Pakistan's social services are collapsing

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by Kshatriya87, Nov 17, 2014.

  1. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    New reports on Pakistan suggest the country still has a long way to go in tackling malnutrition, polio, lack of education, and terrorism. Guest columnist Ahmed Rashid says a tepid government response has only exacerbated such problems.

    The government of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif is facing a political and economic crisis and a spate of recent reports has highlighted the parlous state of the country's social services.

    The government appears oblivious to chronic deficiencies in health, education and governance. If it addresses these issues, it is only to put out statements of denial about cause and effect and to clamp down on critics in the media.

    A recent conference in Islamabad organised by the UN's World Food Program pointed out that 44% of Pakistan's population is facing malnutrition, 15% of whom suffer from acute malnutrition. As a result, some 11 million children under five will suffer from stunted growth.

    Other UN surveys that have been carried out and come to even more dire conclusions have so far not been published. According to some Western diplomats, this is because the government objects to them.

    There is little recognition of the problem by Islamabad. Much of the cause for severe malnutrition is not the shortage of food, but its high cost which people can no longer afford.

    Food riots have already occurred in Sindh and Balochistan provinces, and famine was declared last year in the Tharpaker desert area of Sindh, leading to an outpouring of support from civil society but few long-term plans for the region by the government. Such protests could spread to grain-rich Punjab province.

    The water crisis across Pakistan is become more acute by the day, with vast areas of Sindh and Balochistan expected to be declared waterless in the next decade, while there is no management of excess water and floods during the monsoon season. The lack of water in Punjab's canal system built by the British Raj is already driving down food production in Punjab.

    Polio crisis

    Meanwhile Pakistan's campaign to prevent the spread of polio that afflicts young children has been termed ''a disaster'' by the Global Independent Monitoring Board for the eradication of polio.

    In its latest report issued from Geneva on October 26, the Board says: "Pakistan's polio programme is a disaster. it continues to flounder hopelessly, as its virus flourishes.... Pakistan is now the major stumbling block to global polio eradication."

    It calls the government's Emergency Operations Centre "a masterpiece of obscurity".

    "It's frustrating, eradicating polio is not rocket science," Elias Durry of the World Health Organisation says.

    Pakistan has had 217 polio cases this year, accounting for 85% of all instances around the world and the highest incidence in 14 years. Moreover, 64 vaccinators have been killed by the Pakistani Taliban who oppose the campaign, also a sign of inadequate protection by security forces.

    Nurses and support staff who carry out this dangerous work have not been paid for two months. Pakistan now faces the disgrace of having exported the virus to China, Syria, Egypt and Israel according to WHO, through carriers who went to these destinations.

    WHO fears that if Pakistan refuses to act, more money will be spent on blockading Pakistan from other countries to prevent the spread of the virus than actually combating it.

    However for more than a year the government has refused to acknowledge the scale of the disaster and kept facts hidden from parliament and the media.

    The Foreign Office has issued disturbing and defensive statements accusing the international community of exaggerating the threat.

    Only after the Board's recent report has Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif reacted. While addressing the chief ministers of the four provinces on 4 November, he said he would give the Committee on Polio Eradication six months to make Pakistan polio-free.

    However even that statement was withdrawn a day later.


    Rise in violence

    Meanwhile 25 million children still do not go to school - the largest number of any country in the world. A new report by Alif Ailaan, a leading education campaign organisation states that only one in four children who do enrol in school make it to grade 10.

    Half the children drop out by the fifth grade while conditions in schools are deplorable as many lack running water, toilets or even classrooms. Despite large-scale spending on schools by the Punjab government, not much has improved over the past few years.

    There has been an alarming rise in the level of violence against all minorities in Pakistan, highlighted on 4 November by the mob killing of a Christian couple and the burning of their bodies on account of alleged blasphemous statements they made, when a more prosaic version of events emerged: they owed their employer money and he was exacting revenge.

    Many of the social campaigns such as anti-polio and population control are unsuccessful because they are threatened by terrorists. Yet how can any campaign be mounted against extremism when there appears to be no strategic policy of zero tolerance for terrorism or a central authority.

    The National Internal Security Policy, announced as a clearing house and central command for the anti-terrorist campaign, has not been heard from since it was announced in February.

    The lack of a clear political strategy by the government has led to an ever greater policy and implementation failure on social issues.

    Ahmed Rashid is a Pakistani journalist and author based in Lahore. His latest book is Pakistan on the Brink - The Future of America, Pakistan and Afghanistan.


    BBC News - Viewpoint: Pakistan's social services are collapsing
     
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  3. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    "Sindh and Balochistan expected to be declared waterless in the next decade"
     
  4. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    "It's frustrating, eradicating polio is not rocket science," Elias Durry of the World Health Organisation says.


    Pakistan now faces the disgrace of having exported the virus to China, Syria, Egypt and Israel according to WHO, through carriers who went to these destinations.
     
  5. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    25 million children still do not go to school - the largest number of any country in the world


    Half the children drop out by the fifth grade while conditions in schools are deplorable as many lack running water, toilets or even classrooms.
     
  6. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    All $$$$ goes to gazi army
     
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  7. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Sometimes I think even North Korea is better than Pak
     
  8. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Pakistan social services are collapsing their terrorist services are on the rise.
     
  9. thethinker

    thethinker Senior Member Senior Member

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    10 things that will happen when you move to Karachi - Blogs - DAWN.COM

    Karachi – messy, slightly dangerous and hot as hell – it’s a place that will infuriate you and seduce you.

    This is as cosmopolitan as Pakistan gets. – you’ll meet all sorts in Karachi.

    Karachi-ites have a high opinion of themselves.

    Fast-paced and just a bit insane, it’s a city that will get under your skin.

    1. You will become blasé about security.

    Yes, you will become a total dheet when it comes to Karachi’s halaat.

    Sure, armed guards are the norm and you instinctively avoid no-go areas but, in general, life goes on. When strikes, muggings and the like are so common it’s difficult to maintain a heightened level of worry.

    Concerned relatives from out of town will phone you after a scary news report but you’re likely to be at a restaurant or GT when they call. No changing plans unless bullets are actually flying - and if they are, you'll be so practiced that you can have the shutters down and the drawbridge up in under 10 minutes.
    Danger? What danger?

    2. You will become lazy and totally dependent on your maid

    When your maid doesn't come back from her day off.

    Home help is a luxury that you will rapidly get used to.

    You may have cleaned your whole house, done the laundry, shopped for groceries AND cooked when you were abroad but now you’ll resent having to go down to the kitchen yourself to get a cup of tea.

    3. You will get robbed

    Consider it a rite of passage and pray that you get off lightly.

    Hopefully the worst that will happen is that someone will steal your wallet or phone at gunpoint. Some traffic signals are notorious for this and I have an uncle who faced a gun at two consecutive traffic signals. Hopefully you won’t be kidnapped or have your home invaded by robbers but in a city like Karachi there are no guarantees.

    You will definitely know someone who’s gone through this horrible ordeal.

    4. Your wardrobe will gradually turn beige and white

    It may be our tropical climate or our love of subtle chic, but Karachi-ites wear a LOT of white, off-white, ecru and beige. Live here for any length of time and your wardrobe will start to reflect this.

    5. Your driving will deteriorate

    Karachi's pick and mix attitude to traffic laws will get to you sooner or later.

    Most drivers ignore traffic rules completely and operate on the principal of “might is right”. The horn is king and giving way is unheard of.

    You can try to stick to sensible driving practices but it’s likely that one day you will decide, “if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em”.

    6. You will realise that electricity and running water are luxuries

    When the water tanker doesn't turn up and you want to shower.

    Karachi is definitely better off than many rural areas of Pakistan but the sort of uninterrupted services you get abroad are a dream for Karachi-ites.

    You will come to rely heavily on your electricity generator and your water tanker wallah.

    7. You'll become surgically attached to your sunnies

    Essential for posing but even more essential for hiding from the blazing sun.

    The sun shines here almost 365 days a year. As glorious as that sounds to those who live in more gloomy climates, the constant bright sunshine can get to you. If you couldn’t retreat behind your sunnies, you’d go mad.

    8. You will lose weight

    Karachi subscribes wholeheartedly to the adage that “you can never be too rich or too thin”.

    The average socialite in Karachi is significantly lighter than her counterparts in other parts of Pakistan. You'll find yourself joining the gym or an exercise class or downloading diet plans.

    If you're coming from abroad, you’ll drop a few pounds from the repeated stomach infections that you'll get as your body develops immunity to our local bugs.

    9. You will realise that 'chai pani' is necessary to get anything done

    You thought you could get it done without paying a bribe?

    'Chai pani' has nothing to do with chai (tea) or pani (water) and everything to do with greasing palms. It’s not a coincidence that Pakistan ranks among the most corrupt countries in the world.

    10. Your friends will become your extended family

    You'll make great friends.

    Even though living in Karachi can be a challenge, it holds some of the most generous, warmhearted people in the world.

    You will make very dear friends who will be like family.
     
  10. jus

    jus Senior Member Senior Member

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    Some Key points
    44% of Pakistan's population is facing malnutrition, 15% of whom suffer from acute malnutrition.

    217 polio cases this year, accounting for 85% of all instances around the world

    Meanwhile 25 million children still do not go to school,Half the children drop out by the fifth grade while conditions in schools are deplorable

    vast areas of Sindh and Balochistan expected to be declared waterless in the next decade


    and add

    Regular Bomb blasts,Shia,Ahmadi,minority Genocide

    So in short SOMALIA IN MAKING :wave:
     
  11. Vishwarupa

    Vishwarupa Senior Member Senior Member

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    44% of Pakistan's population is facing malnutrition, 15% of whom suffer from acute malnutrition.

    217 polio cases this year, accounting for 85% of all instances around the world

    Meanwhile 25 million children still do not go to school,Half the children drop out by the fifth grade while conditions in schools are deplorable


    The above social indicators are enough to raise army of terrorists. Not much nutrition & education is required to wear a bomb belt & blow yourself in public to kill innocent people,

    i think pakistan is just doing fine, these indicator are more than enough to safeguard islam. I request international community(especially UN) to leave pakistan on its own & concentrate on other stuff, they have multiple daddies in the form of china, US & KSA to bail them out.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2014
  12. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Let alone social services, Pakistan itself has collapsed.



     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  13. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    1000 times better at least they is no polio and electricity shortfall and lawlessness like pak
     
  14. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Pakistan's social,cultural,economical,ethical,medical all services are collapsing
     
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  15. anupamsurey

    anupamsurey Regular Member

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    they just mentioned bullets, i say it is an understatement it actually should have been "greeted by bomb blasts".
     
  16. Kshatriya87

    Kshatriya87 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Pakistan sets new limits of collapse every year. I don't know how the do it. Need special talent for that.
     

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