shelters that don't collapse just because it rained!
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
  9. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Only a brain dead person would lay a road on such hollow spaces without proper foundation.
     
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  10. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    A glimpse of the shoddy construction of China.

    I was remined of this when I say this justification of road collapse because it was 50 year old and also the showcasing of that fabulous long bridge which Cinoti took umbrage that I wrote also about the Mumbai bridge.

    Look At All The Major Chinese Bridges That Have Collapsed In The Recent Years

    Read more: Look At All The Major Chinese Bridges That Have Collapsed In The Recent Years - Business Insider


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    Earlier this month, a bridge in Harbin city that cost 1 billion yuan to make collapsed killing 3 people.
    But as many as six bridges have collapsed across China since July 2011, and most have been attributed to poor construction and overloading, according to The Telegraph.
    We drew on various news reports and a recent post from Wall Street Examiner's Russ Winter to put together images of major bridge collapses in the past five years.

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    June 15, 2007: A section of Jiujiang Bridge collapsed after it was hit by a boat in south China's Guangdong province


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    August 16, 2007: An overloaded truck carrying iron powder caused a bridge to collapse in Taiyuan, Shanxi province


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    March 27, 2008: A 60-meter section of Jintang Bridge fell onto a cargo ship near the eastern port of Ningbo, east of China's Zhejiang Province



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    July 14, 2011: The Wuyishan Gongguan Bridge in China's Fujian province collapsed, killing one and injuring 22 others


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    A different angle shows just how extreme the collapse was...


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    July 15, 2011: The Number 3 Qiantang River Bridge collapsed under the weight of a truck that was carrying over 100 tons of steel plates

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    July 19, 2011: The Baihe Bridge in Huairou District, Beijing collapsed under the weight of a 46-foot long truck

    Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/china-bridge-collapses-2012-8?op=1#ixzz2GZMqTPNp
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
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  11. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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  12. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Of course, the Chinese posters do not remember these.
     
  13. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    China’s Bridge Collapse: Infrastructure Boom Raises Safety Questions

    China’s roads are notoriously dangerous. That point was reiterated Sunday as 47 people died in two traffic accidents, including 36 who were killed in Shaanxi province, when a sleeper bus rear-ended a tanker truck loaded with methanol, and another 11 who died in a collision in Sichuan province. The weekend’s road death toll was startling, but the collisions had a grim familiarity: loaded vehicles colliding on rural highways, apparently due to driver negligence, with horrible consequences. Indeed, Monday morning saw yet another crash between a van and a truck that killed at least nine. So perhaps it was understandable that much of the domestic media attention focused on an accident that had a comparatively small death toll but raised the specter of a growing concern on China’s roads: the parlous state of the infrastructure itself.

    In the northeastern city of Harbin a bridge ramp collapsed on Friday, killing three and injuring five. The collapse was particularly shocking because the Yangmingtan Bridge was built at a cost of $300 million less than a year ago, raising questions about whether corners were cut in its construction. The bridge failure was blamed on overloaded trucks, but the government is now carrying out a more detailed investigation into the cause. Chinese newspaper editorials and online comments have called for answers as to why the bridge collapsed and who should take responsibility. Harbin officials were forced to deny claims that they couldn’t track down the contractors who built the bridge and said the names would be made public after an official investigation concluded.

    (MORE: Picking Quarrels, Disturbing Traffic and Vacation: The Creative Excesses of the Chinese Legal System)

    The collapse is particularly worrisome because it follows several similar recent infrastructure failures. The Beijing News reports it was at least the seventh bridge to collapse in little over one year. That follows a building boom, driven in part by the economic-stimulus package launched in late 2008. More than a third of the $586 billion package was budgeted for infrastructure development. With a huge population and years of economic growth, China often seems to be bursting at the seams. Its roads, trains and subways are frequently overcrowded, and infrastructure development is sorely needed. The government says it plans to increase the nation’s highway system by 50% from 2 million km in 2008 to 3 million km in 2020. In places like the southern province of Guizhou, China’s poorest region, the stimulus helped the construction of the Baling River Bridge, which shortened the traverse of a river valley from an hour on winding roads to a matter of minutes. Around Beijing, mountain villages now enjoy smooth new highways linking them to the city center. But the Chinese capital’s infrastructure hasn’t aged gracefully. Heavy rainfall in July killed at least 77 people in Beijing — 11 of them drowned as their vehicles were trapped in flooded roadways. Sinkholes have sprouted around the city. Rural highways in the Fangshan district, which was hardest hit by flooding, and the Pinggu district, north of town, still have large sections missing a month after the deluge.

    The sudden collapse of the Harbin bridge has raised questions about corruption and possible shortcuts taken in an effort to build so much so quickly. While the risk of crashes on China’s roads is numbingly constant, the fear of road collapses is a new and dramatic worry that likely outstrips the actual danger. “This is the national condition,” Li Chengpeng, a journalist and commentator, wrote on his blog on Monday. “I’ve seen a lot of people are now worried about their safety crossing bridges, wishing each one would have a Spider-Man underneath guarding it.” Similar questions were raised last year about China’s rapid expansion of its high-speed rail network after a crash near the city of Wenzhou killed 40. That accident was blamed on a lightning strike, but the safety of the system as a whole was called into question by the earlier dismissal of the Railway Minister Liu Zhijun for corruption.



    Read more: China: Bridge Collapse Raises Questions About Infrastructure Safety | TIME.com
     
  14. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    China - the country that can make the world's largest armchair (but where the motorways collapse just TEN MONTHS after being built)

    China's economy is continuing to grow at breakneck speed but - as these pictures show - the giant nation's infrastructure is quite literally buckling under the strain.
    At least three people were killed and five injured when this motorway bridge in Heilongjiang province in north east China collapsed today sending four huge trucks crashing 100ft to the ground below.

    The tragedy comes after what is claimed to be the world's largest 'sofa chair' was unveiled in Shanghai - showcasing the more positive side of China's incredible economic growth.

    The bridge collapse is one of a number of horrifying accidents on China's expanding road and rail networks in recent years - leading to fears that safety is being sacrificed for the speed of construction.

    Four trucks crashed to the ground, crushing their occupants and sending their loads spilling across the ground.

    The tragedy comes just ten months after the multimillion pound roadway was constructed and was one of two transport disasters to hit the province this week, with a train crash at a railway station on Thursday also injuring at least 24 people.

    Xinhua news agency said it was at least the sixth major bridge collapse across the country since July last year - fuelling fears over the safety of China's fast-expanding infrastructure.

    But despite fears about its infrastructure, China continues to amaze the world with the sheer scale of its economic growth.

    And nothing could symbolise this expansion better than the world's largest armchair, which has been put on display in a Shanghai department store.

    The massive seat, which stands nearly 22ft tall and 25ft wide can be turned into a stage for performances at the weekend.

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    Why the chair was made - other than to show off China's phenomenal economy - is not entirely known[/B]

    More at
    Made in China: Motorway collapses 10 months after it is built - but they manage to build world's largest armchair | Mail Online
     
  15. cinoti

    cinoti Tihar Jail Banned

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    Don't understand your logic, why shall I blame Mao, he did what he needed to do --- Safeguard his people by digging up some air shelter.
    it is already 50 years old without any maintenance, that is something China needs to blame itself.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
  16. cinoti

    cinoti Tihar Jail Banned

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    the shelter was dug after the road was built, Taiyuan is a city of 2000 years history, even it changed a lot, that street is always there, the south bound extension of this road actually was the only way out in the ancient times for people to travel outside of
    Taiyuan basin. Even the road name suggests it was a least there since Tang Dynasty. The modern version of this road has been there since the 1950s.
    and the tunnel was not dug directly under it. Actually that part of the under ground shelter has been deserted since the 1980s.
    the collapse of the shelter indirectly caused the slide of the road foundation thus brought up this whole news to make you guys excited.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2012
  17. cinoti

    cinoti Tihar Jail Banned

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    So what, their own Big-dig tunnel collapse, Japanese highway bridge collapse, South korean mall collapse, what conclusion can you draw from there?
     
  18. opesys

    opesys Regular Member

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    what conclusion to draw ?hmmm... to see if Chinese companies were involved in the construction of Japanese highway, South Korean mall :troll:
     
  19. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Let me explain the logic since you are naturally conveniently not wanting to acknowledge that you all are like the 'world largest armchair' manufacturer. Attempting to showing off when actually you are hollow and impressive momentarily till the catastrophe hits you with shoddy construction just to keep to the Communist Govt deadline in its showcasing showing off schedule.

    Next, you all are most disingenuous when 'caught out' and your claims of grandeur is proved to be hollow.

    Indeed there will be collapses of infrastructure all over the world, but their citizens will not trot out silly and lame excuses to cover up their loss of face. Instead, they will face it boldly and accept.

    However f you have seen the photos of Past#9, you will find the slight difference between China and other countries.

    China is displaying SUCCESSIVE construction failure i.e. one after the other.

    The reason is simple. In the hurry to showoff, the constructions are hollow, flimsy and disastrous!

    Now, take and aspirin and go off to sleep!
     
  20. cinoti

    cinoti Tihar Jail Banned

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    Quality accusation coming from an Indian, best joke of the year..heheh...
     
  21. cinoti

    cinoti Tihar Jail Banned

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    Thank you for taking all asians as chinese, we are marching towards this goal.haha .
     

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