Norway plans to order 50 F-35 lightning stealth fighter ; sees no price change

Discussion in 'Military Aviation' started by Singh, Mar 7, 2012.

  1. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,270
    Location:
    011
    Japan says they plan to cancel F-35 orders due to price rise, Norway thinks price won't change much. ?

    =================


    March 5 (Reuters) - Norway's No. 2 defense official said he was more upbeat about the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program than in a long time after visiting a test site in California last week and meeting with the eight other partners on the program.

    Defense State Secretary Roger Ingebrigsten said on Monday that Norway was finalizing its plans to buy "approximately 50 fighters," but did not expect any significant cost increases to its order.

    Lockheed Martin Corp is developing three variants of the radar-evading, supersonic fighter jet for the United States and eight partner countries - Canada, Britain, Australia, Turkey, Denmark, Norway, Italy and the Netherlands.

    Senior U.S. officials last week met with partner countries and sought to reassure them that Washington remains committed to the program, despite its own plans to postpone orders for 179 planes for five years.

    That decision, driven by U.S. budget pressures, could delay cost savings that will be realized once production is ramped up.

    "We think that we are going to pay close to what we said we would in 2008," Ingebrigsten told Reuters by telephone after returning from his U.S. visit. "The main approach will be the same as it has been since 2008."

    He declined to provide details ahead of the Norwegian government's submission to parliament in two weeks. Previous plans called for Norway to buy 56 aircraft for 61 billion Norwegian crown ($10.89 billion), in undiscounted 2011 crowns, or 72 billion crowns when a greater contingency is counted.

    "I can't say we're going to do exactly what we said in 2008 but our plan is to procure approximately 50 fighters," he said.

    The slowdown in U.S. orders and budget constraints at home have prompted some of the partners to rethink their own orders. Italy last month cut its planned buy of 131 planes by 30 percent and others may follow suit.

    U.S. officials insist Washington still plans to spend $382 billion to buy a total of 2,443 fighters for the Air Force, the Navy and Marine Corps, the costliest weapons program ever.

    TEST SITE, FIRST FLIGHT

    Ingebrigsten led a Norwegian delegation to Edwards Air Force Base in California last week to visit one of two key test sites for the new fighter.

    "I haven't been so optimistic related to the F-35 ... for a long time," Ingebrigsten said.

    He said Friday's meeting of officials from the Pentagon, Lockheed, and the eight partner countries was useful, with all sides citing their continued support of the program. Canada hosted the meeting at its embassy in Washington.

    He praised U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and his deputy, Ashton Carter, who made a brief appearance at the meeting, for their willingness to be transparent about the program, and said U.S-Norwegian bilateral ties were strong.

    The member countries will finalize their purchase plans ahead of a formal military-level March 14-15 meeting in Australia of representatives from all nine countries.

    Ingebrigsten said delays or cuts in orders from the United States and Italy, among others, could be bad news for the program, but they would be partially offset by orders from Japan, and possibly South Korea and Singapore in coming years.

    Separately, officials at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida said the F-35A, the conventional takeoff and landing variant developed for the U.S. Air Force, would have its first flight at the base on Tuesday morning.

    Test pilots will fly the planes initially as they test out the syllabus for the program that will be used to teach Air Force and Marine Corps pilots to fly the new plane.

    Norway upbeat on F-35; Florida test flight set | Reuters
     
  2.  
  3. ice berg

    ice berg Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2011
    Messages:
    2,145
    Likes Received:
    289
    The debate is still going on. But we are more or less stuck with f-35.
     
  4. indian_sukhoi

    indian_sukhoi Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2009
    Messages:
    957
    Likes Received:
    224
    Location:
    Hyderabad, India
    Actually Norway do have an option.

    Regarding about price, JSF isn't getting any cheaper. Almost every foreign customer are concern with price rise up.


    Something tells me, They might end up buying Saab Gripen or maybe Rafale!!


    Btw, How is their relations with Sweden?
     
  5. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    2,783
    Location:
    Gangtok, Sikkim, India
    Gripen has been offered to the Norwegians many times. In fact, there was this article I was reading somedays back where it was mentioned that the Swedes had planned Gripen sales as a "scandinavian" or northern European fighter meant for itself, Norway, Demark and Finland. However, the political pressure and arm twisting by USA got the best of all the three northern countries and they ended up with F-16s in their kitty.

    Hopefully Gripen NG might be able to realize its dream if F-35 falls out.
     
  6. ice berg

    ice berg Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2011
    Messages:
    2,145
    Likes Received:
    289
    Gripen was rejected a few years ago. Which understandably pissed of the swedish.

    It could be both political pressure and technical requirements.
     
  7. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    4,404
    Likes Received:
    2,783
    Location:
    Gangtok, Sikkim, India
    I doubt it is technical requirements. Swedish air force Gripens have outperformed USAF pilots in RED FLAG which is as close to real combat as you can get in peacetime. Norway and Sweden share same terrain, atmosphere, neighborhood, geo-political scenario etc. Why would their technical requirements not match Swedes?

    Political pressure? Yes of course. Let's see; Denmark and Norway having more commonality with Swedes, found F-16 more superior (older versions) while Finland found a marine fighter F-18 Hornet as the most apt air force jet. Doesn't really match up what is called "reasonable explanations". Gripens were designed and developed with the worst in mind; A Soviet invasion. Don't see what else could be a bigger threat to Nordic nations today.
     
  8. ice berg

    ice berg Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2011
    Messages:
    2,145
    Likes Received:
    289
    We dont judge performance based on dog and ponny shows.

    Here is some reading.
    Svensk innrømmelse: – Gripen passer ikke Norge - tu.no/industri
    If you cant read norwegian, here is the google translation.

    Gripen can not fill all the requirements set Norway for its next fighter, admits the Swedish Defence Minister Sten Tolgfors on his blog.

    American, no doubt
    Last November it became clear that Norway chooses to buy new fighter jets from Lockheed Martin.

    Selects American fighter

    When appointed Defense Minister Anne-Grete Strøm-Erichsen F-35, also known as the JSF, which is the obvious choice instead of Jas-39 Gripen Next Generation (NG) from the Swedish Saab.

    - JSF meets all requirements of the four threat images, while the Gripen NG meets only the requirements of the international threat. JSF is considered to be better than the Gripen NG in all combat aircraft's main tasks - data collection and monitoring, as well as combat targets in the air, ground and surface, said Strøm-Erichsen.

    A few weeks went Strøm-Erichsen to Stockholm to give reasons for his Swedish colleague Sten Tolgfors face to face.

    Strøm-Erichsen will explain Gripen no wrecks in Sweden

    After the Swedish government analyzed the failed bid game in the neighboring country. The conclusion was clear this weekend.

    - Norway wanted a plane that could carry out ground attacks on their own over enemy-controlled territory, protected by long-range anti-aircraft and next-generation fighters. In such a perspective, including stealth characteristics are important. Gripen is designed to act autonomously, but is designed as part of a larger system such as support of the airborne radar, writes Tolgfors.

    Less weapons load
    Swedish Radio Ekot confronts the defense minister that the Gripen was also rejected in aerial combat in the Norwegian analyzes.

    - The scenarios are set up with very large distances, where the stealth characteristics and a small radar signature has had most to say, points out Tolgfors.

    He also points out that the Gripen is worse when it comes to the ability to carry ground attack weapons in addition to self defense weapons.

    - We do not prioritize attacks
    - Since Sweden and other potential exporting countries do not prioritize attacking abilities, so says the Norwegian evaluation relatively small gripe that the system would not fill our needs, writes Tolgfors on the blog.

    There are also shows that he still disagrees with Norway's calculation indicates that the Gripen is more expensive than the F-35. And not least, how Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg and Minister of Defence Anne-Grete Strøm-Erichsen presented the fighter selection.
     

Share This Page