NRIs moving from the US to India: How much salary to expect

Discussion in 'Economy & Infrastructure' started by santosh10, Oct 30, 2014.

  1. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    NRIs moving from the US to India: How much salary to expect

    That story probably made news only because of its star power. The fact that NRIs from the US are moving back to India is no shocking development. NRIs have, in the last few years, been relocating to India in large numbers, in search of better personal and professional lives. And if you are an NRI considering that move, there is one important thing that you must understand very well: the salary you will get in India.:ranger:

    Kris Lakshmikanth, Founder CEO of The Head Hunters India Pvt Ltd. says, "When it comes to compensation, we find that NRIs have inflated expectations. They mainly go by hearsay; their friend or friend's friend who returned to India has told them a tall story about Indian salaries. They want to go by that yard stick."

    USD will not convert to INR

    The first thing to remember is that you will not make the rupee equivalent of your US salary in India. The cost of living in India is significantly lower than that in the US. This also means a lower labour cost in India. These factors will determine your India salary. Seema Nair, Co-Leader India HR Operations of Cisco India explains, "The salary in India (for Cisco employees moving from US to India) is related to local labour market wage rates with a potential premium for critical skill sets."

    Achyut Menon, head of Options Executive Search Pvt Ltd also adds, "In the nineties, people who were posted to India got expat salaries. But those days are over. In the last 10 years, India has become an attractive market for global companies who are not just looking to set up offshore centers here, but also to capitalize on the growing, educated and highly aspirational middle class consumer segment. Added to that is the availability of skilled labour within India itself. Companies no longer need to pay expat salaries."

    Benchmark: What then should be the broad benchmark?

    Both Lakshmikanth and Menon say that while there cannot be a standard formula, the Big Mac Index is a good guideline to calculate salaries. The Big Mac index published by The Economist, is based on the theory of purchasing-power parity (PPP), according to which exchange rates should adjust to equalise the price of a basket of goods and services around the world. The basket in this case being a McDonald's Big Mac.

    Now according to the last available index dated July 2011, a Big Mac costing USD 4.07 in the US costs USD 1.89 in dollar terms in India (Rs 85 converted at an exchange rate of Rs 45). It means that the Big Mac costs 54% less in India; the cost of living is 54% lower in India. Read another way, this means that the rupee is undervalued by 54% to the dollar and that on the basis of PPP, one dollar would actually be worth Rs 21 instead of Rs 45.

    So if you are drawing a salary of USD 100,000 in the US, you can expect to draw Rs 21 lakh in India, give or take. At an exchange rate of Rs 45, that would translate to an Indian salary of USD 46,666 or 46% of the US salary. :ranger:

    "Senior management can expect anywhere between 40% and 70% of their last drawn US salary when they move to India," Menon explains, adding, "At the 70% end would be people who have moved to India to set up a development/ engineering center or to head the global company's India start-up."


    Best career move

    Having set that broad benchmark, the salary would also vary between industries and functions. You would need to choose your profile and company carefully to maximise your salary.

    "Manufacturing would pay less than technology. Within technology, we find that delivery of software is something which Indian companies have become masters in. They don't need to employ people from overseas. In fact, such people from the US are paid less than the person who stayed back in India because those returning from the US have handled fewer people teams as compared to peers in India," Lakshmikanth points out.

    Similarly, domestic Indian companies do not usually recruit NRIs for strategic positions if the NRIs are not familiar with the dynamics of the Indian market and work place.

    As an NRI moving back to India, Menon says it would be best to join a company in the US which has plans to start-up/ expand in India. "A lot of US companies across sectors like engineering, legal, analytics, financial services, pharmaceuticals are setting up operations in India. :cheers:

    These companies are happy to send an Indian to India who also has experience of their other markets. The employee benefits because he can grow with the company's operations in India. In the beginning, the company will set up a 30-40 staff office and expand going forward. As a member of the start-up, the employee grows as the company grows, making it a win-win for both" he explains.

    Parting shot

    "At the end of the day, come back to India for the same reasons you went abroad: for personal and professional growth and happiness. Come with a long term view in mind and you won't regret it," Menon advices.

    (The author is a chartered accountant and financial writer. She also blogs at blogs.economictimes)

    NRIs moving from the US to India: How much salary to expect - Economic Times
     
  2.  
  3. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    Global crisis forces reverse migration by up to 30 pc: Experts

    MUMBAI: With concerns over the global economic situation and reports on growing unemployment, there is a rise in reverse brain drain by up to 30 per cent, according to experts.

    "The reverse drain has been seen across the industries and various geographies across the globe, including the US, Canada, Australia and Europe. The number of people wanting to come back to India has gone up by 25-30 per cent as compared to pre-economic crisis," International Management Institute (IMI) Professor Satish K Kalra told PTI.:ranger:

    The main reason that Indians working overseas are planning to relocate is because India Inc have started paying better and working in the country continues to offer global exposure and they feel their skills have higher value on return and better career prospects, he said.

    The country's sustained growth even during uncertain times coupled with world class higher education system, like IITs and IIMs, and higher sense of belonging that makes them emotionally bound to their careers and society add further to this decision, he said.

    "It could bring in acceleration of learning in some of the niche fields like biotech, automobile, construction, oil and gas," Kalra added.

    The returning Indians would have got exposed to better technologies in these fields and it would be easier for India Inc to embrace this and the local workforce would gain from this new experience, he said.

    "We could also see a more disciplined workforce as returning Indians would cultivate a respect around time boundaries and ability to work without follow ups," he said.

    He added that many large global consulting firms have also opened their research centres in India and most of them have dedicated industry practices such as oil and gas, alternate energy and construction, etc.

    "The availability of professionals having spent time in these domains is a beneficial situation for KPOs and one of the reasons for their increasing numbers," he said.

    Indian KPOs account for almost 70 per cent of global volumes, and the global KPO market is expected to grow to USD 17 billion by 2013-14, according to industry experts.

    VistaMind CEO Arks Srinivas said Indian market due to its global as well as domestic factors has created a need for skilled and experienced labour and hence the generation of more and more jobs.

    "The Indian market is customer centric and with an increase in the purchase power of the consumer, employment generation is at an all time high," he said.

    There are sectors in the Indian economy, which are still growing or at least not seeing a downturn, education and health are two such sectors that will remain productive for more time to come, he said.

    "While the financial industry is in doldrums, the ability to get jobs in marketing and sales of any sector will still be possible and re-skilling would be the way to go," Srinivas said.

    ApnaCircle.com Founder and CEO Yogesh Bansal said it is very typical of every Indian to want to work in the West, however, lately these countries have been struggling to provide employment to their own people. :ranger:

    "As mentioned the suffering sectors are mostly IT, banking and marketing professionals," he added.

    However, countries like Africa land Southeast Asia, which are expanding their businesses and starting new industries, are increasingly open to hiring globally skilled talent for mid-level to senior jobs, Srinivas said.

    Professionals from India are uniquely suited for these jobs because they have the experience of working in an emerging market, he added.

    Global crisis forces reverse migration by up to 30 per cent: Experts - Economic Times
     
  4. DingDong

    DingDong Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2014
    Messages:
    2,227
    Likes Received:
    3,664
    Location:
    Delhi
    Lot many Indian professional are heading to places like Nigeria.
     
  5. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    @W.G.Ewald

    @Ray

    sir, while discussing the expected salary for the NRI professionals coming back to India, as in the article of the first post of this thread, we first find 37% labor force of US have no jobs. and over 53% workers of US are failing to get $30,000+ salary there, which translate to hardly 18lacs in Indian rupees, while purchasing power of US$ and Indian Rupees in India is certainly different......

    so this simply means that once you lose your professional jobs, following the shift of Industries of US to developing countries, you would better move to an emerging economy like ASEAN, India, China etc. as we do know that industries would only grow in emerging economies while the bail-out seeking industries based in US/EU have limited scope in future. :ranger:

    =>

    i have practical experience of watching EU's immigrants seeking casual jobs in Sydney but majority of them fail to get even $15/hour, which hardly means for $600 a week for 40 hours a week, means hardly upto $30,000 a year before tax, for 50 weeks of a year. and it does make sense as we find European/US's backpackers coming from US where they haven't reached even $10.10/hour minimum wage yet. more than 20% of UK's workers work for less than the minimum wage in UK......

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  6. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow

    Younger CEOs paid more in India than US

    MUMBAI: A new breed of younger Indian CEOs is rewriting the rules of the compensation game. In the process, they are topping their American and European peers to stand out as the highest paid executives globally, something which was once the exclusive preserve of executives from companies based outside India. :ranger:

    The average annual salary for an Indian CEO below the age of 50 years now stands at Rs 7.9 crore. Compared with the Rs 7.3 crore that American corner office occupants earn and Rs 7.8 crore pocketed by European bosses, it highlights the rising salaries of younger CEOs, especially in promoter-run firms in India.

    Younger Indian CEOs may have stolen a march over their global peers in the salary sweepstakes but overall, Indian CEO salaries are substantially lower than their international counterparts. This was revealed in a study by global recruitment firm Randstad, which was commissioned by TOI to compare the differentials that exist between salaries of Indian CEOs vis-a-vis their western counterparts.

    The compensation of Indian CEOs, though growing sharply, is still 45% lower than their American peers and 21 % lower than European CEOs. However, the gap in salaries when compared to European CEOs is shrinking faster, especially in the manufacturing, energy and infrastructure segments, the study points out. Indian CEOs received an average salary of Rs 6.3 crore.

    The study is based on conversion of international salaries to Indian rupees by applying a Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) conversion factor of 20.224. This basically means that the exchange rate is adjusted so that identical goods in two different countries have the same price when expressed in the same currency. As a representative sample, Randstad took into consideration companies that form the BSE100 (for India), FT100 (for Europe) and S&P100 (for US) indices as of August 20, 2012. All long-term benefits like stock options were excluded.

    "With current levels of inflation, and if India's GDP shows higher growth, the gap between salaries in India will come closer to the levels of the western world. The younger Indian CEOs are compensated better, because there is a higher concentration of promoter CEOs in this group. We can see that in sectors like manufacturing, energy and infrastructure, first-generation promoters are passing on the CEO mantle to their heirs and other family members," says Balaji E, MD & CEO, Randstad India.

    However, the trend of promoter CEOs earning more than professional CEOs is not restricted to the younger lot. Across India Inc, promoter CEOs earn 53% higher than professional CEOs, the study revealed.

    While professional Indian CEOs still need to catch up with their international peers, the gap in the average salary is highest in the information technology, telecom and communications, finance, retail, media and entertainment sectors, closely followed by the consumer goods industry. In the manufacturing, energy and infrastructure segments, the compensation of Indian CEOs is at par with the European CEOs due to the higher concentration of promoter CEOs in these two segments.

    "Today, more and more Indian CEOs get compensated at world-class levels. This trend is driven by several factors. Firstly, it speaks of the professionalization of management and secondly, the most critical constraint to growth is the availability of general managers. It is just pure supply and demand. Finally, professional managers have a considerable set of opportunities to choose from. The broad implication is that, going forward, India cannot become competitive by playing cost arbitrage but has to master the innovation game," says Vijay Govindarajan, professor at Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College and a part of the celebrated Thinkers 50 group.

    Some Indian executives, however, think that the differences in the way salaries are structured for Indian CEOs compared to their western counterparts would continue for a while. "There is a difference between CEO compensation in India as compared to the US and Europe. American CEOs, in particular, and businesses have much greater risks attached to them. The stress that leaders undergo makes them demand far greater compensations whereas in the Indian context, the time lines for performance and the risk factor is much lesser," says Hari T, chief people officer at IT services major Mahindra Satyam.

    Indian CEOs from the manufacturing segment earned the highest at Rs 8.7 crore, followed by CEOs from consumer goods with an average salary of Rs 5.6 crore.:ranger: The other significant point to have emerged from the study is that private sector CEOs are compensated 21 times more than public sector CEOs. With an average salary of Rs 6.3 crore, private sector CEOs are compensated far better than their public sector counterparts, who earn an average compensation of Rs 0.3 crore. The salaries of CEOs of the public sector do not include benefits and perquisites provided to those in the private sector.

    Rajeev Chopra, CEO and MD, Philips Electronics India, is more pragmatic and refuses to buy into the euphoria over increasing salaries of Indian CEOs. "Broadly speaking, compensation has always been and will continue to be a function of a myriad factors, such as the prevailing salary structure in the country's job market, the specific industry, the business situation a particular company finds itself in, etc. Therefore, clearly, a 'one size fits all approach' has not worked and may not work in the context of global salaries."

    Be that as it may, due to the increasing complexities of Indian businesses, salaries can only go up.

    Besides, comparisons would never cease considering salaries remain the biggest point of discussion across management levels in global businesses.

    Younger CEOs paid more in India than US - The Times of India
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2014
  7. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow

    here we are talking about the professionals coming back to India from the western nations, with western qualifications and experience from there :thumb:

    but its not surprised if an Indian qualification holder professional, with limited work experience, gets a job in Africa and move there. many mining projects there have been attractive for limited experienced Indian professionals based in India, who look to earn bit more than what they are earning in India :thumb:
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2014
  8. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    Reverse brain drain: India beckons non-resident citizens home with plum salaries
    January 03, 2013

    Country is expected to create nearly 50,000 jobs for NRIs :thumb:

    The overseas Indian community (non-resident Indians, NRIs) is estimated at over 25 million and is spread across every major region in the world. Many of these, now overseas residents, went abroad to study and many never came back.

    The reason – there were better jobs and plum salaries to strive for in foreign countries.

    This is a problem that India has faced over the decades but now it’s trying to move away from being a country that specializes in importing labour. To get its people back home, the country is creating jobs for its overseas citizens. The latest figures from job portal Naukri.com shows that nearly 50,000 jobs will be made available this year to lure some of these defectors, particularly the high-quality academics and professionals, back to their home country. :thumb:

    The figure seems a drop in the ocean considering the huge number of Indians living aboard but signals a change, welcoming the returnees.

    Each year, the number of jobs specifically targeted at NRIs, have gone up. The organised sector in India is set to create about 49,215 new jobs for non-resident Indian professionals in the calendar year 2013 with 43 per cent more jobs compared to 2012. Last year, the country was able to create around 27,983 jobs, reveals the latest results of MyHiringClub.com & NriJobPortal.com NRI Professional Employment Trend Survey 2013.

    The survey is based on 4453 companies across 12 industry sectors in 11 major cities and indicates that most employers are optimistic about their hiring plans for NRI professionals in the New Year. :thumb:

    “An increasing number of valued NRI professional recruitment will likely take place in 2013. This is a good sign for retaining talent in India. I believe job opportunities are most in Bangalore and most of the NRIs who are seeking to come back are tech professionals,” said Rajesh Kumar, CEO, MyHiringClub.com & NriJobPortal.com.

    IT & ITeS (11450) will offer the maximum number of jobs to NRIs. This is followed by FMCG (8930), automobile & manufacturing (7341), infrastructure (4894), pharma & healthcare (3245), telecom (1391) and banking & financial services (1391). :ranger:

    Bangalore is the city where most jobs will be created (11894), followed by Delhi & NCR (10320), Mumbai (6780), Chennai (5490), Kolkata (3290) and Hyderabad (2189).

    Even though the country seems to be luring the professionals back home, workers under the unskilled and semi-skilled category are still flocking to other countries for better pay.

    "We have not seen any huge upsurge in the numbers returning to India so far. Every year, there are one to two lakh (100,000 to 200,000) workers who return to India, usually at the end of their work contracts," Minister of Overseas Indian Affairs Vayalar Ravi was quoted in the Indian media nearly one year back. :ranger:

    The ministry tracks the movement of semi-skilled and unskilled Indian workers to the Gulf and other countries.

    As per the reports, the Indian government processes six to eight lakh emigration check required (ECR) passports of workers who travel to the Gulf countries and some other countries.

    This number seems to have gone up, as per the data of the ministry. For the current financial year in India, the number is about 6.1 lakh (600,100), which shows an increase in the number of Indian workers leaving the country for work abroad.

    Reverse brain drain: India beckons non-resident citizens home with plum salaries - Emirates 24/7
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2014
  9. DingDong

    DingDong Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2014
    Messages:
    2,227
    Likes Received:
    3,664
    Location:
    Delhi
    Indian professionals going to Africa is not exactly brain drain. Several Indian companies are now expanding their businesses in African countries and Indian professionals are in high demand. My point is that west is no longer the only destination for the Indian professionals seeking good assignments.
     
    santosh10 likes this.
  10. prohumanity

    prohumanity Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2013
    Messages:
    889
    Likes Received:
    546
    Location:
    USA
    The fact is that a lot of NRI's who have lived in US for many many years do not want to go back due to children wanting to stay in US. Money at that point is life is not the primary factor as they can do with less income. I see a growing trend in NRI (above the age of 60) to spend half of the year India and remaining half of the year in US . Many are considering retiring in India after age 65-70. For younger NRI's ,much depends on where US economy finally goes..if it keeps declining..jobs will become harder to get, racism will increase and uncertain success can hinder immigration to US. For now, things are OK. What if US dollar goes down (almost certain to happen in next 5 to 10 years) as China, Russia, Iran, Venezuala, India (to some extent) and many other nations are gradually moving away from dollar as trade currency. It can reduce US salaries in real terms for foreign workers.Another major factor will be ...what happens to Googles, Yahoos, Microsofts of the World if many major nations block them and use their own national search engines and e commerce companies such as AliBaba etc. The growth of US mega tech firms will stall or decline causing job scarcity. Next 5 years are crucial to watch as there are new mega trends are shaping up in the World. Banking is also seeing a major change with BRICS BANK, Asian Infrastructure Bank etc.are being born...if this trend accelerates, western banking industry will take a hit. Wildest card is Middle East turmoil....sucking US resources..for decades ! Sabre rattling and threatening Russia-China Axis can possibly backfire with especially bad consequences for Europe. But, Europe and US economies are very intertwined. food for thought.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2014
    santosh10, TrueSpirit1 and Peter like this.
  11. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    thats very true. i even know many professionals in Australia, who have been visiting Africa for many projects, mainly mining projects i heard. :ranger:
     
  12. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    14,140
    Likes Received:
    8,528
    Location:
    North Carolina, USA
    Why does santosh10 need attention from me? He knows I consider him the 2nd most useless poster on DFI. His need for recognition for his cut & pastes are truly pathetic.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  13. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    14,140
    Likes Received:
    8,528
    Location:
    North Carolina, USA
    And a pathetic, needy cretin.
     
  14. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    Ray sir gave me your name to discuss few topics about the USA, so i did feel sharing few news about US with you.

    but i will take care of your concerns in future. thanks

    :thumb:
     
  15. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow

    Can't buy a home in Mumbai? Blame the NRIs
    June 17, 2012

    Mumbai: If you're wondering why the property rates in Mumbai aren't going down, blame it on Non Residential Indians (NRIs). With the rupee falling against the dollar every day, Indians living abroad have increased their investment in the country and especially in Mumbai, meaning that the expected fall in property rates following the recent dry period in the real estate market has not materialised.

    According to a real estate source, the real estate prices in Mumbai for a person staying in the Middle East are 25-30 per cent less than what an Indian would pay. Prakash Rohera of Khar-based Kkarma realtors said, "I know about clients from the Middle East and other western countries who were earlier ready to shell out Rs. 1 crore but have now hiked it to Rs. 1.30 crore. Some don't even mind going as high as up to Rs. 1.60 crore. NRIs are investing heavily in Mumbai." :ranger:

    "Just a few months ago, builders were chasing clients to buy property, and everyone was expecting the property prices to come down, but the uncontrollable inflation means that most builders are now getting calls from NRIs who want to invest. Why will builders reduce the prices when they are making their share of money anyway?" explained a broker, on condition of anonymity.

    Meanwhile, a property exhibition that's being organised in Dubai later this week is already flooded with calls from Indian builders as well as NRIs. A spokesperson for the exhibition said, "The number of builders from Mumbai participating in the exhibition is 15 per cent higher than in earlier years. For NRIs, this is like a sale. The property price has fallen by nearly 25 per cent due to the devaluation of the rupee. We're expecting good business this time."

    Manohar Shroff, secretary, Maharashtra Chamber of Housing Industry, Navi Mumbai, also claims the falling rupee is helping to boost the sale of properties in Mumbai. "The increased investment by NRIs has increased sales," he said.

    Realty expert Ajay Chaturvedi opines, "There's a slowdown in many western countries, but their currency is still stronger than ours. The falling rupee is making it easy for NRIs to invest here. They all plan to return to India someday, so why not invest in Indian properties," he said. :thumb:

    Can't buy a home in Mumbai? Blame the NRIs
     
  16. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow
    double post
     
  17. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,270
    Location:
    011
    E Bola Kya Bola ?
     
  18. Bhadra

    Bhadra Defence Professionals Defence Professionals Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2011
    Messages:
    6,687
    Likes Received:
    2,357
    Dear NRI Friends,

    Do not look at the amount of money and compare it in terms of equivalence after converting dollars into Rupee or vice versa.

    Consider and look into purchasing power parity ...

    What do you want ... After all it is the quality of life !!!!!

    Capability to hire a servant ? which you never had in USA or Europe ?
    Capability to own two cars - one for yourselves and one for your wife and Kids..
    Capability to live in a big apartment ... a dream for you in USA..

    Dream and desire to achieve something " for yourselves and your society" - you can do former in USA but not the latter..

    Being treated as a Sahib or a Bhadrapurusha in Indian society rather than a pest in the west.. a migrant and second rate man/ woman.

    Having a purpose of life..

    Having a known safe or unsafe environment..

    Being closer to or together with your kith and kins, relatives and friends..
    and finally dying in India where you were born.. in Indian life outlook - a big thing...

    In many ways , a peon of the government lives a better life in India than many of you.

    Do think over it...
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2014
    Bangalorean, pmaitra and santosh10 like this.
  19. santosh10

    santosh10 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2014
    Messages:
    1,666
    Likes Received:
    174
    Location:
    Lucknow

    the main reason behind this type of reverse migration is mainly because of Industrial shift of Industries to the emerging markets. as you do know that there is a limited space to grow in future for a bail-out seeking US's firm, while most of the MNCs have got their production line in the emerging markets like India itself, where there is always a demand....

    when you work for an Indian firm, you know that even if this firm is paying rupees, it will only grow while a the same isn't going to be true in OECD's markets. once i applied for job in Ford Australia but i had to move to Perth as per my visa condition in 2005. while now Ford plant is totally moved out from Victoria, and only Holden Car is maintaining its production line because of an Australian car, on the back of hefty support from the government. and its simply means that you would now imagine that all daily manufactured products like TVs, fridge, cars, bulb, shoes etc all are imported. i was once discussing, my first laptop in Sydney was a made in Japan sony laptop, while even sony Laptops are made in China now. even if its major parts are imported from Japan, we now find its production line shifted to China to an extent :facepalm:

    only high tech industries have any business left in a OECD market where the labor cost is very high. and its also they are losing with a set pace.....
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2014
  20. Ancient Indian

    Ancient Indian Unplugged Version Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2014
    Messages:
    2,038
    Likes Received:
    1,604
    Location:
    Everywhere
    People who left their mother when they see some flashy future don't deserve our country.
    It is not Midiji that they see in india.
    It is AI that is scaring them off that Heavy Industry Country.
     
  21. Bangalorean

    Bangalorean Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    6,207
    Likes Received:
    6,497
    Those who still convert "Dalllarrrs" to rupees and ogle at the converted salaries, are fools. Our media morons keep bringing out articles like "IIM grad lands 1.2 crore package". The morons mention later in the article, that the job is based out of San Francisco or Seattle!

    In general, divide the final salary by 4 to get the real picture, which will take Purchasing Power Parity into account. A package of "1.2 crore" actually comes to Rs. 30 lakh per annum, if you take purchasing power parity into account. Of course, that isn't too bad either. But the point is, this idiocy of direct currency conversion needs to stop.

    The problems with living in India are w.r.t. bad public infrastructure. That's it. In every other field, India gives you a much superior quality of life. Top-notch healthcare at extremely cheap rates. Domestic helps and a variety of people to do odd jobs. Family support structure, familiarity, constantly growing economy with increasing opportunities, etc.
     
    santosh10 likes this.

Share This Page