Obama withdraws from ABM base in Poland and Czech???

Discussion in 'International Politics' started by bhramos, Aug 29, 2009.

  1. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    According to today's edition of Gazeta Wyborcza there's unofficial info that current US administration is convinced about alternative ABM system and abandoning of ABM facilities in Czech Republic and Poland is almost sure.

    source: Polska bez tarczy

    sorry this source is in Polski language.
     
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  3. IBRIS

    IBRIS Senior Member Senior Member

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    It's all about symbolic, permanent residence of US troops on Polish and Czech soil. It was the reason what upset them in Kremlin. By putting an ABM system in Europe the US was escalating.
    Well basically Poland is pissed because they are starting to realize that the big boys don't see them as an equal partner or "friend" and that they are just a pawn in the big boys chess matches. First will come anger, than denial and finally acceptance. Just like any other small countries that have had to face this reality, sometimes a lot more painfully. Welcome to the club
     
  4. kuku

    kuku Respected Member

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    Do they even have the money to keep up with all the different installations around the world?
     
  5. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    The Associated Press: Clinton counters critics of Obama missile defense

    Clinton counters critics of Obama missile defense

    (AP) – 11 hours ago

    WASHINGTON — Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton on Friday vigorously defended the administration's new approach to missile defense in Europe, which critics assert will leave Europe more vulnerable.

    "We believe this is a decision that will leave America stronger and more capable of defending our troops, our interests and our allies," Clinton said in a speech at the Brookings Institution.

    "We will deploy missile defense sooner than the previous program," she said. "We will be able to swiftly counter the threat posed by Iran's short- and medium-range ballistic missiles."

    Clinton disputed critics who say that President Barack Obama's new approach will leave Europe less protection from a missile attack.

    "It does what missile defense is actually supposed to do," she said. "It defends America and our allies."

    She added that criticism of the Obama plan is "not yet connected to the facts. We are not, quote, `shelving' missile defense. We are deploying missile defense sooner than the Bush administration planned to do so."

    Clinton also said Poland and the Czech Republic, which had been central to the previous missile defense plan, are now at the top of the Obama administration's list of candidates to host land-based versions of the new missile interceptor.

    "We would never, never walk away from our allies," she said, adding, "We will continue to cooperate closely with both" Poland and the Czech Republic.

    She said a U.S. Patriot antimissile unit will do rotational duty in Poland, and the U.S. will do "close missile defense research and development" with Czech companies.
     
  6. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    The Associated Press: Obama: Missile defense decision not about Russia

    Obama: Missile defense decision not about Russia

    By BEN FELLER (AP) – 31 minutes ago

    WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama sharply dismisses criticism that Russian opposition influenced his decision to scrap a European missile defense system, calling it merely a bonus if the leaders of Russia end up "a little less paranoid" about the U.S.

    "My task here was not to negotiate with the Russians," Obama told CBS' "Face the Nation" in an interview for broadcast Sunday. "The Russians don't make determinations about what our defense posture is."

    The president's comments were his first on the matter since he abruptly announced on Thursday that he was scuttling plans to deploy 10 missile interceptors in Poland and a related radar in the Czech Republic. That shield had been proposed under President George W. Bush.

    Russia condemned it is a threat to its security despite years of U.S. assurances to the contrary.

    In its place will be a different missile-defense plan relying on a network of sensors and interceptor missiles based at sea, on land and in the air. Obama says that adapts to the most pressing threat from Iran to U.S. troops and allies in Europe, potential attacks by short- and medium-range missiles.

    Yet at home and abroad, Obama's decision immediately raised a political question of whether it was done in part to appease Russia and win its help in other areas, mainly in confronting the potential of a nuclear-armed Iran. That point was underscored when Russia lauded the change.

    To Sen. Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican who is on the Senate Armed Services Committee, "This is going to be seen as a capitulation to the Russians, who had no real basis to object to what we were doing. And at the end of the day you empowered the Russians, you made Iran happy and you made the people in Eastern Europe wonder who we are as Americans."

    In the CBS interview taped Friday, Obama was pressed on why he did not seek anything in exchange from Russia.

    "Russia had always been paranoid about this, but George Bush was right. This wasn't a threat to them," Obama said. "And this program will not be a threat to them."

    He added: "If the byproduct of it is that the Russians feel a little less paranoid and are now willing to work more effectively with us to deal with threats like ballistic missiles from Iran or nuclear development in Iran, you know, then that's a bonus."

    Russia said Saturday that it will scrap a plan to deploy missiles near Poland since Obama dumped the planned missile shield in Eastern Europe.

    Russia's Deputy Defense Minister Vladimir Popovkin said Obama's move made the deployment of short-range missiles in the Kaliningrad region unnecessary, and he called the U.S. president's decision a "victory of reason over ambitions."

    Washington is counting on Moscow to help raise pressure on Tehran over its disputed nuclear program, although there are no clear signs that will happen.

    Also Sunday, Defense Secretary Robert Gates asserted that the United States is not walking away from European allies to appease Russia.

    "Russia's attitude and possible reaction played no part in my recommendation to the president on this issue," Gates wrote in an essay in The New York Times. He said he would be surprised if Russia likes the replacement European missile defense plan much better.

    Challenging Gates, Graham said, "If you are trying to tell me this has nothing to do with administration trying to get a better relationship with Russia, I don't believe you. What they did, in my view, undercut two good allies, the Poles and the Czech Republic."

    Gates acknowledged that one criticism of the replacement plan is that it relies heavily on fresh intelligence about the Iranian missile threat. The U.S. now judges shorter-range missiles as a greater problem in the near term than the long-range missiles the old system was conceived to counter. But he suggested it would have been foolhardy to stick with a plan that had become obsolete before it was built.

    "Having spent most of my career at the CIA, I am all too familiar with the pitfalls of over-reliance on intelligence assessments that can become outdated," wrote Gates, a former CIA director.

    That system never moved past the blueprint stage, and would not have been fully fielded until at least 2017.

    Part of the replacement system could be in place as soon as 2011, Gates said.

    Graham appeared on NBC's "Meet the Press."
     
  7. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    Al Jazeera English - Americas - Obama refutes Russia missile role

    UPDATED ON:
    Sunday, September 20, 2009
    19:55 Mecca time, 16:55 GMT

    Obama refutes Russia missile role

    [​IMG]
    The Bush administration had pushed for the plan as
    safeguard against any Iranian missile attack [AFP]




    The US president has denied that objections from Russia influenced his decision to abandon the previous administration's plans to site a missile defence system in Eastern Europe.

    Barack Obama said in an interview aired on American television station CBS on Sunday that it would be a "bonus" if the decision to scrap the plan eased co-operation with Russia.

    "The Russians don't make determinations about what our defence posture is. We have made a decision about what will be best to protect the American people as well as our troops in Europe and our allies," Obama said on the show "Face the Nation".

    The previous US administration under George Bush, Obama's predecessor, had planned the missile shield in Europe as the first line of defence against any attack from Iran.

    Russia had condemned the project as a threat to its security despite years of US assurances to the contrary.

    "If the by-product of it is that the Russians feel a little less paranoid and are now willing to work more effectively with us to deal with threats like ballistic missiles from Iran or nuclear development in Iran, you know, then that's a bonus."

    Obama on Thursday announced that the US was scrapping plans to place the missile defence shield in Poland and the Czech Republic.

    Alternative plan

    The Bush administration had pushed hard for the shield, arguing that Iran was developing long-range missiles alongside its controversial nuclear programme.

    Obama said that instead of a shield, there will be a different missile-defence plan relying on a network of sensors and interceptor missiles based at sea, on land and in the air.

    His announcement raised questions of whether the decision was done in part to appease Russia and win its help in other areas, mainly in confronting the potential of a nuclear-armed Iran.

    Vladimir Putin, Russia's prime minister, on Friday praised Obama's decision as "brave."
    "Russia had always been paranoid about this, but [former president] George Bush was right, this wasn't a threat to them," Obama said.
     

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