Pakistan bans Jamaat-ud-Dawa

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by Nicky G, Jan 15, 2015.

  1. Nicky G

    Nicky G Senior Member Senior Member

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    Pakistan bans Jamaat-ud-Dawa

    So US commands and the slave-state jumps again, though is it really going to make any difference?
     
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  3. bennedose

    bennedose Senior Member Senior Member

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  4. arnabmit

    arnabmit Homo Communis Indus Senior Member

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    No they didn't. Even today they gave typical statement: JuD is a charitable org, no proof against Hafiz Sayeed.

     
  5. Nicky G

    Nicky G Senior Member Senior Member

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  6. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Ban on militant groups
    Has Pakistan banned Jamaatud Dawa?


    IN the long, convoluted history of the Pakistani state banning militant groups, the present episode may be the most mysterious: a US government spokesperson has publicly and explicitly welcomed a decision by Pakistan to ban several more militant groups, even though absolutely no one in government here has made any such announcement.

    If US State Department Deputy Spokesperson Marie Harf’s assertion in a news briefing on Friday proves true — “We welcome [the decision] to outlaw the Haqqani network, Jamaatud Dawa, and I think about 10 other organisations linked to violent extremism,” Ms Harf is quoted as saying — it would demonstrate that the bad old days of Pakistani leaders treating external powers as more relevant and important in matters of national security than, say, the Pakistani public or parliament have never really gone away.

    Even more problematically, the latest move — if, indeed, it is announced soon, as Ms Harf has claimed it will be — would bolster the perception that Pakistan is fighting militancy at the behest of others, especially the US, and not because this is a war that this country must fight and win for its own survival.

    There is no doubt that the Pakistani state needs to do more against a much wider spectrum of militant and extremist groups operating its soil.

    Focusing on simply the so-called anti-Pakistan militant networks such as the TTP will only produce medium-term results, perhaps, but guarantees long-term failure in the fight against militancy. This is both because of the overlapping nature of militant groups — operational, strategic and ideological — and because a long-term future where the state is in competition with militias for predominance inside Pakistan is not a future that ought to be acceptable to anyone in this country.

    So yes, the Haqqani network needs to be banned as does the Jamaatud Dawa and sundry more names that may come to light soon. But without a zero-tolerance policy against militancy, there will be no winning strategy.

    Zero tolerance certainly does not mean simply military operations and heavy-handed counterterrorism measures in the urban areas; what it does suggest is a commitment to progressively disarm and dismantle militant groups and the wider extremist network that enables those groups to survive and thrive.

    Of course, simply banning more groups will not mean much unless the previous bans are implemented, the new bans cover all incarnations of a militant group, and there are sustained efforts by the law-enforcement and intelligence apparatus to ensure banned organisations do not quietly regroup once the initial focus fades. That has never happened before.

    And the present is even more complicated. What will a ban on the Haqqani network mean in practice given that the major sanctuary in North Waziristan has already been disrupted by Operation Zarb-e-Azb? What will banning the JuD mean for the Falahi Insaniyat Foundation? Will the government offer answers — to anything?

    Published in Dawn, January 19th, 2015

    Ban on militant groups - Pakistan - DAWN.COM
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  7. tramp

    tramp Senior Member Senior Member

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    The usual tactic of obfuscation and red herrings... ban has no meaning when any organisation can change the name and continue to work. A ban in Pakistan does not mean a crackdown on the people and the organisation, seizing of its assets and jailing its operatives. So makes no difference. This will be just lip service just to show the US so that they can get the next installment of the aid money. As soon as the money is released, the JUD will be back.
     
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    On paper that is.

    It will resurrect as something else.

    Banning alone is not good enough.

    The leaders must be shoved in jail, if they are serious about banning.

    It is all being done on paper to assure themselves for the cash flow that is expected to come from the US, which is their lifeline to existence.
     
  9. cobra commando

    cobra commando Tharki regiment Veteran Member Senior Member

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    Islamabad: The Jamat ud- Dawa headed by 26/11 mastermind Hafiz Saeed, whose assets have reportedly been frozen by Pakistan, held a rally in Pakistan's Karachi this afternoon. Pakistan's action came following US pressure ahead of US President Barack Obama's visit to India. "Pakistan, as a member of the United Nations is under obligations to proscribe the entities and individuals that are listed. We take our obligations very seriously," Tasnim Aslam, spokesperson of Pakistan's Ministry of Foreign Affairs said in a statement today. "Once any individuals and organizations are proscribed by the UN, we are required to freeze their assets and enforce travel restrictions. We take that action." Last week, Union Home Minister Rajnath Singh said Pakistan was not "mending its ways". Saeed, who has a $10 million bounty on his head, gets a free run in Pakistan, holding public rallies and giving interviews in which he rails against India. In December, he blamed India for the Taliban terror attack on a school in Peshawar and vowed revenge. The address to his followers had been aired by Pakistan's national television.In 2008, the United Nations said the JuD is a front for the terror group Lashkar- e-Taiba, which planned and executed the attack in Mumbai, which left 166 people dead. The US State Department declared the JUD a "foreign terrorist organisation" last year. The Lashkar founder claims he has long abandoned its leadership and now heads JuD, which is involved in humanitarian and charity work.
    Pakistan Says Action Taken. JuD Chief Hafiz Saeed Still Holds Rally
     
  10. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Is this Info updated on the "Pakistan Lies and Denials thread".

    I
     

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