No U-turn for India, US

Discussion in 'Foreign Relations' started by AVERAGE INDIAN, Jul 9, 2013.

  1. AVERAGE INDIAN

    AVERAGE INDIAN EXORCIST Senior Member

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    India and the US have gone too far out in their relationship and there is too much overlap of interests for them to backtrack only because the new incumbent in the US secretary of state is no friend of India. But John Kerry’s soft corner for Pakistan and lack of warmth for India come out sharp and clear.

    It was therefore happy augury that at a time when the China-Pakistan flirtation was in full flow Kerry made a symbolic gesture of reaching out to India while he skipped the Pakistan leg of his South Asia tour.

    The drift in the Indo-US relationship is for all to see. The strategic dialogue needed to be carried on and so it has been with Kerry’s visit. It would be prudent if Kerry realises that the US has much to gain by a steadfast co-operation with India and that the era of equating India with Pakistan in everything is over.

    Pakistan on its part has, almost as a reaction, rubbed in the strength of its partnership with China, with prime minister Nawaz Sharif breaking bread with the Chinese at a time when our defence minister A K Antony was struggling to curry favour with Beijing.

    Both the US and India have dragged their feet on the civil nuclear deal. The nuclear liability law was a bone of contention.

    American nuclear companies have still not entered the growing Indian market for setting up nuclear reactors as India has refused their calls to grant them immunity in an accident. The team of businessmen that Kerry brought along gave the distinct impression that there was a major effort to revive the stalled civil nuclear co-operation and to put it to commercial use.

    In the talks with Kerry, the prime minister complained of protectionism in the US. At the same time American companies are complaining about India’s barriers to market access. During the George Bush era of bonhomie, these companies used to speak up for India with the US administration, but today they are sore about lack of market access in India.

    One good thing that emerged from the Indo-US dialogue was a better rapport in a limited way between India and the US on how to tackle the phase after the pullout of 70,000 US troops from Afghanistan next year.

    India had been feeling left out of the process of US reconciliation with a section of the Taliban. By assuring New Delhi that India would not be overlooked or undermined John Kerry has held out a glimmer of hope for India but it is still not too reassuring a picture.

    “We will consult very closely with India and with others in the region,” Kerry said. But he was silent on endorsing a security contribution by India, due to an acute appreciation of Pakistan’s sensitivities. India’s strategic interests in peace and tranquility in Afghanistan is beyond question and India’s legitimate concerns cannot be brushed aside.

    Clearly, the era of viewing Pakistan with suspicion on account of its past and current record is over yet again for the Americans who are flirting with Pakistan again on the issue of the post-pullout Afghanistan, keeping India at arm’s length. This is a matter of concern for India which this country must continue to articulate. The Americans have until recently been past masters in sounding patronising towards India while equating it with Pakistan and doling out sermons for the Indian establishment. That attitude must not be allowed to return.

    India must continue to leverage the high potential of the Indo-US partnership. The Americans are keen to see their efforts fructify in getting contracts for Westinghouse, GE and Hitachi to construct nuclear power plants in India. One cannot shy away from the fact that had it not been for the Bush administration, India would not have had the doors opened for civil nuclear energy in the country.

    There has doubtlessly been a sense of alarm in India over the manner in which the American foreign surveillance agency, the NSA, that scans worldwide Internet data, has been intruding on the privacy of Indian citizens and encroaching on sensitive intelligence of official agencies with the help of companies such as Microsoft, Google, Yahoo and Facebook.

    “Yes, we are concerned and surprised about it,” external affairs ministry spokesperson Syed Akbaruddin said. But the Indian government’s response in general was subdued. There was a reluctance on the part of the Americans to discuss illegal accessing of Indian web accounts.

    According to UK’s Guardian newspaper, India was the fifth most tracked country. The daily claims to have acquired top secret documents about the NSA data-mining tool, called Boundless Informant. A snapshot of the Boundless Informant data, contained in a top secret NSA “global heat map”, shows that in March 2013 the agency collected 97 billion pieces of intelligence from computer networks worldwide. It showed that Iran was the country where the largest amount of intelligence was gathered, with more than 14 billion reports in that period, followed by 13.5 billion from Pakistan. Jordan, one of America’s closest Arab allies, came third with 12.7 billion, followed by Egypt (7.6 billion) and India (6.3 billion).

    Another major area of concern for India has been the attempts through parliamentary approval to restrict visas to technically qualified Indians in the US. That Kerry dismissed this as a mere question of numbers gave the impression that he was just paying lip service to accommodating Indian concerns.

    If there is promise in the Indo-US relationship, it is in boosting economic links and in strategic co-operation. The strategic relationship between Japan, the US, India and Australia has for the first time rattled China somewhat. But the Chinese are tough nuts to crack. It would take quite some effort to combat Chinese efforts to control the seas routes in Asia and the Pacific.

    The visit of John Kerry was significant also for the series of military hardware deals worth billions of dollars between New Delhi and American defence corporations. India, which spent $40 billion for defence procurement in the three years up to 2011-12, has lined up capital expenditure of another $100 billion by 2021-22 to modernise its armed forces. Washington is eyeing a large share of this market.

    No U-turn for India, US - The New Indian Express
     
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  3. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

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    India has to perform, raise its people out of poverty & improve itself on HDI parameters, if it seriously expects the innate Western proclivity of India-Pak hyphenation to be done away with.
     
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  4. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    US india relations under obama have gone nowhere I don't expect anything positions very in the
    Short term.
     
  5. Neil

    Neil Senior Member Senior Member

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    why just blame the US... GOI has been in policy paralysis since ages...!!
     
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  6. dhananjay1

    dhananjay1 Regular Member

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    Only total imbeciles or folks at BBC would equate Pakistan with India. This is not 1945, when only the western nations counted when it came to power politics on the world stage. Things have changed and are changing, US would benefit if it develops good relationship with India. It's not like Americans have much goodwill left for Pakistan.
     
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  7. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    It is not all Usa's fault but first thing obama did when he became president is reject terms of us india nuclear deal.
    The thorn in the side is always pakistan there can nev really be potential for relations to blossom when Pakistan is always a factor.
    Many defense deals with india Imo were lost because of Pakistan eg MRCA.
     
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  8. Neil

    Neil Senior Member Senior Member

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    agreed LF sir.... its just that both sides are responsible for only using words with no real action on ground....
     
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  9. thakur_ritesh

    thakur_ritesh Administrator Administrator

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    No, U turn? There already is!

    And this time the fault doesn't rest with the US but squarely with India. Time after time, the UPA has made commitments, hardly any fulfilled. Relationships don't prosper like this, there are continuous gives and takes but the UPA after the Bush experience has developed a habit of free lunches.

    To add to the agony, UPA has made the economy tank which significantly reduces the utility India once possessed, and UPA's over sensitiveness to China, India has largely remained non-committal on pushing its interests jointly with the US and others is the SEA region.

    Relations don't get build in isolation, for some reason the UPA believes it does and has faltered! This relation is only headed south for now.
     
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