Obama supports India on UN Security Council

Discussion in 'Foreign Relations' started by RPK, Nov 8, 2010.

  1. RPK

    RPK Indyakudimahan Senior Member

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    http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/top/all/7284439.html

    Obama supports India on UN Security Council

    NEW DELHI — President Barack Obama backed India for a permanent seat on the U.N. Security Council Monday, a dramatic diplomatic gesture to his hosts as he wrapped up his first visit to this burgeoning nation.

    Obama was making the announcement in a speech to India's parliament on the third and final day of his visit. In doing so, he fulfilled what was perhaps India's dearest wish for Obama's trip here. India has been pushing for permanent Security Council membership for years.

    THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

    NEW DELHI (AP) — President Barack Obama has come out in support of India for permanent membership on the United Nations Security Council.

    It's an important gesture to Obama's Indian hosts on his first visit, and a sign of the value the U.S. places on strengthening its relationship with India.

    The president told India's parliament that he looked forward to "a reformed U.N. Security Council that includes India as a permanent member."

    Getting a U.S. endorsement for membership was considered to be at or near the top of India's wish list for the president's visit. But officials stressed that he's supporting the move only in the context of larger Security Council reforms, which could take years.


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  3. RPK

    RPK Indyakudimahan Senior Member

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  4. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    Well well.. That officially makes 4 out of 5 members agreed our entry. Majority wins. So, when do we send our UN representative for P-6 seat? Preferably a Kashmiri Pandit! :)
     
  5. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    UNSC carrot comes with a stick: Obama nudge on Iran, Myanmar

    While saying that the US would welcome India as a permanent member of a reformed United Nations Security Council (UNSC), President Barack Obama also said that with “increased power comes increased responsibility”.

    The remarks are significant as they come two months before India becomes a non-permanent member of the UNSC. While he made the remarks broadly in the context of supporting India’s candidature in a reformed UNSC, the two areas he raised — the democratic process in Myanmar and Iran’s nuclear programme — are those on which India and the US have had differences in the past.

    The first issue Obama raised was Iran and called on India to meet “international obligations”. “Together, the United States and India can pursue our goal of securing the world’s vulnerable nuclear materials. We can make it clear that even as every nation has the right to peaceful nuclear energy, every nation must also meet its international obligations —- and that includes the Islamic Republic of Iran,” the US President said in his address before both Houses of Parliament.

    While India has voted twice at the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) referring Iran to the UNSC, it has also joined the recent statement by the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) raising concerns over the procedures followed in verifying certain elements of the agency’s report. Also, Indo-Iran joint venture on shipping — Iran O Hind — was placed under UN sanctions list in the latest round.

    Obama said the US is looking to work with India on enforcing of sanctions. “We look forward to working with India — and other nations that aspire to Security Council membership — to ensure that the Security Council is effective; that resolutions are implemented, that sanctions are enforced; that we strengthen the international norms which recognise the rights and responsibilities of all nations and all individuals,” he said.

    The second issue the US President raised was Myanmar, a matter on which Obama was far more candid. Referring to the elections in the country, he asked India to take a stand on the matter. “If I can be frank, in international fora, India has often shied away from some of these issues. But speaking up for those who cannot do so for themselves is not interfering in the affairs of other countries. It’s not violating the rights of sovereign nations,” he said.

    Obama asked New Delhi to condemn the military regime in Myanmar. “Faced with such gross violations of human rights, it is the responsibility of the international community— especially leaders like the United States and India — to condemn (the same),” he said.
     
  6. thakur_ritesh

    thakur_ritesh Administrator Administrator

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    I think it is time india floated the idea of one by one at a time takes a plunge and once in works for the other members to join in with in the G4, as the things stand today india and brazil have the strongest candidature for the high tables so the two should make the move.

    To generate a wider consensus and support for the present G4 and possibly for more countries for the high tables in the general assembly is going to be that much more difficult. From what I have read, there is a support for india with in the GA of atleast 150 member states and with the US now supporting india’s bid there is every likely hood a lot of other elitists will also fall in line, so if india was to promote its own candidature there is every likely hood that the GA member countries will overwhelmingly support the move to expand the UNSC of which india would be a permanent member, which would mean the first hurdle of the GA wont be that difficult a task to achieve which would also mean nullifying the efforts of the coffee club and Pakistan in particular.

    With 4 out of 5 supporting at the P5 the ride is comparatively easier now and with US supporting the dynamics change a lot dramatically but then we would require an all over consensus since there remains the veto that china could use against us and I am of the opinion that much like what was seen on the indo-US nuke deal at the NSG where every vote was vital, china wouldn’t want to be isolated on the issue, more so since india is their neighbor and they have a huge stake economically in the US which means they are more prone to listen and follow to what the US asks them to do today. If we were to do it asap it would also showcase us the real intent of the US.

    To begin with india within the next one odd year needs to take up the membership of the four technology control regimes, give a very good showing at the UNSC so that countries appreciate the work done by us which should be used as an opportunity to give a glimpse of what to expect off india if we were to be a permanent member and then unleash an all out effort to get india to the high tables. Another point remains, china in another 10-15 years would be at an all together different level and then to make them support our candidature would be all the more difficult, as of date US wields enough clout on them to get them supporting us and it remains in the interest of the US to have us as P6 since they would want more clout there with india’s support.

    The earlier we do it the better else all the effort is going to be pointless, its all about “time” honey!
     
  7. ganesh177

    ganesh177 Regular Member

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    Hu jinato wud be coming next month, i wonder what would be his answer to the question posed by journalist if china supports india's bid for permanant UN seat. Can he afford to say that china will be standing in india's way ?

    Another thing, that US has in past supported japan, germany for same seat in past, so why wud this seat come to india ? How do we beat japan and germany ?
     
  8. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    A UN seat without veto is useless.The advantage of being in UN permanent council is in blocking nothing else
     
  9. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    The reformation of the UN and the UNSC is still a long way off.
     
  10. RPK

    RPK Indyakudimahan Senior Member

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    A Moment for UN Security Council Reform


    http://www.cfr.org/publication/23346/moment_for_un_security_council_reform.html


    U.S. President Barack Obama's surprise announcement of support for India's permanent membership in the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) is a bold foreign policy stroke. Beyond deepening the U.S.-India strategic partnership launched by the Bush administration, it may help break the logjam that has kept the UNSC's permanent membership mired in the world of 1945.
    The rationale for India's candidacy is obvious. The world's largest democracy with more than 1.2 billion people, India has a dynamic, fast-growing economy, the world's fifth-largest navy, and an impressive army with a distinguished role in international peacekeeping. India is increasingly at the forefront of efforts to police the global commons and combat transnational terrorism and, although not a member of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty regime, has established a strong record over the past decade in combating nuclear proliferation. India, simply put, has the assets to become a bulwark of world order.
    Indians, who have long regarded permanent UNSC membership as the holy grail of Indian foreign policy, are naturally ecstatic. What Obama did not provide, however, was any strategy for bringing UNSC reform about. The president should follow up on his dramatic announcement by launching a comprehensive plan for Security Council enlargement, based on clear criteria for permanent membership.
    The rationale for expanding the UN Security Council's permanent membership is powerful. To be effective and legitimate, the world's premier watchdog for international peace and security must reflect the contemporary distribution of power, so that it enjoys the political support (and draws on the resources) of the world's most capable states. The current list of "permanent five" members--the United States, Russia, China, the United Kingdom, and France--is notable for its omissions.
    The United States has geopolitical interests in expanding the UNSC's permanent membership. The time for a globally dominant state to cede some power to rising ones is when it can still dictate the terms of the shift. As noted in a recent CFR workshop in New Delhi, the United States can help relieve its strained resources (PDF) by sharing some of the privileges and burdens of global leadership.
    Because immediate UNSC enlargement would be a gamble, Obama should declare U.S. support for a gradual approach to expanding UNSC membership, based on clear criteria for membership (advocated in a forthcoming Council Special Report I co-authored with Kara McDonald: UN Security Council Enlargement and U.S. National Interests). These criteria would include a demonstrated capacity to contribute to international peace and security, including contributions to the UN and membership in good standing with major international security regimes.
    Based on these criteria, the most logical candidates for permanent membership, in addition to India, would be Japan, Germany, and Brazil--four great democracies. By setting such criteria, and winning support among the veto-wielding P5 for their application, the United States can help ensure that candidates for UNSC permanent membership are prepared to accept not only the privileges, but the weighty obligations of membership.
     
  11. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Security Council Won't Make Room For India Yet


     
  12. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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  13. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    I agree that Obama has shown intentions of a greater strategic partnership with India, but nowhere has he mentioned that Washington will be given as a gift to India!!

    Therefore, Washington Post remains to be a newspaper of the US till date.

    I appreciate you are a non smoker.

    But then your post does indicate you are smoking. It may not be tobacco, but it surely smacks of Afghanistan's Best!:emot0:
     
    Aayush likes this.
  14. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    NEW DELHI — By endorsing India for a permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council, President Obama on Monday signaled the United States’ intention to create a deeper partnership of the world’s two largest democracies that would expand commercial ties and check the influence of an increasingly assertive China.
    Mr. Obama’s announcement, made during a nationally televised address to the Indian Parliament, came at the end of a three-day visit to India that won high marks from an Indian political establishment once uncertain of the president’s commitment to the relationship. Even as stark differences remained between the countries on a range of tough issues, including Pakistan, trade policy, climate change and, to some degree, Iran, Mr. Obama spoke of India as an “indispensable” partner for the coming century.

    “In Asia and around the world, India is not simply emerging,” he said during his speech in Parliament. “India has emerged.”

    Mr. Obama’s closer embrace of India prompted a sharp warning from Pakistan, India’s rival and an uncertain ally of the United States in the war in Afghanistan, which criticized the two countries for engaging in “power politics” that lacked a moral foundation.

    It is also likely to set off fresh concerns in Beijing, which has had a contentious relationship with India and has expressed alarm at American efforts to tighten alliances with Asian nations wary of China’s rising power.

    But warmer ties between the United States and India, in the making for many years, come at a crucial time for Mr. Obama. He and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh are headed to South Korea later this week for a meeting of the Group of 20, apparently in agreement on what is expected to be a significant clash between the world’s big powers over the United States Federal Reserve’s plan to boost the American economy by pumping $600 billion into it.

    China, Brazil and Germany have sharply criticized the move by the independent Fed, which they see as intended to push down the value of the dollar to boost American exports. Germany’s finance minister equated the move to currency manipulation “with the help of their central bank’s printing presses.”

    But at a Monday news conference, Mr. Obama defended the Fed’s move and won backing from Mr. Singh, who spoke about the United States’ critical importance to the global economy.

    “Anything that would stimulate the underlying growth and policies of entrepreneurship in the United States would help the cause of global prosperity,” he said.

    The good will between Mr. Obama and Mr. Singh, as well as the almost giddy reaction to the president and his wife, Michelle, in the Indian press, lent a glossy sheen to a United States-India relationship that is still evolving.

    India remains deeply protective of its sovereignty, while the United States is accustomed to having the upper hand with its foreign partners. On Monday, Mr. Singh emphasized the need for the two countries “to work as equal partners in a strategic relationship.”

    “For India, going back to the earliest days since independence, there has always been a very strong attachment to strategic autonomy,” said Teresita C. Schaffer, director of the South Asia program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. “Americans throw around the word ‘ally’ with gay abandon.”

    Mr. Obama arrived in India on Saturday bearing a big gift: his decision to lift longstanding export controls on sensitive technologies, albeit with some of the specifics still unclear. And the president also made several small-bore announcements about new collaborations between the nations on everything from homeland security to education, agriculture and open government.

    Many Indian analysts said Mr. Obama had big shoes to fill, given the popularity here of his two predecessors. President George W. Bush is viewed with admiration, largely for his work securing a civil nuclear cooperation pact. And former President Bill Clinton, who in 2000 became the first American president to visit India in two decades, is fondly remembered for his gregarious personality and his own speech in Parliament, credited for reviving the relationship.

    The headline moment of the trip was Mr. Obama’s announcement on the United Nations seat, even though the endorsement is seemingly as much symbolic as substantive, given the serious political obstacles that have long stalled efforts to reform membership of the Security Council.

    All the major powers have said the post-World War II structure of the Security Council, in which the United States, Britain, France, Russia and China have permanent seats with veto power, should be changed to reflect a different balance of power. But it could take years for any changes to be made, partly because there is no agreement on which countries should be promoted to an enlarged Security Council.

    The United States has promised to support a promotion for Japan and now India. China is viewed as far less eager for its Asian neighbors to acquire permanent membership in the Council.

    But administration officials and independent analysts emphasized the significance of the president’s political message.

    Ben Rhodes, a top foreign policy adviser to Mr. Obama, said the endorsement was intended to send a strong message “in terms of how we see India on the world stage.” Meanwhile, in Washington, even critics who had blamed Mr. Obama for letting the relationship with India drift reacted with praise — and surprise.

    “It’s a bold move — no president has said that before,” said Richard Fontaine, a former adviser to Senator John McCain who wrote a critical report of Mr. Obama’s India policy last month for the Center for New American Security. “It’s a recognition of India’s emergence as a global power and the United States’ desire to be close to India.”

    But any outreach to India is bound to cause problems for Mr. Obama in Pakistan. In Islamabad, Pakistan’s Foreign Ministry warned that Mr. Obama’s decision would further complicate the process of reforming the Security Council. Pakistan, the ministry said in a statement, hopes the United States “will take a moral view and not base itself on any temporary expediency or exigencies of power politics.”

    For Mr. Obama, the Pakistan-India-United States nexus creates a delicate dance. The Obama administration is selling warplanes to Pakistan, a move viewed with suspicion here.

    During his three-day visit, the president faced criticism for being too soft on Pakistan; during a question and answer session with college students, one demanded to know why he had not declared Pakistan a “terrorist state.” And even Mr. Singh, standing by the president’s side at a joint news conference Monday, reiterated India’s position that it could not have meaningful talks with Pakistan until it shut down the “terror machine” inside its borders.

    But if Mr. Obama’s cautious language on Pakistan provoked initial unease, his speech at Parliament seemed to put the matter to rest when he called on the Pakistani government to eradicate “safe havens” for terrorism groups and prosecute the perpetrators of the November 2008 terrorist attacks in Mumbai that killed at least 168 people.

    “Indians were keen to listen to two ‘p’ words,” said Rajiv Nayan, a strategic affairs analyst in New Delhi. “Permanent membership of the United Nations Security Council and, second, on Pakistan.”

    Neil MacFarquhar contributed reporting from the United Nations.
     
  15. Sri

    Sri Regular Member

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    I agree with the assessment that this will make good headlines and real movement will be slow. However, this is also a next step that was due and it's good that it has happened. Which is the bigger announcement - President Bush & the Nuclear Deal -or- President Obama and the UNSC Permanent Seat Support?
     
  16. S.A.T.A

    S.A.T.A Senior Member Senior Member

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    Obama's official endorsement of Indian candidature for a permanent seat in the UNSC in the national parliament did not sound like just any platitudes.After declaring that he liked to see Indian in the UNSC as a permanent member,he started lecturing on how 'great power comes with great responsibility' and how we must support UN sanctions et al,looked to me like Obama was trying to seek reassurance from India on promises we may have committed in return for the UNSC seat.This endorsement did not seem just for the headlines,looks part of a plan already panned out and nitty gritties ironed out...... If BJP had a heads up on this announcement,this probably explains its barely conceived irritability during the course of this visit.
     
  17. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    China ready for consultation with India over UNSC reform


    BEIJING: Sounding positive to US President Barack Obama's endorsement of India's bid for permanent seat in the UNSC, China today said it understands New Delhi's "aspirations" to play a bigger role in the UN and is ready for consultations with it over reform of the world body.

    "China values India's status in the international affairs and understands India's aspirations to play a greater role in the United Nations and is ready to keep contact and consultations with India and other member states on the issues of Security Council reform," Chinese Foreign Ministry Spokesman, Hong Lei said during a media briefing.

    "China supports reasonable and necessary reform of the UN Security Council and will maintain priority to giving more representation to developing countries at UNSC so that they can play bigger role in Security Council," Hong said.

    He said China wants democratic and patient consultations over the issue.

    "We hope all parties should continue to have democratic and patient consultations so as to reach a package of consensus on reform related issues so that negations will become a process to narrow differences, safeguard unity and realise a win-win scenario," he said.

    Asked about Obama's assertion that US would also support India's membership for Nuclear Suppliers' Group (NSG), Missile Technology Control Regime, the Australian Group and the Wassenaar Arrangement, Hong said all countries should respect their international obligation of non-proliferation.

    "China believes that countries under the precondition of respecting the international obligation of non proliferation have the right to make peaceful use of nuclear energy and conduct international cooperation in this field. Meanwhile it should safeguard the integrity and effectiveness of the international non proliferation regime," he said.

    "We hope that cooperation between relevant countries could contribute to regional peace stability and development."

    The issue of India's permanent membership to the UNSC has always figured high in the talks between Indian and Chinese leaders.

    The issue was raised during President Pratibha Patil's visit to Beijing this year as well as Foreign minister S M Krishna's visit earlier.

    "China understands India's aspirations at the UN" was the standard phrase it came up with during the talks sounding cautious and ambivalent on the complex UNSC reform process.

    China has also voted for India's candidature to the non-permanent seat at the UNSC.

    Obama's endorsement of India's membership leaves only China to take a stand on the issue as the other four of the five permanent members — US, Russia, Britain and France — have already conveyed their support for New Delhi's elevation to the top organ of the world body.

    Read more: China ready for consultation with India over UNSC reform - The Times of India http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/6895366.cms#ixzz14n2q6AhX
     
  18. pankaj nema

    pankaj nema Senior Member Senior Member

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    The Pakistani people badly needed a big dose of reality check to see where their country is now placed.

    So if the Indian establishment first managed to prevent Obama's visit to Pakistan the final BLOW to Pakistani pride was Obama's support for India's candidature at UN security council.

    Hopefully PAkistani young generation will now see beyond Zamid Hamid and See where there Strategic depth and other theories have bought their country

    In the last few days Alcohol sales must have doubled in Pakistan so that Pakistanis could drown their sorrows
     
  19. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    We should show good gesture to them and supply them with large quantities of alcohol by mixing alcohol in indus from kashmir.
     
  20. SHASH2K2

    SHASH2K2 New Member

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    Alcohol is haram in land of pure. better gift some camels goats and sheep to them . That will give some pleasure and they will all forget their sorrow.

    :emot0:
     
  21. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Obama backs Inida UNSC bid to contain China:US media


     

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