No Person Is Homeless in Mizoram

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by Oracle, Jul 2, 2012.

  1. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    Guwahati, Apr 17 : Mizoram, India’s most literate state next to Kerala, has no homeless people. This north-eastern state also scores a high – 93.4% – in sanitation. So says the 2011 census for housing, household amenities and assets.

    “Out of 221,077 households in our state, 65.8% live in their own houses
    and 31.8% have rented accommodation while the rest live in staff quarters,” said Mizoram chief minister Lal Thanhawla. “The census indicates we have no homeless people although 2.8% live in houses marked dilapidated,” he added.

    Most of the houses (62.3%) have been categorized ‘good’ while 34.9% are ‘liveable’.

    Landlocked Mizoram has also excelled in sanitation with 203,185 of the 221,077 families possessing latrines within the premises of their houses and 3,342 families (1.5%) using public latrines while 14,550 people (5.5%) defecate in the open.

    The more accessible, connected and touristy Meghalaya on the other hand has a disappointing 34.3% of its 538,299 households defecating in the open. On the brighter side, the households not possessing latrines marginally decreased from 48.8% in 2001 to 37.1% in 2011.

    Meghalaya’s report card on rural electrification was also dented with the percentage of those ‘not having any source of lighting increasing from 0.1% in 2001 to 0.9% in 2011. Overall, however, 60.9% of the state’s households were electrified compared to 42.7% in 2001.

    More than electricity, Manipur’s problem has been access to fuel for cooking. The militancy-mauled state, says the latest census, has 65% of its 6.09 lakh people dependent on firewood. Incredibly, 57% of them possess cell phones.

    Manipur’s mark of 65.7% household firewood users is much above the national average of 49%, the census data reveals. In contrast, only 29.7% people use cooking gas while 0.2% households use kerosene for cooking.

    “Ukhrul district has the most firewood users (93.1%) followed by Tamenglong district with 92.9% while Imphal West has the lowest percentage of 39.8,” said Manipur’s director of census operations Y Thamkishore Singh.

    Manipur, though, has fewer firewood users (72%) than Assam, where 25.8% of its 63.7 lakh households across 26,000 villages and 214 towns have no homes and kerosene is the main source of light for 61.8%. Of these households, only 54.8% have drinking water facility within their premises while 44.1% avail of banking services, up from 20.5% in 2001.

    Read more: No Person Is Homeless in Mizoram | Sinlung

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  3. aeroblogger

    aeroblogger Regular Member

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    Wow. Kudos to Mizoram...

    Any insights as to why they've been so successful at getting their people housing and sanitation compared to the rest of the country?
     
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    This could be the reason

    The fabric of social life in the Mizo society has undergone tremendous change over the last few years. Previously the village and the clan formed units of Mizo society. The Mizo code of ethics or dharma focused on "Tlawmngaihna", an untranslatable term meaning that it was the obligation of all members of society to be hospitable, kind, unselfish, and helpful to others. Tlawmngaihna to a Mizo stands for that compelling moral force which finds expression in self-sacrifice for the service of others. The old belief, Pathian, is still used to mean God. Mizos often gather together to help in disaster management like landslides or famine.

    Mizos are a close-knit society with no class distinction and no sexual discrimination. 90% of them are cultivators and the village functions as a large family. Birth, marriage, and death in the village are important occasions and the whole village would typically become involved. In time of death, the whole local community, as well as all family members of the deceased, mourn together, in the residence of the deceased. This particular process of mourning together lasts anywhere from a few weeks to over 3 months.

    There are a few community establishments in urban centres that frequently arrange various social events, musical concerts, comedy shows, reality TV shows, discussion groups, and scientific or technological conferences. However, generally speaking the region is lacking in Western-style social meeting establishments. Much of the social life often revolves around church. An active church life is perhaps one of the reasons why Mizos are such a tight-knit community.

    Wiki

    I have also experienced the same when I was there.
     
  5. aeroblogger

    aeroblogger Regular Member

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    Sounds like a fantastic place to visit... I must add Mizoram to the list of places I want to go :)
     
  6. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

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    Does having a smaller population/geographic area play a role here ?
     
  7. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    Definitely, it does. But we cannot excuse our corrupt politicians of not even trying to achieve the same.
     
  8. SREEKAR

    SREEKAR Senior Member Senior Member

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    Hmmm. Impresive article.:thumb:
     
  9. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    Limited population, more education, shunning of violence, education in public and personal hygiene, focus on development rather than petty politics.

    Try their model with any state and it will work wonders.
     
  10. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    You must.

    It is a very clean and peaceful state. The state is gifted with green hilly terrain and is one with nature. People are polite and don't meddle in your affairs.

    Plus as a tourist you will be treated well and are safe compared to Nagaland and Manipur where they look to target tourists and visitors. for easy money.
     
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  11. blueblood

    blueblood Senior Member Senior Member

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    Holy Smokes......

    I for the life of me could never have imagined such a place in India. Kudos to the people of Mizoram. :namaste:

    @Tshering22, can you list the places you think are must see for the tourists in North East. Thanks.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  12. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    I would definitely advise you to try your hand at the three four following states:

    - Sikkim
    - Meghalaya
    - Mizoram
    - Arunachal Pradesh

    These states are peaceful, clean and are tourist friendly.

    Our states' beauty stems from natural scenery, friendly people and clean cities.

    You need a special permit to visit Arunachal though, which you can obtain here:

    Inner Line Permit Management System

    Personally, I am against this sort of thing as I believe all Indians should be able to live anywhere in any part of the country, because we are all one. But sadly that's not the reality.

    Not being discriminatory to my Naga and Manipuri fellow northeasterners, but some regions here are not safe for visitors and tourists from rest of the country. And this is sadly due to the goon/terrorist rule that is going on there who do not let the state develop.

    But if you know some friend or colleague from there, then you can definitely try visiting them as they know where all to show you safely.

    I personally did not find much in Tripura that you will need to specifically go there for.

    If you are into cultural and wildlife tourism specifically, Assam is a good place with temples, and sanctuaries like Manas and Kaziranga.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
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