Pakistan succesfully test fires Hatf v-Ghauri Missile

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by gokussj9, Nov 28, 2012.

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  1. gokussj9

    gokussj9 Senior Member Senior Member

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  3. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    y they waste missile in test.

    don't north Korean give DATA along with missile????

    or DATA is in north Korean language??

    or paki don't trust north Korean and want to test to make sure it works:rofl::rofl:
     
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  4. hit&run

    hit&run Elite Member Elite Member

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    May be they have tested it for north Korea. North Koreans are happiest people when India tests her missiles. Lage hath Pakistan unki bhe test kar deta hai.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2012
  5. Agnostic Muslim

    Agnostic Muslim Regular Member

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    Recent North Korean missile tests and their nuclear tests were pretty much failures, so even if North Korea provided the initial technology for the Ghauri, Pakistan has improved on it and further developed it into a mature platform.

    That said, I am surprised that the liquid fueled Ghauri is still being tested given that Pakistan has the more advanced solid fueled Shaheen series.
     
  6. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    its range is 1300 km, does Pak has that kind of testing area ?
     
  7. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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  8. Victor Sierra

    Victor Sierra Regular Member

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    Yeh missile hai??

    Ek dum meri pencil ki tarah dikh rhi hai...

    Why Pakistan is testing missile? Firr se darr gye kya?

    Arey darro mat, our govt. won't allow us to attack you.
     
  9. arkem8

    arkem8 Regular Member

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    It's a SCUD on steroids......nothing more....From the looks of the rocket plume it looks liquid fueled....
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2012
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  10. arkem8

    arkem8 Regular Member

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2012
  11. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    looks like it is same missile, they just changed the cone (RV) so that customer can call it their own missile.
     
  12. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Scuds have the worst CEP of any missiles ever made,no one other than Russsians
    have been successful in placing a nuclear warhead on one (even North Korea has failed).
    Scuds b/c/d cannot not carry more than a 50kt warhead at maximum but the speed will be greatly
    reduced. At best scuds are a tactical nuke but more or less outdated in the modern world
    of the 600 scuds saddam hussein fired on Israel in 1991 gulf war only 20 penetrated Israeli
    airspace. In 20 years I am sure interception technology has improved to a higher level radar
    sure has.
     
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  13. rock127

    rock127 Maulana Rockullah Senior Member

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    They are always scared of India and also wants to divert attention of its JAHIL awaam from internal issues and keep the Indophobia/Indian Boogyman alive. :laugh:
     
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  14. Victor Sierra

    Victor Sierra Regular Member

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    I hope they don't start testing each & every missile.

    As in a very old joke: Mum sends her child to bring Matchbox. On the way back to home, the boy started lighting each & every match-stick, to make sure that all of them works.
     
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  15. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    why does a 60 year old missile need so much testing??
     
  16. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    last time they tested our radar track it and GOI even give details of RV size, this time too we must have tracked it since they have to give advance 24 hours time before test. Since they dont have very long land mass they have to test it in Arabian sea, somewhere we have LRTR to monitor their test.

    BTW just few days ago we tested BMD missile against target missile with 1500 km range. If we were told in advance we could have tested our missile on their missile at least we dont have to waste our Prithvi as target.
     
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  17. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    R-11 / SS-1B SCUD-A

    R-11 / SS-1B SCUD-A
    R-300 9K72 Elbrus / SS-1C SCUD-B
    The Scud is a mobile, Russian-made, short-range, tactical ballistic surface-to-surface (hence the nomenclature abbreviation SS) missile system. The SCUD-series guided missiles are single-stage, short-range ballistic missiles using storable liquid propellants. The Scud is derived from the World War II-era German V-2 rocket. Unlike the FROG series of unguided missiles, the SCUDs have movable fins. Warheads can be HE, chemical, or nuclear, and the missile, launched vertically from a small platform, has a range of 300 km. Unsophisticated gyroscopes guided the missile only during powered flight - which lasts about 80 seconds. Once the rocket motor shut down, the entire missile with the warhead attached coasted unguided to the target area. Consequently, Scuds had notoriously poor accuracy, and the farther they flew, the more inaccurate they became. SCUD missiles are found in SSM (SCUD) brigades at front/army level. The SCUD series of missiles gave the Soviet front and army commanders an integral nuclear weapons capability. Non-nuclear variants of the SCUD missiles have been exported to both Warsaw Pact and non-Warsaw Pact nations.

    The SCUD-A is also known as SS-1b. The SCUD-B replaced the JS-3-mounted SCUD-A, which had been in service since the mid-1950s.
    The longer range SCUD B, also known as SS-1c, can be distinguished by the one meter greater length of the missile and the presence of two air bottles on the side of the superstructure in place of the single bottle used for the "SCUD A" missile. The SCUD B used unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH), a more powerful (and toxic) fuel than the kerosene fueled SCUD A, which required an engine redesign. They were transported originally on a heavy-tracked vehicle based on the JS heavy-tank chassis. This vehicle serves also as an erector and launcher for the missiles. The SCUD-B was introduced on the JS-3 tracked chassis in 1961 and appeared on the MAZ-543 wheeled chassis in 1965. The "SCUD B" missile has appeared on a new transporter-erector-launcher based on the MAZ-543 (8x8) truck. The introduction of this new powerful cross-country wheeled vehicle gave this missile system greater road mobility, reduces the number of support vehicles required, and still preserves a great choice in selecting off-road firing positions. The same basic chassis also has been used for the transporter-erector-launcher for the "SCALEBOARD" surface-to-surface guided missile. In the early 1980s, the SCUD-B was replaced by the SS-23, which has greatly improved range (500 km), increased accuracy, and reduced reaction and refire times.
    The SCUD-C SS-1d achieved an initial operational capability with Soviet forces around 1965. It had a longer range, though lower accuracy, than the SCUD B, and was deployed in smaller numbers. As of the late 1990s some remained in service in Russian ground forces.
    The SCUD-D SS-1e featured an improved guidance system, possibly incorporating active radar terminal homing, and a wider choice of warheads than its predecessors. This missile has a range of about 700 km. Initially operational in the 1980s, it may not have been deployed by former Soviet ground forces.
    At launch, a basic Scud contains about 3,500 kilograms (7,700 pounds) of IRFNA and about 1,000 kilograms (2,200 pounds) of fuel. Most of the IRFNA and fuel is used within the first 80 seconds of flight when the missile is gaining enough speed to reach its target. When this speed is reached, the Scud is designed to shut off its engine by shutting off the propellant tanks (a fuel tank and an oxidizer tank). The unused propellants-roughly 150 kilograms (330 pounds) of RFNA and 50 kilograms (110 pounds) of fuel-remain on board for the remainder of the flight.

    In the early 1970s, the Soviet Army sought a replacement for the 9K72 Elbrus (SS-1C `Scud B') system, which had a very slow reaction time [around 90 minutes to prepare and fire] and its poor accuracy when using conventional warheads. The replacement system, codename 9K714 Oka [SS-23 Spider], was developed by KB Mashinostroyenia (Machine Industry Design Bureau) in Kolomna. This system was phased out in compliance with the INF Treaty in the late 1980s. Russia's TBM inventory is limited to thousands of SS-1c/Scud B and SS-21/Scarab SRBMs as a result of the Intermediate Nuclear Force (INF) Treaty, which required the elimination of the FSU's extensive stocks of MRBMs.

    A second SCUD follow-on effort began in the form of the SS-26, which apparently entered service by 1999. The SS-26 SRBM is expected to be both a replacement for the SS-1c/Scud B and an export. By the early 1990s, the `Scud' system was unquestionably obsolete and many of the 9P117 launcher vehicles were retired due to age.

    Many nations have retired their scud arsenals only about 3 nations use scuds Pakistan,North Korea and Iran. All scuds in the past have been liquid fuelled.
     
  18. Blackwater

    Blackwater Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    sorry it was china, you cant develop locomotive for the last 65 yrs. and talk of develop missile
     
  19. rock127

    rock127 Maulana Rockullah Senior Member

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    You seems to missed the "PS" written after the story. "The Mum was China and the Kid was Pakistan" :lol:
     
  20. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    How big of a warhead do you think can be under that cone?? My guess 20kt at best
    if miniutarization is done which pakistan is not known to have achieved.
     
  21. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    here the old video of the same missile launch



    check at frame 0.26 they are the person who are supposed to improve it. Look at their faces and body language they are in defensive after the test :shocked:

    I dont have to show face of DRDO guys when they test missile and it is successful.

    this shows that it is imported maal............:rofl:

    Just writing name of Organisation which are supposed to make it does not make it home made.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
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