Northrop Grumman X-47B

Discussion in 'Americas' started by LETHALFORCE, Dec 17, 2010.

  1. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=5252142&c=AME&s=SEA

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    The first unmanned aircraft designed as a carrier-based strike jet is almost ready to take to the air for the first time, U.S. Navy officials have confirmed.
    The U.S. Navy's X-47B unmanned strike aircraft, as shown in Palmdale, Calif. (Northrop Grumman)

    Northrop Grumman's X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration (UCAS-D) drone has been performing taxi tests for several weeks at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., as engineers run the aircraft through a long series of pre-flight tests and checks.

    Program officials had hoped for a flight by mid-December, but weather and other factors have delayed the event. Officials were reluctant to specify an exact date, but are hopeful the flight will take place before the end of the year.

    Two X-47Bs have been built by Northrop's Integrated Systems sector under a 2007 development contract. The stealthy aircraft, which resembles a miniature B-2 bomber - also built by Northrop - is intended to test the concept of operating a small, unmanned, combat jet from aircraft carriers.

    Although numerous technical and command-and-control issues need to be addressed to bring the concept to maturity, war planners have routinely been using X-47s in war games as part of a carrier strike group. In some cases, they have even swapped out the manned air wing for an all-UCAS wing, with, reportedly, great success.

    Northrop's work on the program includes the design and development of airborne precision-guided positioning system algorithms to help navigate the aircraft, and autonomous aerial refueling technology to keep the planes aloft - perhaps for several days at a time.

    The first plane was to have taken to the air in late 2009 under the original contract, with the first at-sea tests on a carrier to have been in 2011, but those dates have been pushed back. Initial seagoing tests now are scheduled for early 2013.

    The single-engine, tailless X-47B has a wingspan of 62 feet and is 38 feet long. It is designed to carry 4,500 pounds of weapons in its payload bay, reach high subsonic speeds, and fly to altitudes of about 40,000 feet. Without refueling, it should be able to operate at ranges up to 2,100 nautical miles and stay in the air for more than six hours.
     
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  3. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    U.S. Navy X-47B Unmanned Combat Aircraft Completes Historic First Flight

    Northrop Grumman-built U.S. Navy X-47B Unmanned Combat Aircraft Completes Historic First Flight
    UNITED STATES - 4 FEBRUARY 2011

    First-of-its-Kind, Tailless Aircraft Moves Closer to Carrier Trials in 2013

    EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif., Feb. 4, 2011 -- Today, the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE: NOC)-built U.S. Navy X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration (UCAS-D) aircraft successfully completed its historic first flight at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), Calif.

    Conducted by a U.S. Navy/Northrop Grumman test team, the flight took off at 2:09 p.m. PST and lasted 29 minutes. This event marks a critical step in the program, moving the team forward to meet the demonstration objectives of a tailless fighter-sized unmanned aircraft to safely take off from and land on the deck of a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier.

    "First flight represents the compilation of numerous tests to validate the airworthiness of the aircraft, and the robustness and reliability of the software that allows it to operate as an autonomous system and eventually have the ability to take-off and land aboard an aircraft carrier," said Capt. Jaime Engdahl, the Navy's UCAS-D program manager.

    Northrop Grumman is the Navy's UCAS-D prime contractor and leader of the UCAS-D industry team.

    "Designing a tailless, fighter-sized unmanned aircraft from a clean sheet is no small feat," said Janis Pamiljans, vice president and UCAS-D program manager for Northrop Grumman's Aerospace Systems sector."Commitment, collaboration and uncompromising technical excellence among the Navy, Northrop Grumman and the UCAS-D team industry partners made today's flight a reality.We are indeed honored to have given wings to the Navy's vision for exploring unmanned carrier aviation."

    Taking off under hazy skies, the X-47B climbed to an altitude of 5,000 feet, flew several racetrack-type patterns, and landed safely at 2:38 p.m. PST. The flight provided test data to verify and validate system software for guidance and navigation, and the aerodynamic control of the tailless design.

    As with all test programs, first flight represents the culmination, verification and certification of pre-flight system data collected and analyzed by both the Navy and Northrop Grumman.Airframe proof load tests, propulsion system accelerated mission tests, software maturity and reliability simulations, full system taxi tests, and numerous other system test activities were all completed and certified prior to first flight.

    The aircraft will remain at Edwards AFB for flight envelope expansion before transitioning to Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., later this year. There, the system will undergo additional tests to validate its readiness to begin testing in the maritime and carrier environment.The UCAS-D program is preparing the X-47B for carrier trials in 2013.

    The Navy awarded the UCAS-D prime contract to Northrop Grumman in August 2007.The six-year contract calls for the development of two X-47B fighter-sized aircraft. The program will demonstrate the first-ever carrier launches and recoveries by an autonomous, unmanned aircraft with a low-observable-relevant planform. Autonomous aerial refueling will also be performed after carrier integration and at-sea trials.

    Northrop Grumman's industry team includes GKN Aerospace, Lockheed Martin, Pratt & Whitney, Eaton, GE, Hamilton Sundstrand, Dell, Honeywell, Goodrich, Moog, Wind River, Parker Aerospace and Rockwell Collins.


    On Feb 4, 2011, Northrop Grumman and the U.S. Navy helped launch the next century of naval aviation with the successful first flight of the X-47B Unmanned Combat Aircraft. Conducted at Edwards AFB, Calif., the 29-min flight is a critical first step toward demonstrating that a tailless, fighter-sized unmanned aircraft can safely operate from the deck of a U.S. aircraft carrier.
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    Source: Northrop Grumman Corporation
     
  4. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    U.S. Navy X-47B Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicle (UCAV):

    The X-47B will be an autonomous, low-observable strike fighter-sized transformation al, carrier-capable unmanned air vehicle with the potential to perform multiple roles including Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance, and Time Sensitive Targeting/Strike.

    X-47B Specifications:

    Wingspan: 62.1 ft ( = 18.9 meters )
    Length: 38.2 ft ( = 11.6 meters )
    Altitude: > 40,000 feet
    Range: > 2,100 nautical miles ( more than 3,889 kilometers)
    Top Speed: High subsonic
    Power Plant: Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-220U

    System Provisions:

    Autonomous Aerial Refueling: Probe & Drogue (USN), Boom Receptacle (USAF)
    Weapons Bays: 4,500 pounds (= 2,041 kilograms)
    Sensors: EO/IR/SAR/ISAR/GMTI/MMTI/ESM

    Photo: X-47B Unmanned Combat Aerial Vehicle (UCAV)
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    Illustration: X-47B (UCAV) would be capable to take-off and land from U.S. Navy Aircraft Carriers

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    Last edited: Feb 5, 2011
  5. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Video: U.S. Navy X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System First Flight:

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
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  6. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Northrop Grumman-built U.S. Navy X-47B Unmanned Combat Aircraft Completes Historic First Flight

    UNITED STATES - 4 FEBRUARY 2011

    Core News Facts:

    •On Feb. 4, 2011, Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) and the U.S. Navy successfully conducted the historic first flight of the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration (UCAS-D) aircraft.

    •The flight, which was conducted under hazy skies at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB), Calif., began at 2:09 p.m. PST and lasted 29 minutes.

    •The flight is a critical first step for the Navy/Northrop Grumman UCAS-D team toward demonstrating that a tailless, fighter-sized unmanned system can safely land and take off from the deck of a U.S. aircraft carrier.

    •The flight provided test data that will contribute to the verification and validation of the X-47B's air vehicle's guidance and navigation software, and the aerodynamic control of its tailless design.

    •First flight represents the culmination, verification and certification of pre-flight system data collected and analyzed by both the Navy and Northrop Grumman. Prior to the flight, the test team demonstrated airworthiness of the airframe through proof load testing; propulsion system reliability through accelerated mission tests; software maturity and reliability through rigorous simulations; and overall system reliability through low speed and high speed taxi tests.

    •The X-47B aircraft will remain at Edwards AFB for flight envelope expansion before transitioning to Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md. later this year. There, the system will undergo additional tests to validate its readiness to begin testing in the maritime and carrier environment.

    •The UCAS-D program is preparing the X-47B for carrier trials in 2013.

    Quotes:

    •"First flight represents the compilation of numerous tests to validate the airworthiness of the aircraft, and the robustness and reliability of the software that allows it to operate as an autonomous system and eventually have the ability to take-off and land aboard an aircraft carrier." – Capt. Jaime Engdahl, UCAS-D program manager, U.S. Navy

    •"First flight is a giant confidence boost to the entire UCAS-D industry team. It provides us with important momentum as we now to turn to demonstrating that this first-of-its-kind air system can not only fly, but also integrate smoothly with carrier operations." – Capt. Jaime Engdahl, UCAS-D program manager, U.S. Navy

    •"Designing a tailless, fighter-sized unmanned aircraft from a clean sheet is no small feat. Commitment, collaboration and uncompromising technical excellence among the Navy, Northrop Grumman and the UCAS-D team industry partners made today's flight a reality." – Janis Pamiljans, vice president and UCAS-D program manager, Northrop Grumman.

    •"The Northrop Grumman-led UCAS-D industry team is honored to have given wings to the Navy's vision for exploring unmanned carrier aviation." – Janis Pamiljans, vice president and UCAS-D program manager, Northrop Grumman.

    Program Background:

    •The Navy awarded the UCAS-D prime contract to Northrop Grumman in August 2007. The six-year contract includes the development of two X-47B fighter-sized aircraft.

    •The program will demonstrate the first-ever carrier launches and recoveries by an autonomous, unmanned aircraft with a low-observable-relevant planform. Autonomous aerial refueling will also be performed after carrier integration and at-sea trials.

    •Northrop Grumman's industry team includes GKN Aerospace, Lockheed Martin, Pratt & Whitney, Eaton, General Electric, Hamilton Sundstrand, Dell, Honeywell, Goodrich, Moog, Wind River, Parker Aerospace, and Rockwell Collins.



    Source: Northrop Grumman Corporation
     
  7. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    Great thread guys! I really hope that AURA also comes up soon enough (expected since French have allegedly signed cooperation agreement on assistance). The video is amazing. It is hard to believe that US is facing crunch when its warmachine is going even stronger than before.
     
  8. JayATL

    JayATL Senior Member Senior Member

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    ^^ that because of that excessive 800 billion dollar a year militray budget
     
  9. JayATL

    JayATL Senior Member Senior Member

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    all you that invested in Microsoft flight simulators games or in gaming . There is your future job. pilot this thing from a screen!
     
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  10. lurker

    lurker Regular Member

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    You're thinking of the predator which is required to have an operator, this one's supposed to actually be autonomous capable!

    That said there would likely be a 'pilot' on standby for combat ops and just in case.
     
  11. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    GKN Aerospace partnered with US Navy and Northrop Grumman for X-47B First Flight

    United States - 5 February 2011

    The US Navy/Northrop Grumman UCAS-D X-47B aircraft successfully completed its maiden flight yesterday with GKN Aerospace-developed and manufactured wings and fuselage structure. GKN Aerospace’s pioneering work was undertaken as part of a multi-year contract to design and manufacture the X-47B centre fuselage and wing components.

    The complex centre fuselage section of the X-47B has an aluminium and titanium construction while the aircraft’s wings contain an aluminium substructure covered with carbon epoxy skins measuring approximately 16 feet by 4 feet. Each wing supports a spoiler flight control surface and hosts fully integrated electrical and hydraulic routings. The wing design includes a fold capability allowing the air vehicle to achieve a smaller footprint for aircraft carrier stowage. GKN Aerospace also manufactures most of the fuselage composite skins and this tailless aircraft’s bay covers and actuated doors.

    Wing and fuselage design was completed by the GKN Aerospace Engineering Development Center in Nashville, TN and manufacture took place at the Company’s plant in St. Louis, MO. In total, over 650 separate metallic and composite elements per aircraft were manufactured and/or assembled by GKN Aerospace.

    Kevin Cummings, President and CEO, GKN Aerospace - Aerostructures North America commented: "Our work on this program truly exploits the unmatched skills of our company across complex, high performance metallic and composite manufacture. This is an extremely proud day for both the Northrop Grumman and GKN Aerospace teams that have shown total commitment to supporting the development of what is the first unmanned aircraft designed to withstand the forces involved in launch and recovery of the air vehicle from the deck of an aircraft carrier. We can now see their innovative engineering and manufacturing truly take flight on this transformational Navy program".



    Source: GKN Aerospace
     
  12. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Lockheed Martin Supports U.S. Navy and Northrop Grumman in X-47B UCAS-D Successful First Flight

    UNITED STATES - 7 FEBRUARY 2011

    PALMDALE, Calif., February 7th, 2011 -- The Northrop Grumman/U.S. Navy Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration (UCAS-D) program’s X-47B achieved successful first flight at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., on Feb. 4. Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] congratulates the U.S. Navy and the Northrop Grumman-led [NYSE: NOC] industry team on accomplishing this significant program milestone.

    Born from the former Joint Unmanned Combat Air Systems (J-UCAS) program, the X-47B is the Navy’s chosen air vehicle for demonstrating and validating that a tailless fighter-sized unmanned aircraft system can operate safely to/from aircraft carriers.

    Lockheed Martin brings its expertise and experience in all aspects of low observable design and air vehicle survivability to bear in the design and manufacture of X-47B’s aerodynamic edges, inlet lip and control surfaces, as well as the development of an all new arresting hook system.

    "At Lockheed Martin Skunk Works®, we are proud to have contributed to this historic event through our principal role on Northrop Grumman’s UCAS-D team," said Al Romig, vice president of Advanced Development Programs for Lockheed Martin Aeronautics. “We continue to capitalize on new technologies and increasingly cost-efficient methods of manufacturing to benefit new systems such as this one.”

    Lockheed Martin completed delivery of its UCAS-D hardware in December 2009 and supported aircraft build, proof test and other activities in preparation for this successful first flight. Lockheed Martin will continue to support further UCAS-D flight testing, as well as carrier flight operations.



    Source: Lockheed Martin
     
  13. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Northrop Grumman Completes Structural Proof Testing of Second X-47B Aircraft

    Northrop Grumman Completes Structural Proof Testing of Second X-47B Aircraft
    UNITED STATES - 14 MARCH 2011

    Tests Prove That Tailless, Unmanned Jet Can Operate Safely in All Planned Flight Test Environments

    PALMDALE, Calif., March 14, 2011 -- The U.S. Navy's second X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) will be able to withstand all of the structural stresses and strains associated with takeoff, flight and landing – including those uniquely linked with landing or taking off from the moving, pitching deck of an aircraft carrier. That's the conclusion of an analysis by a Navy/Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) test team following a rigorous, five-week series of structural proof tests of the jet's airframe.

    The tests on X-47B air vehicle 2 (AV-2), conducted at Northrop Grumman's X-47B assembly and test facility in Palmdale, were completed Jan. 24, one week ahead of schedule. Northrop Grumman is the Navy's prime contractor for the Unmanned Combat Air System – Demonstration (UCAS-D) program.

    "The proof tests validate the structural design of the aircraft, and give us confidence that we can operate this plane safely and reliably in all anticipated carrier environments," said Janis Pamiljans, vice president of the Navy UCAS program for Northrop Grumman's Aerospace Systems sector. "In particular, we now know that AV-2 can handle the stresses, strains and dynamic loads associated with catapult launches and arrested landings on the carrier deck, and air-to-air refueling."

    AV-2 is identical to the first X-47B UCAS demonstration aircraft (AV-1) – which successfully completed its historic 29-minute first flight at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. on Feb. 4 – except that it will be equipped with aerial refueling equipment. Northrop Grumman plans to use AV-2 to demonstrate unmanned air-to-air refueling – using both the U.S. Air Force's boom/receptacle approach and the Navy's probe and drogue approach – in 2014 as part of a technology demonstration related to the current UCAS-D contract.

    The proof testing performed on AV-2 simulated eight design conditions, such as a 3-G symmetrical pull up and a 2.4G rolling pullout; and five conditions expected to occur on the ground, including takeoff and landing, said Sarah Beaudin, Northrop Grumman's AV-2 manager.

    One of the ground tests included pulling on the nose gear (to simulate a catapult launch) and the tail hook (to simulate an arrested landing on the carrier deck) at the same time to provide a special combined load case for test with the required margins. One of the flight conditions simulated the forces produced by turbulence that could occur during air-to-air refueling, a more demanding requirement than that used to proof test AV-1 in 2009.

    "To perform the testing, we bonded pads to 200 points on the airframe surface, and then pushed and pulled on those pads using hydraulic jacks to simulate various static and dynamic load conditions," explained Beaudin. "By measuring the stresses and strains experienced by the airframe in this test environment, we'll also be able to measure and interpret more accurately the stresses and strains experienced during flight."

    Proof testing is one of the last few tests that AV-2 will undergo in Palmdale before its transition later this spring to Edwards Air Force Base for more system tests, taxi tests and first flight. Before that move occurs, the test team plans to test and calibrate the aircraft's fuel system, and paint the aircraft.

    Under a UCAS-D contract awarded in 2007, Northrop Grumman has designed, developed and produced two X-47B aircraft. In 2013, these aircraft will be used to demonstrate the first carrier-based launches and recoveries by an autonomous, strike-fighter sized unmanned aircraft. The UCAS-D program will also be used to mature relevant carrier landing and integration technologies, and to demonstrate autonomous aerial refueling by the X-47B aircraft.

    Northrop Grumman's UCAS-D industry team includes GKN Aerospace, Lockheed Martin, Pratt & Whitney, Eaton, GE, Hamilton Sundstrand, Dell, Honeywell, Goodrich, Moog, Wind River, Parker Aerospace and Rockwell Collins.


    The second X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System produced by Northrop Grumman has successfully completed a series of structural proof tests of the jet's airframe at the company's aircraft assembly facility in Palmdale, Calif. In the photo, technicians verify that the hydraulic jacks that push and pull on the airframe surfaces to simulate static and dynamic loads are installed properly. The tests prove that the tailless aircraft can withstand the structural stresses and strains associated with landing and taking off from the moving, pitching deck of an aircraft carrier.
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    Source: Northrop Grumman Corporation
     
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  14. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Northrop Grumman, U.S. Navy Complete Second, Third Flights of X-47B UCAS

    Northrop Grumman, U.S. Navy Complete Second, Third Flights of X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System
    UNITED STATES - 17 MARCH 2011

    EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif., March 17, 2011 -- Less than a month after completing the first flight of the U.S. Navy's X-47B UCAS-Demonstration aircraft, flight test engineers from Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) and the Navy have successfully completed the aircraft's second and third flights.

    The flights, both conducted at Edwards Air Force Base, mark the beginning of a process called envelope expansion during which the test team will begin proving that the tailless aircraft can perform safely over a broad range of altitudes, air speeds and operating weights.

    During the X-47B's 39-minute second flight on March 1, the aircraft flew to an altitude of 7,500 feet at speeds up to 200 knots. During its 41-minute third flight on March 4, the aircraft reached an altitude of 7,500 feet and a top speed of 180 knots. By comparison, the X-47B flew only to 5,000 feet at a top speed of 180 knots during its first flight Feb 4.

    "Conducting two flights of a brand new type of aircraft within one week, and both within a month of first flight speaks not only to the robust design of the X-47B aircraft, but also to the dedication and engineering skills of the joint UCAS-D flight test team," said Janis Pamiljans, vice president for the Navy UCAS program for Northrop Grumman's Aerospace Systems sector. "These flights continue to add momentum to the team's march toward demonstrating in 2013 that we can safely operate this tailless, low-observable-relevant air system on a Navy aircraft carrier."

    According to Phil Saunders, chief engineer for Northrop Grumman's Navy UCAS program, envelope expansion is designed to fully characterize the aircraft's flying qualities and prove that they match the system's performance requirements and the test team's predictions.

    "Over the next few flights, we'll continue to expand the envelope in terms of air speed, altitude and operating weight range," he said. "By gradually ramping up the complexity of requirements, we will systematically prove that this air system can safely take off, fly and land in all anticipated flight environments."

    Northrop Grumman and the Navy expect to complete the planned 49-flight envelope expansion program at Edwards Air Force Base before moving the first X-47B to Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., later this year, he added.

    One of the most important measures of performance, Saunders explains, is aircraft stability. The X-47B, which relies on high-speed computers to manage its flight control surfaces, must be able to adjust quickly and automatically to unpredictable environmental conditions such as air turbulence or cross winds.

    The recent test flights included a series of maneuvers designed to measure the aircraft's ability to maintain a smooth, level flying state in the presence of such conditions.

    The flight tests also confirmed that the X-47B's flush mounted air data system – a nod to its low-observable-relevant design – is accurately sensing and communicating the aircraft's air speed, a critical factor in takeoff and landing.

    In addition, the flight tests gave the team the opportunity to validate the aircraft's engine performance; its command and control system, and its ability to fly at a constant angle of attack and a constant rate of descent while on final approach to landing, simulating what it will have to do to make successful landing on an aircraft carrier.

    The Navy awarded the UCAS-D prime contract to Northrop Grumman in August 2007. The six-year contract calls for the development of two X-47B fighter-sized aircraft. The program will demonstrate the first-ever carrier launches and recoveries by a tailless, unmanned aircraft. Autonomous aerial refueling will also be performed after carrier integration and at-sea trials.
    Northrop Grumman's UCAS-D industry team includes GKN Aerospace, Lockheed Martin, Pratt & Whitney, Eaton, GE, Hamilton Sundstrand, Dell, Honeywell, Goodrich, Moog, Wind River, Parker Aerospace and Rockwell Collins.


    X-47B UCAS Completes Two Flights in One Week:

    Photo: The U.S. Navy's X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System prepares to land at Edwards AFB following the second of two test flights conducted within the same calendar week. The flights mark the beginning of flight test envelope expansion.

    [​IMG]


    Source: Northrop Grumman Corporation
     
  15. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    First flight of X-47B Air Vehicle 1 (AV-1) occurred at Edwards AFB on 4 February 2011
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  16. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    U.S. Navy/Northrop Grumman-led UCAS-D Flight Test Team Honored Twice by U.S. Air Force
    UNITED STATES - 16 MAY 2011

    SAN DIEGO | The U.S. Air Force has recognized for operational excellence the U.S. Navy/Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) flight test team that successfully conducted first and subsequent flights of the Navy's X-47B unmanned aircraft earlier this year.

    The team, which performed its work as part of the Navy's Unmanned Combat Air System Carrier Demonstration (UCAS-D) program, was honored at two levels by the Air Force Flight Test Center, Edwards Air Force Base, Calif.

    On April 18, the team was recognized by the 412th Operations Group as the Flight Test Team of the Quarter for its many notable achievements leading up to and including the X-47B's first flight on Feb. 4 and two additional envelope expansion flights in early March. The 412th Operations Group is part of the 412th Test Wing based at Edwards.

    On April 21, the 412th Test Wing also selected the UCAS-D flight test team as the Team of the Quarter, again in recognition of its consistent success with the X-47B flight test program.

    "Congratulations are in order for this high performing team," said Tom Soard, leader of Northrop Grumman's X-47B Flight Test Integrated Product Team. "We work day to day among the best flight testers in the world, so it's an honor to have our performance and professionalism recognized in this community. This award is not just a team award. It is a tribute to every member of the test team for doing what he/she knows is the right thing every day, and doing it safely, reliably and very well."

    The test team comprises flight test engineers and specialists from Northrop Grumman; Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md.; the Air Force Flight Test Center; and UCAS-D joint industry team members Pratt & Whitney and Lockheed Martin.

    Edwards Air Force Base is home to the Air Force Flight Test Center, the 412th Test Wing and the 95th Air Base Wing. The Flight Test Center's mission is to conduct and support research, development, test and evaluation of aerospace systems from concept to combat. Base test forces have played a vital role in virtually every aircraft to enter the Air Force inventory since World War II.

    The Navy awarded the UCAS-D prime contract to Northrop Grumman in August 2007. The contract calls for the development and flight testing of two strike-fighter-sized X-47B unmanned aircraft. In 2013, the program will demonstrate the first carrier launches and recoveries by a tailless, unmanned aircraft. Autonomous aerial refueling demonstrations are planned for 2014.



    Source: Northrop Grumman Corporation
     
  17. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    Re: U.S. Navy X-47B Unmanned Combat Aircraft Completes Historic First

    X-47B PERFORMS FIRST SHORE BASED ARRESTED LANDING


    http://defensetech.org/2013/05/06/video-x-47b-executes-shore-based-arrested-landing/#more-20180
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2013
  18. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    Re: U.S. Navy X-47B Unmanned Combat Aircraft Completes Historic First

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  19. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    Re: U.S. Navy X-47B Unmanned Combat Aircraft Completes Historic First

    [​IMG]
     
  20. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    Re: U.S. Navy X-47B Unmanned Combat Aircraft Completes Historic First

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  21. asianobserve

    asianobserve Elite Member Elite Member

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    Re: U.S. Navy X-47B Unmanned Combat Aircraft Completes Historic First

    Gentlemen,

    The future of naval air warfare has just landed...

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
    SajeevJino likes this.

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