Pakistan's Shia Genocide !!

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by Singh, Sep 17, 2011.

  1. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    The Plight of Pakistan's Shia



    Is Sunni-majority Pakistan in the midst of a low-grade war against its minority Shia population? Scarcely a month goes by without word of a new atrocity: a car bomb outside a Shia mosque in Quetta during Ramadan, a suicide bombing of a Shia procession in Lahore, Shia doctors mysteriously shot in Karachi.

    In July, after prosecutors failed to find evidence of his alleged involvement in the murders of scores of Shia, the Supreme Court released Malik Ishaq, leader of the banned Sunni sectarian group Lashkar-e-Jhangvi. He promptly received a hero's welcome from his followers. The Pakistani government has allowed Sunni-ruled Bahrain to openly recruit Pakistani mercenaries to put down a restive Shia majority demanding democratic rights in the oil-rich kingdom.

    The country's Shia are worried. In July, hundreds took to the streets of Quetta to protest the ongoing killings. Others have begun an online petition to draw attention to their plight. In private, some Shia wonder whether over time they will meet the same fate as the heterodox Ahmadiyya community, stripped of their recognition as Muslims and hustled toward the margins of national life.

    All this over what to many people is an obscure theological debate shrouded in history. Shia revere Ali, the prophet Muhammad's son-in-law and Islam's fourth caliph. They regard the denial of Ali's alleged right to succeed the prophet on his death, his subsequent murder, and the martyrdom of his son Hussein at Karbala (in present-day Iraq) later as seminal events.

    To be sure, compared to other religious minorities—Ahmadis, Christians and Hindus—the Shia are relatively fortunate. They have so far faced no battery of discriminatory laws, and their exposure to the country's toxic culture of permissible violence is both relatively recent and somewhat limited. But this position of comparative privilege is precisely why the Shia matter so much to Pakistan's future.

    The 36-million-strong community is a bulwark against the violent Sunni fundamentalism of groups such as the Taliban, Lashkar-e-Jhangvi and Punjab-based Sipah-e-Sahaba. Reverence for Islamic shrines and other practices considered impure by Sunni extremists make them among the fiercest opponents of the intolerant, triple-distilled Islam of the Taliban.

    Judging by Pakistan's history, that Shia in this country face any degree of violence or discrimination is ironic. The country's founding father, Mohammed Ali Jinnah, belonged to a Shia sect, the Khoja, whose followers are famous in the subcontinent for their business acumen. Many of Jinnah's top lieutenants in the Pakistan movement were also Shia.

    Unlike much of the Arab world, where Shia have traditionally constituted an underclass, the community in Pakistan began with a seat at the head table of power. In the early decades of independence, Pakistan had two Shia presidents and at least one Shia prime minister. The list of prominent generals, businessmen, ambassadors and newspaper editors from the community is too long to recount.

    Only in the 1980s, under the fundamentalist Sunni dictatorship of Gen. Zia ul-Haq, did the compact between Sunni and Shia begin to fray. Partly to protect their distinct identity, Shia protested the general's clumsy attempt in 1980 to impose a uniform alms tax on all Muslims.

    Around the same time, Pakistan was sucked into a shadowy proxy war for influence between two rival strains of radical Islam: the messianic Shia variety propagated by Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini, and Wahhabism, an austere back-to-basics form of Sunni Islam championed by Saudi Arabia.

    The explicitly anti-Shia Sipah-e-Sahaba (Soldiers of the Prophet's Companions), born in southern Punjab in 1985, took up the cause of Sunni peasants in a region dominated by large Shia landowners. Over the years, a clutch of Shia rivals, including the banned Sipah-e-Muhammad (Soldiers of Muhammad), have attempted to fight back.

    Over the past three decades, violence between Sunni and Shia has ebbed and flowed, but two things are clear. First, despite spawning banned violent sectarian outfits of their own, the Shia have largely been on the receiving end of violence. In a 2005 report, the International Crisis Group estimated that Shia accounted for 70% of sectarian deaths over the previous 20 years. In recent years, the violence has spread from southern Punjab and (sporadically) Karachi to Quetta in Balochistan, and the Federally Administered Tribal Areas on Pakistan's troubled border with Afghanistan.

    Second, the space to be publicly Shia in Pakistan has shrunk dramatically. This is most obvious in the tale of the Bhutto family. Though not overtly pious, Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto, who ruled from 1971 to 1977, is described by Vali Nasr of Tufts University as marking "the pinnacle of Shia power in Pakistan."

    But by the late 1980s, Bhutto's daughter Benazir, who herself became prime minister, had begun to call herself a Sunni. Her husband, current President Asif Ali Zardari, maintains a studied silence on the subject, an apparent attempt to attract Shia support without tempting fundamentalist Sunni ire.

    For Pakistan, founded as a homeland for all Indian Muslims, the Sunni-Shia divide is an awkward subject that many would rather ignore. But the rest of the world needs to pay more attention to this conflict in the shadows. If Pakistan can't even protect its numerous and well-connected Shia, then the odds of moderates prevailing over extremists in an ongoing battle for the country's future look exceedingly slim.


    Sadanand Dhume: The Plight of Pakistan's Shia - WSJ.com
     
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  3. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Hindus/Sikhs killed by muslims, Amedis are killed by Sunnis/Shias, Shias killed by Sunnis, Barelvi and Debandi Sunnis kill each other. The more Islamic muslim will kill less islamic muslim. That's the state of Pakistan, which touts itself as haven for indian-subcontinent muslims. But, alas all this dream is crumbling on itself. Jinnah must be rolling in his grave see in this sad state of pure land.
     
  4. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    Jinnah must be thinking Karma is a bitch as he was a shia.As all pakistani Shias must be thinking
     
  5. johnee

    johnee Elite Member Elite Member

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    Only the last man standing will prove to be most 'islamic', until then this phenomenon will go on.

    Yep. And Ahmediya were the funders, they are persecuted community now.
     
    sydsnyper likes this.
  6. agentperry

    agentperry Senior Member Senior Member

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    all can be traced back to 18th century fatwa by waliullah...
     
  7. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Can you please provide some details? Thanks.
     
  8. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

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    And the majority of the Sunnis actually opposed Pakistan first as was exemplified by the Deoband position.

    How strange is the kaal-chakra :lol:

    For Shia Hazaras, it’s Funeral After Funeral | Wahdat News
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2011
  9. SpArK

    SpArK SORCERER Senior Member

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    At least 26 Shi'ite pilgrims killed in Pakistan

    At least 26 Shi'ite pilgrims killed in Pakistan

    QUETTA, Pakistan | Tue Sep 20, 2011 10:01am EDT

    (Reuters) - Gunmen opened fire on a bus in Pakistan's southwestern province of Baluchistan in a suspected sectarian attack on Tuesday, killing at least 26 Shi'ite Muslim pilgrims traveling to Iran, police said.

    Four assailants attacked the bus carrying more than 50 pilgrims near Mastung town around 50 km (30 miles) from the provincial capital of Quetta.

    "They opened fire on the bus from all four sides. Then they got into the bus and fired again," a police official in Mastung said.

    Three more people were killed when gunmen opened fire on an ambulance near Quetta as it headed to the attack site in Mastung.

    Sunni Muslim militants loyal to al Qaeda and the Taliban have carried out high-profile attacks on members of Pakistan's Shi'ite minority in the past.

    "Two vehicles intercepted the bus. Forced all the passengers off and opened fire. Many of them fled," the driver of the bus, Khushal Khan, told reporters at the scene of the blast.

    "They were eight to 10 men and they were carrying rocket launchers and Kalashnikovs."

    Some shoes of the victims were scattered in the area. Rescue workers removed bodies from the spot.

    Sunni militants have stepped up attacks against Shi'ites in Baluchistan in recent months.

    Ethnic Baluch militants have been waging a low-level insurgency in Baluchistan for years for more autonomy and greater control over natural resources of the region.


    Officials say there is no evidence linking them with Islamist militants.

    At least 10 Shi'ites were killed in a suicide bombing near Quetta on the Muslim festival of Eid on August 31.

    Pakistan has seen a surge in violence since al Qaeda chief Osama bin Laden was killed by U.S. special forces in a secret raid in a Pakistani town in May.

    Militants have vowed revenge for bin Laden's death.


    At least 26 Shi'ite pilgrims killed in Pakistan | Reuters
     
  10. Galaxy

    Galaxy Elite Member Elite Member

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    I think this is 3rd such incident in last 1 month.

    Shiias, Ahmediyas, Hindus and other minorities. No one is safe in Pakistan except terrorists.
     
  11. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    Heck even OBL was'nt safe at all
     
  12. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

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    It is NOT the work of the Baloch freedom fighters. Baloch are the most secular of the tribes in Pakistan.

    Punjab based Sunni extremist org Lashkar-e-Jhangvi has claimed responsiliblty for the attack.

    Expect more retaliatory killings of Punjabis by the Baloch. Its time the Hazara too took the guns and went to the mountains along with the nationalist Baloch to fight this Punjabi bacjed religious nut jobs..
     
    Tronic likes this.
  13. Pakistani Nationalist

    Pakistani Nationalist Regular Member

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    ur beloved bla bastards killing hazaras.
     
  14. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

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    What a traitor you are to your own kinsmen....A pucca Judas..

    Gunmen attack bus in Balochistan, 26 killed – The Express Tribune

    The BLA has never targeted people for their sects. They only hate the pakjabis for their imperialism in Balochistan.Now go peddle your ISI BS some where.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2011
    Tronic likes this.
  15. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Militant Pakistan group admits carrying out bus attack

    The Pakistani sectarian group, Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, has said it was behind Tuesday's gun attacks in western Pakistan in which 29 people were killed.

    Gunmen stopped a bus and killed 26 Shia pilgrims travelling through Mastung in Balochistan province.

    They later attacked an ambulance that was carrying people injured in that attack, killing three more people.

    Lashkar-e-Jhangvi was banned in 2001 for fanning sectarian violence.

    A predominantly Punjabi group with links to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, it is also linked with the 2002 murder of US reporter Daniel Pearl and other militant attacks, particularly in the southern city of Karachi.

    The ethnic Hazara Shia community which was targeted in these attacks has announced a three-day mourning in the region.

    Reports from the provincial capital, Quetta, say the atmosphere is gloomy on Wednesday morning and most markets are shut.

    Meanwhile, in night-long raids, the police have rounded up more than 200 suspects, most of them Afghan nationals living in and around Quetta.

    Sunni and Shia extremists have frequently clashed and launched attacks on each other over the past 20 years.

    Tuesday's attack was the deadliest against Shias in Pakistan since a suicide bomber killed at least 57 people at a Shia rally in Quetta in September 2010.

    Shia Muslims are a minority in Pakistan. Nearly 600 of their community have been killed in sectarian attacks since 2002.

    At least 13 people were killed when a suicide bomber struck in the car park of a Shia mosque in Quetta Eid festival at the end of last month.

    BBC News - Militant Pakistan group admits carrying out bus attack
     
  16. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Can Yusuf tel me .What is the difference between Shia and Sunni Muslims in layman terms...
     
  17. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Both Sunni and Shia Muslims share the most fundamental Islamic beliefs and articles of faith. The differences between these two main sub-groups within Islam initially stemmed not from spiritual differences, but political ones. Over the centuries, however, these political differences have spawned a number of varying practices and positions which have come to carry a spiritual significance.

    The division between Shia and Sunni dates back to the death of the Prophet Muhammad, and the question of who was to take over the leadership of the Muslim nation. Sunni Muslims agree with the position taken by many of the Prophet's companions, that the new leader should be elected from among those capable of the job. This is what was done, and the Prophet Muhammad's close friend and advisor, Abu Bakr, became the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. The word "Sunni" in Arabic comes from a word meaning "one who follows the traditions of the Prophet."

    On the other hand, some Muslims share the belief that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet's own family, among those specifically appointed by him, or among Imams appointed by God Himself.

    The Shia Muslims believe that following the Prophet Muhammad's death, leadership should have passed directly to his cousin/son-in-law, Ali. Throughout history, Shia Muslims have not recognized the authority of elected Muslim leaders, choosing instead to follow a line of Imams which they believe have been appointed by the Prophet Muhammad or God Himself. The word "Shia" in Arabic means a group or supportive party of people. The commonly-known term is shortened from the historical "Shia-t-Ali," or "the Party of Ali." They are also known as followers of "Ahl-al-Bayt" or "People of the Household" (of the Prophet).

    from my disk
     
  18. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    RIP, if that help your ruffled feathers!

    Muslims killing Muslims.

    Sanctified by your religious scriptures.

    If not, why are they doing so?
     
  19. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Sir, as per Najam Sethi, pamphlets are openly distributed in Baluchistan to exhort people to kill Hazaras.
     
  20. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    But then Hazaras are also Muslims.

    Must not kill Muslims.

    I find Pakistanis as good as the Chinese. They talk with forked tongue.

    Act pious and then do a blood lust!

    Sethi has exposed their hypocrisy at every step!
     
  21. Galaxy

    Galaxy Elite Member Elite Member

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    Sir, That's why they call Najam Sethi as RAW agent. :lol:
     

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