Pakistan's Failure as a State

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by Daredevil, Sep 24, 2011.

  1. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Pakistan's Failure as a State


    Here is a tally of killings and establishment policies that tell a terrifying tale of state failure.

    Over 500 Shia Hazaras have been killed in Balochistan by Sunni extremists in the recent past. Last Tuesday, a bus was waylaid near Quetta by Lashkar-e-Jhangvi terrorists who mowed down 26 Shia passengers in cold blood. A month earlier, a story in this paper had warned that such a massacre was being planned in Quetta by self-avowed "Shia killers" of a "banned" organisation. But it was blithely ignored by the establishment. Two months ago, an extremist leader of a banned organization was set free from prison because the police, witnesses and judge weren't ready to do their duty. As he roams the land, thundering against Shias, the PMLN Punjab government in particular, and the PPP federal government in general, are inclined to make deals with him in order to further their electoral interests in at least 40 local constituencies.

    Over 30,000 citizens and 3000 soldiers have lost their lives at the murderous hands of the Tehreek-e-Taliban in the last three years. The Economic Survey 2011 claims this war has cost Pakistan upwards of $60 billion so far, which is nearly one third of our gross national income. FATA is squarely in the hands of Al-Qaeda and various Afghan and Pakistani Taliban and Jihadi outfits. Dir and Chitral in the Northern Areas are now threatened by terrorists seeking sanctuaries and base areas. Many of these groups were once state adjuncts; some are still assets. A few are in the process of reorganizing themselves, collecting funds and flexing their muscle again. The police are either too scared or helpless to do anything since establishment policy is murky. Now the TTP has announced a campaign of suicide attacks and kidnapping-for-ransom in the urban areas of Pakistan. Last week, the Karachi Defence Society house of DIG Police, Aslam Qureshi, was attacked in broad daylight by a truckload of explosives, killing all the guards and passersby. Last month, Shahbaz Taseer, the son of the murdered former Governor of Punjab, Salmaan Taseer, was kidnapped and whisked away to Waziristan. A pamphlet is circulating in Karachi which exhorts the Faithful to target a number of politicians and media-persons and, failing them, their family members. Each intelligence agency has circulated secret lists of targets to governments and mainstream political parties. Assassination is the name of the game.

    In Karachi, over 400 people were killed in the most recent wave of inter-party killings over August and September. The MQM is said to have at least 35,000 fully armed cadres who can be called out for action in the blinking of an eye - over 1 million arms licenses are reported to have been issued to them so far. The ANP's Pakhtun supporters don't need arms licenses because they have grown up brandishing Kalashnikovs and TT guns. The PPP's Zulfikar Mirza says he has personally issued 300,000 arms licenses to his Sindhi supporters for combating the MQM. Each of these parties is now allied to Karachi's traditional land, gun and drug mafias that are fattening by the day on the basis of their new political alliances.

    In Balochistan, separatist insurgents are attacking the police, Baloch and non-Baloch government functionaries and Punjabi settlers. In retaliation, the Frontier Corps and the intelligence agencies, which are arms of the Pakistan Army, are swooping down on suspects and making them "disappear". A number of armed non-state groups have mysteriously emerged in the province, all proclaiming robust Pakistani patriotism, to abduct and kill Baloch nationalists.

    The whole country has become one big killing field.

    Under the circumstances, with the police and civilian administrations wringing their hands in despair, there is only one institutional force that can establish the writ of the state and restore law and order. That is the Pakistan Army. But the Army is busy fending off the Americans, neutralizing the Indians, hiding and protecting the Afghan insurgents and fighting the Pakistani Taliban to have any energy or inclination to do any domestic cleansing. Are we therefore doomed?

    Not necessarily. The Army's troubles are mainly self-inflicted. If it can bring itself to de-link its raison d'etre (reason to be) from India, if it can conceive national security to have an economic and military dimension in equal measure rather than a military one exclusively, if it can consider national security to be an element of the national interest rather than synonymous with it, if it can stop extrapolating the national interest with core strategic outreach in Afghanistan, then perhaps some of our troubles will go away. In short, if the Pakistan Army can focus on concentrating its energies on securing domestic law and order and internal security instead of monopolising foreign policy within a failed security matrix, we can put our house in order by rooting out terrorism and reviving the economy, thereby giving increasingly desperate Pakistanis a sense of hope in the future.
     
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  3. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    A very stark state of Pakistan portrayed by Najam Sethi who writes about Pakistan in more rational and pragmatic manner.

    He summarizes what's the current state of Pakistan in this one line

    Indeed, everyone is killing one or the other. No one remains silent it seems, everyone one a killing spree, may be except for minorities and PoK residents.

    And what and who is responsible for this situation?. Yes, you guessed it right, its Pakistani Army. And how?? This is how according to Sethi and also the solution to this deep abyss that Pakistan finds itself in.

     
  4. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    We all know the problem and the inevitable outcome. The question is "should we stop caring and let it collapse?"
     
  5. mayfair

    mayfair Elite Member Elite Member

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    Of course not. We should see to it that it collapses, is dead and buried and then some.
     
    SPIEZ likes this.
  6. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    How will the world be safer with Pakistan in anarchy?
     
  7. civfanatic

    civfanatic Retired Moderator

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    Near-anarchy is what you have right now. The Paki government does not have sovereignty over its own territory.

    The collapse of Pakistan is inevitable and thus unimportant. What's important is what happens after the collapse; needless to say there will be many external forces at work trying to shape the post-Pakistan geopolitical environment in their favour.
     
  8. dance

    dance New Member

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    Pakistan suck
     
  9. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

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    ============================
     
  10. SpArK

    SpArK SORCERER Senior Member

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    HUh?//:shocked:

    okie. now do the suck dance ..
     
  11. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Another editorial from Najam Sethi. This time he paints even more stark reading of Pakistan.


    Wake up Pakistan!

    US-Pak relations have broken down. The United States has "suspended" military aid and all but closed the Kerry-Lugar-Berman tap of funds for the civilians. Proud Pakistanis have puffed up their chests and vowed to eat grass, if necessary, in order to defend the "sovereignty" of their country. What's the big deal, they aver, US aid was peanuts anyway, and our traditional friends like China and Saudi Arabia are at hand to bail us out of our problems.

    To be sure, our relationship with the US has been no small disaster.

    In the 1950s, we begged the US to befriend us instead of India, cheerily going along with the US into the cold war against the USSR when it wasn't our war at all. In consequence, the military became the dominant theme of our life and wrecked the budding impulse of democracy. Once again, in the 1980s and 2000s, we tripped over ourselves to rent out our services to the US in Afghanistan. Today we are reaping the terrorist whirlwind of our greed and opportunism.

    But a little introspection is in order to prove that we don't need the US as an enemy because we are our own worst enemies.

    More Pakistanis are eating "grass" now than ever before. The number of Pakistanis below the poverty line has increased from 27 per cent five years ago to 33 per cent in 2011. And this has nothing to do with the US.

    The growth rate of the economy has fallen from 6.5% five years ago to 3% now. The fiscal deficit is yawning at 7.5% of GDP today compared to 4.5% five years ago. And this has nothing to do with the US.

    The Rupee has fallen from 77 to the dollar five years ago to 90 today. General inflation is running at 15% and food inflation at 25%. And this has nothing to do with the US.

    The tax to GDP ratio is down to 8.7% in 2011 from 11.5% five years ago. And this has nothing to do with the US.

    Floods continue to devastate the lives and produce of millions of poor people across the country. And this has nothing to do with the US.

    Sunni extremists are rampaging, killing Shias. Ethnic parties continue to mow down people in Karachi. And this has nothing to do with the US.

    Power breakdowns have made the lives of tens of millions wretched and miserable while rendering millions of others jobless. And this has nothing to do with the US.

    Instead of rooting for Pakistani nationalism, we are proud to undermine it as Muslims first, or Sindhis, Muhajirs, Baloch, Pakhtun, Punjabi, Seraiki, Hazarajat, Kashmiri, Sunni, Shia, Deobandi, Barelvi. And this has nothing to do with the US.

    We are counted amongst the most corrupt countries of the world. We have waged four wars with India and lost each of them, in the bargain losing half of Pakistan. And this has nothing to do with the US.

    As if this litany of self-induced failures isn't enough, there is the hypocrisy of double standards to contend with too.

    Of course, the US has violated our sovereignty by raining drones on FATA. But so have the Afghan Taliban and Al-Qaeda who have established safe havens there too. But we are quick to blast the US and quicker still to pretend that Al-Qaeda doesn't exist and the Taliban are innocent refugees for whom our traditional hospitality is on offer.

    The story doesn't end here.

    The IMF is not welcome. How dare it demand that we tax the rich, plug the bleeding in public sector corporations, stop the theft of power, and spend according to our means.

    US aid is dispensable. We don't need to build dams and reservoirs for managing our natural resources, we don't need schools and teachers for our children and hospitals for the poor.

    Our all-weather friends are China and Saudi Arabia. Never mind that China doesn't help us much when we are ravaged by earthquakes and floods or when we are short of cash to pay our foreign bills. Never mind that Saudi Arabia treats our migrant workers like slaves, rents our military to crack down on Shia majorities in Bahrain and exports extremist "Islam" to our lands.

    At the end of the day, who eats grass when we rise to defend our sovereignty? Not our pot bellied traders and businessmen. Not our golf-playing generals. Not our Defence Housing Society residents. Not our foreign-asset holding politicians whose kids go to English-medium private schools at home and abroad. Not our self-righteous media Mughals who berate our slavish black-skins and white masks. Not our corrupt judges and civil servants. It's the wretched of the earth, the poorest of the poor, who eat grass.

    For too long we have made foreign scapegoats for our own failures and corruptions. It is time to wake up and set our house in order without begging or berating the US.
     
  12. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    Why not? I think that's the best bet. Pause the war on terror, keep needling with drones and wait and watch the game.

    The result?

    - minimal NATO casualties.
    - no political "fallout".
    - no need to get ones' brain screwed with the lingering question "what to do with Pakistan?"
    - reduces costs of war
    - reduces additional headache.

    And at the same time watch them kill each other off.
     
  13. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    If Najam Sethi continues to post so much truth, he's going to drive entire Pakistan into a state of depression. :lol:
     

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