Now, it's yoga instead of routine drills for BSF jawans

Discussion in 'Internal Security' started by pmaitra, Aug 3, 2016.

  1. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Now, it's yoga instead of routine drills for BSF jawans

    NEW DELHI: Border Security Force (BSF), country's largest border guarding force, has decided to replace the routine physical training drills for its jawans and officers with yoga.

    The decision to replace the daily 45-minute physical training drills with yoga at all its units was taken by BSF Director General K K Sharma after 1,900 personnel of the force recently completed a special training under the tutelage of Baba Ramdev+ at his facility in Uttarakhand's Haridwar.

    "Yoga has been made mandatory in the force and the jawans and officers will now undergo regular training in this skill. The routine PT exercises will be replaced by yoga," officials said.

    An officer said added that a committee of senior officers of the force has been constituted that will suggest if, apart from yoga, any other physical exercises are required to be included in the daily regime of the 2.5 lakh personnel-strong force.

    Ramdev had conducted a special 10-day session for the personnel of the force at his Patanjali yoga institute which ended earlier this week.

    KK Sharma had recently said the paramilitary force has decided to "intensify" yoga training of its troops and the aim is to have at least one trainer in this discipline in each platoon-level formation.

    A platoon, comprising about 35 personnel, is the minimum strength of an operational team in the force.

    Yoga acts as a stress buster and it is important for the men and women of the force, as they are deployed in some of the most difficult areas as part of their duties in border guarding and internal security domain, the BSF Director General had said.

    BSF guards India's two important borders with Pakistan and Bangladesh apart from conducting anti-Naxal operations in the Left Wing Extremism hit states of Chhattisgarh and Odisha.

    ________________________

    Commentary:
    • Introduce yoga. Nothing wrong with it. But why replace the routine drills?
    • What is wrong with the routine drills that was standard SOP for years?
    • Who comes up with such "bright" ideas? Was it from the Home Minister, Rajnath Singh? BSF falls under the Home Ministry, so he is obviously a stakeholder.
    • Is this at all going to help the BSF jawans, or hurt their preparedness?
    • What is the role of Baba Ramdev here? Is he trying to get his minions jobs with the government as yoga trainers? Is this intended to help the forces, or meant to benefit certain business interests? If so, what next? Ramdev's noodles as standard diet for the jawans?
     
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  3. Ancient Indian

    Ancient Indian Unplugged Version Senior Member

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    No one replacing routine drills. They must be adding yoga to it. TOI report are not reliable.

    Even our swayamsevaks go through drills to keep body in check. Why would BJP do that to Armed Forces?

    Get your facts first. It is sickie article..
     
  4. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    The news article says they are replacing PT with yoga. I think I got my facts straight from ToI. Moreover, the same thing has been reported in other news papers also. You can cross-verify.
     
  5. aditya10r

    aditya10r PHAK MU LUCK Senior Member

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    doest TOI means TOIlet paper..........................................................................................
     
  6. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    No, it means Times of India.

    Let's have a debate instead of trolling please.
     
  7. HariPrasad-1

    HariPrasad-1 Senior Member Senior Member

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    This is a great idea.It is very important to keep Jawans fit mentally as well as physically. And nothing but yoga can offer this combo. They should be trained in Some Mudras etc. That shall make them very very fit to deal with all kind of climate. Their food habits shall also improve. Their stress and other problems shall also improve. I watched that training. Swami Ramdev advised them to plant and use certain Ayurvedic medicine so that their immunity may also improve. They must keep exploring the ways to keep Jawans fit.
     
  8. aditya10r

    aditya10r PHAK MU LUCK Senior Member

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    the quality of content is no less than toilet paper
     
  9. Ancient Indian

    Ancient Indian Unplugged Version Senior Member

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    It's your choice. You can believe those sources and stay in dark as long as you wish.

    I am saying again, we are fitness freaks. BJP won't let soldiers lose their fitness.
     
  10. Bornubus

    Bornubus Senior Member Senior Member

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    Yoga shouldn't be made compulsory for Jawans secondly i doubt the veracity of the news that PT is being replace by Yoga.
     
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  11. Rahul Singh

    Rahul Singh Senior Member Senior Member

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    I don't know about authenticity of this report. But if purpose of general PT drill is to provide flexibility to joints and muscles then a Yoga routine ( a combo Pranayaam and Aasanas) can certainly provide more. Yoga routine can meet complete flexibility requirements as well as provide inner strength to the body.
     
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  12. Berkut

    Berkut Regular Member

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    My $0.2

    Ryan Giggs attributed yoga as his secret for being able to play for Man U even in his 40s.
    Yoga especially in a high pressure job should be compulsory.
    A BSF soldier patrols enough to keep his body fit enough.
     
  13. Rahul Singh

    Rahul Singh Senior Member Senior Member

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    BSF personal deployed in hot zones like Kutch and Thar can benefit a lot from Sheetali Pranayama. It cools the body from inside, relaxes body, tranquilizes mind etc.

     
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  14. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    • It was reported in the news article. If you can provide a news article stating otherwise, feel free to post. I will give credibility to reputable news sources, not some silly blogs like Yugaparivartan of known propensity towards myth peddling.
    • I will believe something reported in multiple news sources over your repeated insistence that it is not true.
    • Such type of gimmics are not unexpected from a ruling party that derives its support from blind devotees.
    • RSS was not mentioned in the news article, so no need to bring RSS in this. Personally, I couldn't care less whether RSS are fitness freaks or not. The concern is with shoving down some half baked beliefs upon the armed forces.
     
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  15. Rahul Singh

    Rahul Singh Senior Member Senior Member

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    Yoga for anxiety and depression
    Harvard Mental Health Letter

    Studies suggest that this practice modulates the stress response.

    Since the 1970s, meditation and other stress-reduction techniques have been studied as possible treatments for depression and anxiety. One such practice, yoga, has received less attention in the medical literature, though it has become increasingly popular in recent decades. One national survey estimated, for example, that about 7.5% of U.S. adults had tried yoga at least once, and that nearly 4% practiced yoga in the previous year.

    Yoga classes can vary from gentle and accommodating to strenuous and challenging; the choice of style tends to be based on physical ability and personal preference. Hatha yoga, the most common type of yoga practiced in the United States, combines three elements: physical poses, called asanas; controlled breathing practiced in conjunction with asanas; and a short period of deep relaxation or meditation.

    Many of the studies evaluating yoga's therapeutic benefits have been small and poorly designed. However, a 2004 analysis found that, in recent decades, an increasing number have been randomized controlled trials — the most rigorous standard for proving efficacy.

    Available reviews of a wide range of yoga practices suggest they can reduce the impact of exaggerated stress responses and may be helpful for both anxiety and depression. In this respect, yoga functions like other self-soothing techniques, such as meditation, relaxation, exercise, or even socializing with friends.

    Taming the stress response
    By reducing perceived stress and anxiety, yoga appears to modulate stress response systems. This, in turn, decreases physiological arousal — for example, reducing the heart rate, lowering blood pressure, and easing respiration. There is also evidence that yoga practices help increase heart rate variability, an indicator of the body's ability to respond to stress more flexibly.

    A small but intriguing study further characterizes the effect of yoga on the stress response. In 2008, researchers at the University of Utah presented preliminary results from a study of varied participants' responses to pain. They note that people who have a poorly regulated response to stress are also more sensitive to pain. Their subjects were 12 experienced yoga practitioners, 14 people with fibromyalgia (a condition many researchers consider a stress-related illness that is characterized by hypersensitivity to pain), and 16 healthy volunteers.

    When the three groups were subjected to more or less painful thumbnail pressure, the participants with fibromyalgia — as expected — perceived pain at lower pressure levels compared with the other subjects. Functional MRIs showed they also had the greatest activity in areas of the brain associated with the pain response. In contrast, the yoga practitioners had the highest pain tolerance and lowest pain-related brain activity during the MRI. The study underscores the value of techniques, such as yoga, that can help a person regulate their stress and, therefore, pain responses.

    Improved mood and functioning
    Questions remain about exactly how yoga works to improve mood, but preliminary evidence suggests its benefit is similar to that of exercise and relaxation techniques.

    In a German study published in 2005, 24 women who described themselves as "emotionally distressed" took two 90-minute yoga classes a week for three months. Women in a control group maintained their normal activities and were asked not to begin an exercise or stress-reduction program during the study period.

    Though not formally diagnosed with depression, all participants had experienced emotional distress for at least half of the previous 90 days. They were also one standard deviation above the population norm in scores for perceived stress (measured by the Cohen Perceived Stress Scale), anxiety (measured using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), and depression (scored with the Profile of Mood States and the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, or CES-D).

    At the end of three months, women in the yoga group reported improvements in perceived stress, depression, anxiety, energy, fatigue, and well-being. Depression scores improved by 50%, anxiety scores by 30%, and overall well-being scores by 65%. Initial complaints of headaches, back pain, and poor sleep quality also resolved much more often in the yoga group than in the control group.

    One uncontrolled, descriptive 2005 study examined the effects of a single yoga class for inpatients at a New Hampshire psychiatric hospital. The 113 participants included patients with bipolar disorder, major depression, and schizophrenia. After the class, average levels of tension, anxiety, depression, anger, hostility, and fatigue dropped significantly, as measured by the Profile of Mood States, a standard 65-item questionnaire that participants answered on their own before and after the class. Patients who chose to participate in additional classes experienced similar short-term positive effects.

    Further controlled trials of yoga practice have demonstrated improvements in mood and quality of life for the elderly, people caring for patients with dementia, breast cancer survivors, and patients with epilepsy.

    Benefits of controlled breathing
    A type of controlled breathing with roots in traditional yoga shows promise in providing relief for depression. The program, called Sudarshan Kriya yoga (SKY), involves several types of cyclical breathing patterns, ranging from slow and calming to rapid and stimulating.

    One study compared 30 minutes of SKY breathing, done six days a week, to bilateral electroconvulsive therapy and the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine in 45 people hospitalized for depression. After four weeks of treatment, 93% of those receiving electroconvulsive therapy, 73% of those taking imipramine, and 67% of those using the breathing technique had achieved remission.

    Another study examined the effects of SKY on depressive symptoms in 60 alcohol-dependent men. After a week of a standard detoxification program at a mental health center in Bangalore, India, participants were randomly assigned to two weeks of SKY or a standard alcoholism treatment control. After the full three weeks, scores on a standard depression inventory dropped 75% in the SKY group, as compared with 60% in the standard treatment group. Levels of two stress hormones, cortisol and corticotropin, also dropped in the SKY group, but not in the control group. The authors suggest that SKY might be a beneficial treatment for depression in the early stages of recovery from alcoholism.

    Potential help for PTSD
    Since evidence suggests that yoga can tone down maladaptive nervous system arousal, researchers are exploring whether or not yoga can be a helpful practice for patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    One randomized controlled study examined the effects of yoga and a breathing program in disabled Australian Vietnam veterans diagnosed with severe PTSD. The veterans were heavy daily drinkers, and all were taking at least one antidepressant. The five-day course included breathing techniques (see above), yoga asanas, education about stress reduction, and guided meditation. Participants were evaluated at the beginning of the study using the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), which ranks symptom severity on an 80-point scale.

    Six weeks after the study began, the yoga and breathing group had dropped their CAPS scores from averages of 57 (moderate to severe symptoms) to 42 (mild to moderate). These improvements persisted at a six-month follow-up. The control group, consisting of veterans on a waiting list, showed no improvement.

    About 20% of war veterans who served in Afghanistan or Iraq suffer from PTSD, according to one estimate. Experts treating this population suggest that yoga can be a useful addition to the treatment program.

    Researchers at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C., are offering a yogic method of deep relaxation to veterans returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan.
    Dr. Kristie Gore, a psychologist at Walter Reed, says the military hopes that yoga-based treatments will be more acceptable to the soldiers and less stigmatizing than traditional psychotherapy. The center now uses yoga and yogic relaxation in post-deployment PTSD awareness courses, and plans to conduct a controlled trial of their effectiveness in the future.

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    My comment:

    If someone can sum up all that is highlighted in red, one should understand the benefits of Yoga in a general conditioning routine of soldiers. Then the question is why replace age old practice of morning PT? Though i will reply properly after some more research. For time being i just want to reply with a counter question which is, why not if it can bring mental peace to soldiers who work in one of the most stressful areas? Yogic asanas are well known to bring flexibility to body and nobody here is asking to replace jogging, weight training and combat training drills with yoga.

    *** I will not reply with BJP, RSS and Baba Ramadev angle as my liking for yoga is not cheaply motivated. It is based on personal experience which of course started with my deepest belief in indigenous practices of health and medicine. .
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2016
    HariPrasad-1 likes this.
  16. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    You complete post is irrelevant.

    Nobody is opposed to introducing yoga into BSF. The problem is with replacing PT.

    Please read the opening post.
     
  17. Rahul Singh

    Rahul Singh Senior Member Senior Member

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    No it's not.

    The post speaks about the aspects related to the psychological benefits of yoga. And psychological health forms the core of overall health. Now when Asanas are added to it, a practitioner gets both inner heath as well as muscular conditioning (i hope it is well understood, or there is a need to post a link for it as well?). The purpose of PT on other hand is to provide muscular conditioning. But yogic Asanas cover much wider range. Anyone who has practiced both knows it.

    So why not replace PT with a routine which covers much wide aspects of health including psychological? Specially when number of soldiers committing suicide due to stress is already alarming?
     
  18. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    There is no debate on whether Yoga has benefits. Yes, it has its benefits. That is correct. The debate with replacing it with PT.

    Do you think Yoga is a substitute for PT? I don't think it is. Yoga and PT are very different things, and therefore, their benefits are also very different.
     
  19. Rahul Singh

    Rahul Singh Senior Member Senior Member

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    If you have seen a PT drill or done yourself (like i did in my NCC days) you should see the similarities. A PT is performed at higher speeds, it ups the blood pressure which is good as it helps in bringing up the metabolism and hence results in greater loss of fat and conditions muscles. On other hand Asanas are performed at slow pace hearth beat and blood pressure remains stable most of the time but some asanas can certainly make you sweat. Suryanamashkar for sure. Irrespective of it, these Asanas are known for reducing body fat and increasing flexibility of whole body apart from conditioning. Now add Pranayama( controlled breathing as some calls it) to it and you are covering much wider range of health. Which is complete flexibility and conditioning of muscles, a healthy heart, good BP and a sound psychological health.

    Now if you want to just add Pranayama to a PT routine and not replace it with yogic Asanas, then you can, and also reap the benefits very close. But again, 'very close' does not mean 'same'. Yogic Asanas covers much wider range of muscles than a PT routine does. So why settle for less.
     
  20. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    See in red. That is my point. They should not have replaced PT, IMO. They should have introduced Yoga and left it at that.

    P.S.: Yes, I have done lots of PT, marches, pyramids. The only thing I missed out on was shooting, because I missed camp, but I made up for that by shooting a massive variety here in the US.
     
  21. Rahul Singh

    Rahul Singh Senior Member Senior Member

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    Why? Same post you quoted has the answer. "But again, 'very close' does not mean 'same'. Yogic Asanas cover much wider range of muscles than a PT routine does. So why settle for less?"

    To add to that you don't have all day to do physical routines so you choose best for the finite time you got. You know units to be deployed in urban areas(read Kashmir) trains more in Krav Maga than their usual Taekwondo and Karate because of greater benefits former provides. For that if they have selected complete Yogic routine then it is for better. Interestingly, a PT routine makes you sweat heavily(because of higher BP and heart rate) and a Pranayama routine requires you to be cool and mostly in easy state to start with. Quite an improper combination!

     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2016

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