Right to Service(RTS):Nitish moots law to make babus do their jobs

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by S.A.T.A, Dec 2, 2010.

  1. S.A.T.A

    S.A.T.A Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2009
    Messages:
    1,804
    Likes Received:
    453
    Right to Service(RTS):Nitish moots law to make babus do their jobs

    PATNA: In a novel move, the Nitish Kumar government has mooted a legislation to guarantee right to service (RTS) to the citizens so as to curb corruption in the bureaucracy. "We are working on the draft Bill which would be tabled in the House in the next session,'' Kumar said on Tuesday.

    The idea is to create a healthy work culture in the state offices. Officials and employees not doing their job within a timeframe would be fined. "The fine will be deducted from their salary,'' he said. CM had pledged to take on the corrupt as his first priority on returning to power.
     
  2.  
  3. abirbec04

    abirbec04 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2010
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    8
    Nitish is my hero ....... way to go Nitish ... we are all with you. :emot112:
     
  4. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    5,711
    Likes Received:
    723
    Location:
    Bihar, BanGalore , India
    Actually he already started this culture in secretariat in his last term.secretariat was his first target as its heart oif state management . their working hours as well as improved . I know it because my friends father is in secretariat and now its term to improve work culture at block level. Good step to bring the house back in order .
     
  5. S.A.T.A

    S.A.T.A Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2009
    Messages:
    1,804
    Likes Received:
    453
    Don't promise what you can't deliver

    Riding on the back of the mandate given by voters in Bihar, the Nitish Kumar government has mooted a legislation to guarantee right to service (RTS) to the citizens. Given the fact that India's bureaucracy is plagued with problems, Nitish's idea will find an instant constituency. However, can we remain unmindful of the inadvertent and disastrous consequences of such a law?

    To start with, such a law could become a tool in the hands of vested interests to pressurise and frame honest officers who might be working in public interest. In that sense, it comes at the cost of civil servants' independence and good judgment. Also, under particular situations, it is quite possible that an individual officer in charge may have failed due to reasons beyond his control. There could be a shortage of resources or lack of inter-departmental coordination, which might have led to the situation. How and at what level do we intend to fix accountability in such cases? What kind of redressal mechanisms will such a law put in place? If citizens are empowered to seek judicial remedy under this law, then we are imposing another challenge on our courts to deliver when they are already overburdened.

    An obvious question that arises is whether more laws and agencies can curb corruption and improve governance. Nitish's inspiration for RTS comes from Madhya Pradesh government's Public Service Guarantee Act 2010, which has been enacted on the pattern of Right to Information Act 2005. But there's little point in creating laws that can't be implemented on the ground, when the primary focus should be on delivery and executive performance. It is time we strengthen and improve the existing checks and balances mechanisms such as RTI, consumer courts and the judiciary.
     

Share This Page