Red tape, politics dither scientists- Nobel Winner Venkatraman Ramakrishnan

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by Sridhar, Dec 23, 2009.

  1. Sridhar

    Sridhar House keeper Moderator

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    'Red tape, politics dither scientists from returning home'


    2009-12-22 18:33:32
    Last Updated: 2009-12-22 19:20:01

    Chennai: Calling for "autonomy from red tape and local politics" in India, Nobel laureate Indian-American scientist Venkataraman Ramakrishnan on Tuesday said many scientists of Indian origin may return home if the government made "attractive offers" to undertake research in science.
    "We should give a lot of autonomy from bureaucracy, from red tape and from local politics so that they (Indian origin scientists) can come. What they like to do is science," Ramakrishnan, winner of Nobel Prize for Chemistry, told reporters here.

    He said bureaucracy and politics were the dithering factors for the Indian scientists to return home.

    Since there was "too much" of bureaucracy and intervention of local politics in India, many scientists of Indian origin living especially in the West were reluctant to come, he added.

    "Make it attractive enough then they will continue to do good science while being in India. Then many of them might return", he said suggesting that Indian government take cue from its Chinese counterpart which had recently launched a scheme to bring back Chinese scientists settled abroad.

    India could also take up a similar kind of initiative, Ramakrishnan, here for inauguration of A L Mudaliar Centre for Basic Science Development at the Madras University, said.

    "I think people, who come back to India will have strong personal ties," he said adding that those who stayed back "feel they don't have the facilities".

    'Red tape, politics dither scientists from returning home'
     
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  3. Sridhar

    Sridhar House keeper Moderator

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    Nobel Laureate Ramakrishnan says bureaucracy, politics and red tape hampering India

    Published on : Wednesday 23 Dec 2009 11:11 - by ANI


    Chennai, Dec 23 : Nobel laureate Venkatraman Ramakrishnan has said that Indian scientists settled abroad wanted to come back to India, but were held back by the country's red tapism.

    A US citizen of Indian origin, Ramakrishnan, along with Thomas A. Steitz and Ada E. Yonath shared the 2009 Nobel Prize for chemistry for studies of the structure and function of the ribosome.

    Ramakrishnan said India could follow the example of China, which has launched a massive drive to bring back scientists who had migrated to the West.

    "China has now launched a major scheme to bring back Chinese scientists from the West to work in China. So I think it is certainly possible but for it to be attractive, you will have to give them a lot of autonomy from the bureaucracy, from the red tape, from local politics things like that so that they can come back and really...what they like to do is they like to do their science. So if you make it attractive enough, so they feel they can continue to do very good science while being in India then many of them might do it," Ramakrishnan told reporters here.

    Ramakrishnan cautioned that the government would have to take effective steps to cut bureaucratic delays to reverse the "brain drain."

    "I think people will come back. The people who will come back to India will be people who have very strong personal ties to India and want to come back but have not come back because they feel there is too much bureaucracy or they cannot do their work or things like that or they do not have the facilities. So the facilities and bureaucracy problem will only attract people who want to come back in the first place," he said.

    The consequences of the "brain drain" are grave as it leaves gaping holes, mainly in the healthcare systems of developing countries where diseases such as AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria run rampant and children die daily from diarrhoea.

    Copyright Asian News International (ANI)

    Nobel Laureate Ramakrishnan says bureaucracy, politics and red tape hampering India
     
  4. S.A.T.A

    S.A.T.A Senior Member Senior Member

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    Iam yet to understand how red tape or politics actually discourages the so called Indian born foreign scientist from finding employment in India,unless they actually want to join some govt funded institution or want to start up an enterprise.

    There are lot of cash private enterprises where red tapeism or politics is not the problem.there is plenty of venture capital available for the entrepreneur minded.

    All this talk about red tapesim,lack of opportunity are mere excuses that most of these guys indulge in while they are self denial.Nobody wants to come to a developing country after having worked and lived in a developed one,there are exception but its not the norm.

    P.S:a while back i read this fellow was complaining about being irritated with Indians flooding his email inbox with congratulatory messages....wow how snobbish can one get.
     
  5. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    Infact what he is saying is good for us .The Universities are nothing but a joke
    with the professors being bloated with a titanic ego .The CSIR infact is nicknamed the Council of supression and research add to that the funding for research in universities is meagre
     
  6. S.A.T.A

    S.A.T.A Senior Member Senior Member

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    Our universities cannot match the west precisely because of the economic factor,the funding capacity of the Indian universities will not increase in isolation from the general expansion of the Indian economy.All talk about politics is BS,its the money and life style(or its lack of here) that forbids them from coming home from west.its only that they don't want to admit it it openly.
     
  7. ppgj

    ppgj Senior Member Senior Member

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    agree with S.A.T.A's observations. guys who talk like this do not understand that even the west passed thro' the same tests india is going thro' now.
    why can't they take it up as a challenge and be the models and lead indian research. infosys, wipro, tatas have all existed here and have come up.
    why can't they lend a helping hand to the GOI and set up or be part of the existing institutions?
    they can extend and enjoy their grand stay in their countries of choice and not lecture what needs to be done. so much for their patriotism!!
    others who are doing similar work in india need to be encouraged.
     
  8. Sridhar

    Sridhar House keeper Moderator

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    He don't like the sudden publicity/attention after the Nobel prize.


    Science bigger than Nobel: Venki

    Science bigger than Nobel: Venki - Chennai - City - The Times of India


    'Honour people for their work, not their awards'


    http://www.expressbuzz.com/edition/...ID=lifojHIWDUU=&SEO=&SectionName=rSY|6QYp3kQ=


    Prize a distraction, says Nobel laureate Venkataraman


    Prize a distraction, says Nobel laureate Venkataraman
     
  9. ppgj

    ppgj Senior Member Senior Member

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    Inefficient bureacracy causing regression in Indian science: Manmohan

    Inefficient bureacracy causing regression in Indian science: Manmohan

    Special Correspondent Thiruvananthapuram, January 3, 2010

    [​IMG]
    Prime Minister Manmohan Singh with his wife Gursharan Kaur in Thiruvananthapuram as he arrives for a two-day state visit on Saturday. He inaugurated the 97th Indian Science Congress on Sunday. Photo: PTI

    Prime Minister Manmohan Singh urged the scientific community to come out with suggestions to "liberate Indian science from the shackles and deadweight of bureacratism and in-house favouritism"

    The 97th annual session of the Indian Science Congress began here on a mixed note, with the Prime Minister, Manmohan Singh, expressing dismay that red-tapism, political interference and lack of proper recognition of good work have resulted in "regression" in Indian science, even while announcing several measures to improve the level of funding for research scholars.

    Urging the scientific community to come out with suggestions to "liberate Indian science from the shackles and deadweight of bureacratism and in-house favouritism", he said the Centre was considering formulating schemes that would provide some funding for every research scholar, even while increasing the quantum of money provided for the existing doctoral and post-doctoral fellowships.

    He also announced that the much awaited National Science and Engineering Research Board would start functioning before March and assured that the Protection of Intellectual Property Bill, which focussed on sharing revenue from intellectual properties with researchers will be taken up for discussion in Parliament soon.

    Besides, to make science education outreach more inclusive and affordable, the Government, he said, was working on special packages like the ones launched for the north-east region and Jammu and Kashmir recently for other regions like Bihar to bridge "asymmetries".

    "We are determined to ensure that what we have announced [in recent times for promoting science and technology] gets implemented. We also know that we need to do more because scientific capability is what will determine our ability to overcome the challenges which lie ahead’’, he added.

    Presenting a detailed roadmap for Indian science and technology sector, he, among other things, called for change in mindsets. "Much of what we have to do to improve science requires money, but this is only one part of what is needed. It also requires a change in mindset, including, if I may say so, the mindset of senior faculty and university administration." Noting that the Centre has declared 2010-2020 as the `Decade of Innovations’, he said the country needed to develop an innovation eco-system, which challenged innovators to produce newer solutions to meet the needs of society and which nurtured and rapidly applied such innovations for social good. While the scientific establishment should be central to such a system, it was, he said, necessary that it had a strong outward orientation. It should work in partnership with the industry and the innovation eco-system should include providers of venture funds and regulators, who would set standards for performance of the products coming out of research and development. "We need to concentrate on strengthening the linkages between the academia, research and industry. Today, each operates within its own silo. Unless we close those gaps, our research and development sector may report high performance in terms of published papers, but our challenges of the 21st century will remain unsolved." He also urged elite institutions such as the IITs to do more to address the technological challenges of the 21st century. "Their research goals and the expectations of the industrial and social sectors must be better aligned." Referring to the recent climate change summit at Copenhagen, he said that though the global community made very limited progress at the summit and "no one was fully satisfied with the outcome", the fact remained that the nations of the world have to move to a low greenhouse gas emission and energy efficient development path. "All over the world, countries are chalking out strategies to achieve greater energy efficiency and a shift to renewable sources of energy. They are also chalking out strategies for adapting to such climate change as it is inevitable. India must not lag behind in these areas. Indeed, we should plan to be among the leaders in the development of science and technology related to mitigation and also adaptation to climate change’’.

    Dr. Singh also referred to recent developments in the area of biotechnology and urged the scientific community to pursue all possible leads that could improve the country’s food security subject to the "caveat" that questions of safety should be fully addressed, with appropriate regulatory control based on strictly scientific criteria.

    He also called for special efforts to encourage scientists of Indian origin working abroad to either return to India or visit Indian universities and scientific institutions for short periods of time and urged for measures to increase private investment in research and development. "Some innovative policy readjustments may be required to build a vibrant public-private partnerships in the S&T sector," he added.

    The Hindu : News / National : Inefficient bureacracy causing regression in Indian science: Manmohan
     
  10. Tamil

    Tamil Regular Member

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    good thinking and welcome sign on Indian counter part for youngsters, my thought is use as much IITins in R&D in india
     
  11. Sridhar

    Sridhar House keeper Moderator

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    Now PM acknowledges this

    Free science from red tape: PM - India - The Times of India
     
  12. Sridhar

    Sridhar House keeper Moderator

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    Liberate Indian science: PM
    First Published : 04 Jan 2010 02:39:00 AM IST
    Last Updated : 04 Jan 2010 08:27:42 AM IST

    THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: Liberate Indian Science from the shackles and dead weight of bureaucratism and in-house favouritism, said Prime Minister Manmohan Singh. The PM's tough words came during the inaugural address of the 97th Indian Science Congress at the Kerala University Campus in Karyavattom, near here.Singh took note of Nobel Laureate Dr Venkatraman Ramakrishnan's recent comment on the need for greater "autonomy from red tape and local politics" for Indian scientists. "It is unfortunately true that red tape, political interference and lack of proper recognition of good work have all contributed to a regression in Indian science in some sectors," he said.The Prime Minister urged scientific institutions to introspect and to propose mechanisms for greater autonomy, including autonomy from the government, which could help to improve standards. "We must make a special effort to encourage scientists of Indian origin currently working abroad to return to India. In this way we can convert the brain drain of the past into a 'brain gain' for the future," he said.The PM said that money was only one part of what was required to improve science; a change in the mindset of senior faculty and university administration was equally important. "Our elite institutions like the IITs must do more to address the technological challenges of the 21st century. Innovators must be challenged to produce solutions society needs," he said. Singh called for a redoubled effort to attract talented young women to take up careers in science. He said that a step in this direction was a new scheme available for women's universities named Consolidation of University Research, Innovation and Excellence (CURIE) which provided financial help for complete upgradation of facilities in such universities.The Prime Minister said that we had been able to make only very limited progress at the Copenhagen Summit and no one had been satisfied with the outcome.And yet there was no escaping the truth that nations of the world had to move to a low greenhouse gas emissions development path.Minister of State for Science and Technology Prithviraj Chavan delivered the keynote address. Kerala Governor R S Gavai, Chief Minister V S Achuthanandan, Union Minister for Overseas Indian Affairs Vayalar Ravi, Minister of State for External Affairs Shashi Tharoor, Education Minister M A Baby, Indian Science Congress general president Dr G Madhavan Nair, general secretary Dr Ashok K Saxena, Kerala University Vice-Chancellor Prof A Jayakrishnan and ISRO chairman Dr K Radhakrishnan were also present.The Prime Minister also gave away the Indian Science Congress Association awards. The five-day Congress will conclude on January 7.

    Liberate Indian science: PM
     
  13. Sridhar

    Sridhar House keeper Moderator

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    Convert brain drain into brain gain: Manmohan Singh

    Don Sebastian
    Monday, January 4, 2010 1:13 IST


    Thiruvanathapuram: Incentives for scientists returning from abroad, higher compensation for research fellows and science awards for school students are some of the strategies the government has in mind to ensure technological innovation, prime minister Manmohan Singh said on Sunday.

    Inaugurating the 97th Indian Science Congress in Thiruvananthapuram, he announced that the National Science and Engineering Research Board will start functioning in a couple of months.
    “A national policy for data sharing and accessibility has also been formulated. The Protection of Intellectual Property Bill, focusing on sharing revenue from intellectual properties with researchers, will be taken up for discussion in Parliament very soon,” he said.
    “Under the Innovation in Science Pursuit for Inspired Research (Inspire) scheme, we will soon be announcing the name of at least one science awardee per school in the age group of 10-15 in the entire country.”
    He hinted at revising the value of doctoral and post-doctoral fellowships and forming of schemes that would cover all research scholars with some funding.
    Saluting Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, Singh acknowledged the Nobel laureate’s comment on the need for greater “autonomy from red tape and local politics”. “I urge all our scientific institutions to introspect and to propose mechanisms for greater autonomy, including autonomy from the government.
    “We must make a special effort to encourage scientists of Indian origin currently working abroad to return to our country, including coming to our universities or scientific institutions for a short period. In this way we can convert the ‘brain drain’ of the past into a ‘brain gain’ for the future. This will require special incentives.

    Convert brain drain into brain gain: Manmohan Singh - dnaindia.com
     

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