Pakistan: enough proof to prosecute Zakiur Rehman Lakhvi for 26/11 Mumbai attacks

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by JAISWAL, May 29, 2012.

  1. JAISWAL

    JAISWAL Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,512
    Likes Received:
    1,016
    Location:
    ghaziabad
    Pak says enough proof to nail Zakiur Rehman Lakhvi for 26/11 plot
    .
    .
    NEW DELHI: Pakistan has finally acknowledged that there is enough evidence to prosecute Lashkar commander Zakiur Rehman Lakhvi for his involvement in the Mumbai terror attacks, in what marks the first endorsement of India's case against the 26/11 masterminds holed up across the border.
    Pakistani officials admitted during last week's home secretary-leve talks that investigation conducted by their Federal Investigation
    Agency (FIA) had established Lakhvi's direct involvement in the 26/11 terror attacks.
    According to sources in the home ministry here, the Pakistani officials told home secretary R K Singh that the evidence against Lakhvi -- largely related to his role in organizing money and logistics, including the boat and inflatable dingy for the gang that ravaged Mumbai -- was strong enough to secure his conviction in court.
    "Pakistan told India about the development at FIA's end during the home secretary-level talks between the two countries in Islamabad last week," said an official privy to the details of talks between the two home secretaries.
    Officials here termed it as a "significant admission", stressing that Pakistani authorities will be required to produce the evidence in the court trying Lakhvi and six others including Lashkar commanders Zarar Shah and Abu Al Qama, who all are in jail.
    The development marks a validation of the evidence that India gathered against Lakhvi, Shah, Qama and others and can give satisfaction to the investigators who saw Pakistan cussedly shrugging off their findings as flimsy. It should also leave them intrigued because they maintain that the evidence about Lakhvi's role contained in the several Indian dossiers submitted to Pakistan had been so foolproof that it could have easily been corroborated even by the neighbourhood cop long ago.
    As it coincides with the pressure from the US for action against Hafiz Saeed, wary Indian officials wonder whether the new stance on Lakhvi's culpability is meant to isolate the Lashkar chief from his junior jihadis and to strengthen Pakistan's case that lack of evidence was the only reason why it was not acting against the Muridke-based hate monger.
    Significantly, Pakistani officials bluntly told their Indian counterparts that the demand for action against Saeed was based on what Pakistan's interior minister Rehman Malik called "hearsay".
    They did not relent when the Indian side pointed out that in his confessional statement, Ajmal Kasab had spoken about Saeed's role in motivating the 26/11 attackers. Though Pakistan, on India's insistence, agreed to put before the Pakistani court new details on Saeed's involvement, it maintained that the FIA could not find anything against him.
    The admission about evidence of Lakhvi's involvement in the Mumbai attacks raises the question of how Islamabad is going to treat the evidence against other 26/11 masterminds, particularly two serving officers of Pakistan army who were involved in the Mumbai plot. David Headley, the Pakistan-born jihadi who reconnoitered Mumbai as part of the 26/11 plot, had spoken about the involvement of the two officers, besides Saeed.
    Islamabad also gave an assurance to consider positively the request for release of Sarabjit Singh, a condemned Indian prisoner currently lodged in Kot Lakhpat Jail in Lahore. The assurance was given when home secretary R K Singh called on Pakistani interior minister Rehman Malik in Islamabad last week.
    "I have requested the Pakistan interior minister and my counterpart (interior secretary K M Siddiq Akbar) to release Sarabjit Singh. They have assured me that they will consider our request positively," Singh said while briefing reporters about his visit to Islamabad.
    Sarabjit was convicted for his involvement in the 1990 serial bomb blasts in Lahore and Multan that killed 14 people. He was given death sentence but his execution was indefinitely put off by the Pakistan government.
    Akbar too had hinted about the possibility after the talks when he told media in Islamabad that the Indian team raised the issue of Sarabjit and the matter would be decided in line with Pakistani laws. It is learnt that Pakistan may take the "pardon" route to release Sarabjit, if at all it decides to do it.
    The talks also saw both sides agreeing to initiate negotiations for a Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty which is meant to facilitate cooperation in investigation of crimes, prosecution and collecting evidence.
    Home secretary Singh said both sides have agreed "in principle" to initiate negotiations on a MLAT to strengthen cooperation in criminal matters. "The Pakistani side promised to examine the draft and revert with comments within two months," he said.
    He said the Pakistani side also "took note of Indian request" to consider the possibility of inking an extradition treaty between the two countries. "They said they would examine it," Singh said.
    Acceptance of the MLAT draft by Pakistan assumes significance as, if signed, it will pave the way for cooperation on all criminal matters including terror investigation. Assistance under the treaty includes locating and identifying persons and objects; search and seizure; making detained person available to give evidence or assist investigations; taking measures to freeze and confiscate any any funds meant for financing acts
    of terrorism and obtaining statements of accused
    or detained persons.
     
  2.  
  3. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2010
    Messages:
    2,455
    Likes Received:
    898
    Location:
    visakhapatnam
    may be they are trying to impress India and looking for Indianmilitary withdrawl from siachen..

    i think we don't have any prisoner exchange programme signed.in what way can it help us?
     
  4. Adux

    Adux Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    4,020
    Likes Received:
    1,695
    Siachin poly gentlemen, Dont fall for it. Lakhvi isnt worth Siachin.
     
  5. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    4,518
    Likes Received:
    1,378
    Location:
    Hyderabad and Sydney
    Pak says enough proof to nail Zakiur Rehman Lakhvi for 26/11 plot

    Is this decks being cleared to pave the way for MMS to visit Pakistan later this year?


    Pak says enough proof to nail Zakiur Rehman Lakhvi for 26/11 plot - The Times of India

    NEW DELHI: Pakistan has finally acknowledged that there is enough evidence to prosecute Lashkar commander Zakiur Rehman Lakhvi for his involvement in the Mumbai terror attacks, in what marks the first endorsement of India's case against the 26/11 masterminds holed up across the border.

    Pakistani officials admitted during last week's home secretary-level talks that investigation conducted by their Federal Investigation Agency (FIA) had established Lakhvi's direct involvement in the 26/11 terror attacks. According to sources in the home ministry here, the Pakistani officials told home secretary R K Singh that the evidence against Lakhvi -- largely related to his role in organizing money and logistics, including the boat and inflatable dingy for the gang that ravaged Mumbai -- was strong enough to secure his conviction in court.

    "Pakistan told India about the development at FIA's end during the home secretary-level talks between the two countries in Islamabad last week," said an official privy to the details of talks between the two home secretaries.

    Officials here termed it as a "significant admission", stressing that Pakistani authorities will be required to produce the evidence in the court trying Lakhvi and six others including Lashkar commanders Zarar Shah and Abu Al Qama, who all are in jail.

    The development marks a validation of the evidence that India gathered against Lakhvi, Shah, Qama and others and can give satisfaction to the investigators who saw Pakistan cussedly shrugging off their findings as flimsy. It should also leave them intrigued because they maintain that the evidence about Lakhvi's role contained in the several Indian dossiers submitted to Pakistan had been so foolproof that it could have easily been corroborated even by the neighbourhood cop long ago.

    As it coincides with the pressure from the US for action against Hafiz Saeed, wary Indian officials wonder whether the new stance on Lakhvi's culpability is meant to isolate the Lashkar chief from his junior jihadis and to strengthen Pakistan's case that lack of evidence was the only reason why it was not acting against the Muridke-based hate monger.

    Significantly, Pakistani officials bluntly told their Indian counterparts that the demand for action against Saeed was based on what Pakistan's interior minister Rehman Malik called "hearsay". They did not relent when the Indian side pointed out that in his confessional statement, Ajmal Kasab had spoken about Saeed's role in motivating the 26/11 attackers. Though Pakistan, on India's insistence, agreed to put before the Pakistani court new details on Saeed's involvement, it maintained that the FIA could not find anything against him.

    The admission about evidence of Lakhvi's involvement in the Mumbai attacks raises the question of how Islamabad is going to treat the evidence against other 26/11 masterminds, particularly two serving officers of Pakistan army who were involved in the Mumbai plot. David Headley, the Pakistan-born jihadi who reconnoitered Mumbai as part of the 26/11 plot, had spoken about the involvement of the two officers, besides Saeed.

    Islamabad also gave an assurance to consider positively the request for release of Sarabjit Singh, a condemned Indian prisoner currently lodged in Kot Lakhpat Jail in Lahore. The assurance was given when home secretary R K Singh called on Pakistani interior minister Rehman Malik in Islamabad last week.

    "I have requested the Pakistan interior minister and my counterpart (interior secretary K M Siddiq Akbar) to release Sarabjit Singh. They have assured me that they will consider our request positively," Singh said while briefing reporters about his visit to Islamabad.

    Sarabjit was convicted for his involvement in the 1990 serial bomb blasts in Lahore and Multan that killed 14 people. He was given death sentence but his execution was indefinitely put off by the Pakistan government.

    Akbar too had hinted about the possibility after the talks when he told media in Islamabad that the Indian team raised the issue of Sarabjit and the matter would be decided in line with Pakistani laws. It is learnt that Pakistan may take the "pardon" route to release Sarabjit, if at all it decides to do it.

    The talks also saw both sides agreeing to initiate negotiations for a Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty which is meant to facilitate cooperation in investigation of crimes, prosecution and collecting evidence.

    Home secretary Singh said both sides have agreed "in principle" to initiate negotiations on a MLAT to strengthen cooperation in criminal matters. "The Pakistani side promised to examine the draft and revert with comments within two months," he said.

    He said the Pakistani side also "took note of Indian request" to consider the possibility of inking an extradition treaty between the two countries. "They said they would examine it," Singh said.

    Acceptance of the MLAT draft by Pakistan assumes significance as, if signed, it will pave the way for cooperation on all criminal matters including terror investigation. Assistance under the treaty includes locating and identifying persons and objects; search and seizure; making detained person available to give evidence or assist investigations; taking measures to freeze and confiscate any funds meant for financing acts of terrorism and obtaining statements of accused or detained persons.
     
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,543
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Get the man!
     
  7. Bangalorean

    Bangalorean Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    6,207
    Likes Received:
    6,495
    He is a criminal, and the Pakis are duty-bound to punish him anyway. Or hand him to India.

    They are not going to do us a favour by arresting or punishing this man.
     
  8. lcatejas

    lcatejas Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2010
    Messages:
    710
    Likes Received:
    255
    Location:
    Bharat
    Still waiting for Khar's mujra a what ... do it fast if you have balls ... i know its all pak noutanki ..
     
  9. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,270
    Location:
    011
    They are playing a game. PPP govt is going to lose the upcoming elections. They are trying to play the next government by putting them on the spot. If PPP wanted, they could've and would've shut down LeT during their tenure.

    Pakistan establishment is willing to take on US to protect Haqqani network, why would they give up LeT under India's pressure. This is just dirty domestic politics.

    US, India should adopt the same philosophy as Pakistan, use disgruntled/religious/pliable elements to wage a civil war in Pakistan.
     
    Iamanidiot likes this.
  10. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Messages:
    10,788
    Likes Received:
    4,552
    This is there usual tricks...fry the small fish to appear as if they are doing something.
     
  11. Godless-Kafir

    Godless-Kafir DFI Buddha Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2010
    Messages:
    5,829
    Likes Received:
    1,799
    Just do enough to show that your doing something! :lol:
     

Share This Page