Rise of Russia(?)

Discussion in 'Europe and Russia' started by nrupatunga, Nov 26, 2013.

  1. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    A very very interesting read.

    Russia's turnaround in the Middle East
     
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  3. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    Kuwait eyeing up Russian weapons - foreign minister
    What the F is this?? GCC looking for non-western that too russian arms:confused::shocked::cool2: Couldn't stop posting all 3 smileys here. Folks please don't say now that this is isn't the 1st time this is happening. Have west(read usa) really pi**ed gcc now or is it just that these camel herders pleading west not to leave them in desert.
     
  4. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    Russia is not trying to be 'some kind of superpower,' Vladimir Putin says
     
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  5. jmj_overlord

    jmj_overlord Regular Member

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    change in US policy towards iran and egypt prompted the middle east to warm up towards russia, right ? seems like nowadays many allies seem to lose trust in US
     
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  6. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    I have something in store about the Economic Rise of Russia as below. i hope it would make this thread more interesting :thumb:

     
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  7. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Russia’s economy under Vladimir Putin

    Vladimir Putin was elected President of Russia on March 26, 2000, and was re-elected to a second term on March 14, 2004. On May 8, 2008, he was appointed Prime Minister by presidential executive order.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    16 May 2000

    President of Russia


    Economic history of the Russian Federation 2000-2007

    Russia posted gross domestic product growth of 6.4% in 1999, 10% in 2000, 5.1% in 2001, 4.7% in 2002, 7.3% in 2003, 7.2% in 2004, 6.4% in 2005, 8.2% in 2006 and 8.5% in 2007[9] with industrial sector posting high growth figures as well.
    Главная::Федеральная служба государственной статистики

    Under the presidency of Vladimir Putin Russia's economy saw the nominal Gross Domestic Product (GDP) double, climbing from 22nd to 11th largest in the world.[/COLOR] The economy made real gains of an average 7% per year (2000: 10%, 2001: 5.1%, 2002: 4.7%, 2003: 7.3%, 2004: 7.2%, 2005: 6.4%, 2006: 8.2%, 2007: 8.5%, 2008: 5.6%), making it the 6th largest economy in the world in GDP(PPP). In 2007, Russia's GDP exceeded that of 1990, meaning it has overcome the devastating consequences of the Soviet era, 1998 financial crisis, and preceding recession in the 1990s. :russia:

    During Putin's eight years in office, industry grew by 75%, investments increased by 125%,[10] and agricultural production and construction increased as well. Real incomes more than doubled and the average salary increased eightfold from $80 to $640.[11][12][13]:thumb: The volume of consumer credit between 2000–2006 increased 45 times,[14][15] and during that same time period, the middle class grew from 8 million to 55 million, an increase of 7 times. The number of people living below the poverty line also decreased from 30% in 2000 to 14% in 2008.[10][16][17]

    Economic history of the Russian Federation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    => The Putin's Era of Russia is highlighted as below: :ranger:

    [​IMG]

    => Government Debt To GDP - Countries - List


    => the Chart Below puts Russian Per Capita Income in the same category of many Western European Countries like Italy, Spain etc., while they are heavily indebted too :thumb:

    [​IMG]


    => also we find Ruble value stabilized since 2000 itself, as below:

     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2013
  8. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    Russia makes huge investment

    An ambitious programme in Russia to remake or modernise the crumbling Soviet-era roads, railways, bridges and ports is under way.

    Between $60bn (£39bn) and $65bn (£42bn) is being invested each year on major renovation projects across the country – not that you’d notice if you visit Russia’s regional capitals, which still look drab and run-down, bar a few brightly coloured billboards. That’s because most of the money is going into transport and power systems – the lifeblood of this vast but largely empty country.

    Infrastructure investment in Russia in 2010 reached $111bn (£72bn), according to a report by Morgan Stanley, a 10-fold increase from the $7bn spent in 1999. :thumb:

    Commentators regularly attack the Kremlin’s “spending frenzy”, claiming it has driven up the oil price needed to balance the budget to over $125 a barrel – from $21 in 2007, based on Citigroup figures.

    But they don’t seem to acknowledge that, rather than propping up struggling factories or paying public servants, the money is going on much-needed infrastructure projects.

    And, when set against the rapidly expanding economy, the spending splurge is not that much: as a share of GDP it has doubled from 3.5pc of GDP in 1999 to 7pc in 2010 – slightly ahead of India’s 6pc, but well behind China’s 11pc. :thumb:

    What’s more, it isn’t just the federal government making the investment, but state-owned companies, many of which are now on the privatisation list. Over half of all infrastructure investment (3.7pc of GDP) was made by just eight large state-owned companies, while federal budget spending accounted for only 1.8pc, according to Morgan Stanley.

    The real boom in infrastructure spending, though, has not even begun. A host of mega-projects are being prepared that will push the spending even higher over the next couple of years.

    Among the biggest projects planned are the development of the Vankor oil and gas field, the biggest find in Russia in the past 25 years; the Ust-Luga port in the Gulf of Finland that will be the biggest warm-water port in Russia; the reconstruction of the Black Sea resort of Sochi ahead of the 2014 Winter Olympics; and the construction of the East Siberia-Pacific Ocean (Espo) oil pipeline.

    Morgan Stanley estimates that a total of $500bn worth of infrastructure projects are underway or about to start.

    “Based on our major projects database, we see a steady $60bn-$65bn [per year] flow of infrastructure capital expenditure on major projects, and a new generation of mega-projects under development, including high- speed rail, new federal highways, the Moscow transport hub and further development of the Yamal oil and gas province,” says Jacob Nell, chief economist of Morgan Stanley and author of the report.

    To sustain this high level of development, Mr Nell estimates state-owned companies will have to raise another $28bn a year to finance the work – about as much as Russia attracts in foreign 
direct investment.

    What is odd is that much of this work has gone unnoticed. This is partly because the spending has not had much impact on the country’s growth or overall investment – both are now lower than before the financial crisis began. And because the more opaque state-owned companies are in the front line, their spending is harder to see than federal budget spending or privately funded investment.

    But perhaps the biggest factor is that, unlike China and India, which were both largely agrarian economies, Russia inherited a lot of serviceable infrastructure from the Soviet era. :cool2: In the boom years of the Seventies, when the workers’ paradise looked like it might actually happen, Kremlin spending on infrastructure averaged 40pc of GDP a year. It was only in the Nineties that it fell away to next to nothing. :ranger:

    “Russia inherited significant elements of a modern industrial infrastructure from the Soviet Union, including an oil and gas industry, a mining industry, a railway network, a power network, and urban transport and municipal services. However, the infrastructure was often inefficient, and there were notable gaps, particularly in telecommunications and transport,” says Mr Nell.

    Russia makes huge investment in transport networks - Telegraph
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2013
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  9. Austin

    Austin Regular Member

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    Its better not to be a Superpower that has too many stigma attached to it but work with like minded nations like BRICS and other for upholding UN laws and right which in past 2 decades US and its western allies have taken for a ride
     
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  10. Austin

    Austin Regular Member

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  11. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    we have a military strength comparison as below too. its the most recognized source in this regard, even if reliability of these sources is always on question. :ranger:

    => Global Firepower Military Ranks - 2013

    here, PwrIndx of US at 0.2475 is sharp fall of "comparative" military strength of US. Russia at 0.2618 is very closed to it also. i remember, PwrIndx of US was very high in 2003-05, at around 0.13, can anyone confirm it?
     
  12. hello_10

    hello_10 Tihar Jail Banned

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    double post
     
  13. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    Russia's Middle East Chess Game
     
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  14. Austin

    Austin Regular Member

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    Just to give an idea how much reserves does Arctic Hold from Official Russian Government

    Russia's Arctic holds 100 Bln tons of oil, gas

    Russia's Arctic holds 100 Bln tons of oil, gas


    100 billion Tons is 714 Billion Barrel of Oil Equivalent ( bboe )
     
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  15. Austin

    Austin Regular Member

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  16. nrupatunga

    nrupatunga Senior Member Senior Member

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    Not sure if this is the right thread. But this combo will shape european geo-politics in the coming years: either for good or for for worse.

    Get Ready for a Russo-German Europe
     
  17. jmj_overlord

    jmj_overlord Regular Member

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    with russia having such large reserves of natural gas, isn't imposing sanctions on them by the west a foolish move ?
     
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  18. Jagdish58

    Jagdish58 Regular Member

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    I would credit Putin for Russian growth & agressive posture , If you give Russia to Manmohan singh or Sonia gandhi or AK antony or Chindambaram to govern will they take russia to super power status?? noooooooooooo:laugh: If the leader is firm & agressive on foreign policy then country will prosper both militarily or economically:thumb:
     
  19. happy

    happy Senior Member Senior Member

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  20. thethinker

    thethinker Senior Member Senior Member

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    Absolutely. The plan to isolate Russia has backfired. With Crimea under Russian control, an even larger pool of natural gas fields is now directly controlled by Russia.

    All the West has done is provoke a trade war for natural gas with EU and US on one side while Russia and allies (including India) on other. Looks like someone has over-estimated their own capabilities of exporting gas (read " fracking") by a long shot. This whole dog-pony show if was designed to displace Russia from being the main exporter of natural gas globally will actually end up burning West very badly in future.
     
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  21. Ankit Purohit

    Ankit Purohit Senior Member Senior Member

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