Nitish Kumar's visit to Pakistan

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by parijataka, Oct 17, 2012.

  1. parijataka

    parijataka Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2011
    Messages:
    4,893
    Likes Received:
    3,688
    Location:
    Bengaluru
    Nitish to lead Bihar delegation to Pakistan in Nov

     
  2.  
  3. VIP

    VIP Ultra Nationalist Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2012
    Messages:
    4,684
    Likes Received:
    3,187
    Location:
    Gandhinagar
    Muslim appeasment ?? Ya fir Pakistan ko Bihar banane chale hai ??:lol:
     
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Fortunately for him, he is a sober chap and he won't come out to be the clown of India as Laloo Yadav did when he visited Pakistan.
     
  5. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2009
    Messages:
    9,252
    Likes Received:
    3,347
    Location:
    Brussels
    Good for him. Hope he comes back in one piece.
     
  6. LurkerBaba

    LurkerBaba Staff Administrator

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    6,769
    Likes Received:
    3,678
    Location:
    India
    Why ? .........
     
  7. spikey360

    spikey360 Crusader Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2011
    Messages:
    2,285
    Likes Received:
    2,116
    Location:
    The Republic of India
    Again, votebank politics. One hopes he'll be able to fulfill his Prime Ministerial wet dream on Muslim votes.
     
  8. mayfair

    mayfair Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2010
    Messages:
    2,584
    Likes Received:
    1,760
    Location:
    India
    An illadvised, unthoughtful move under the present circumstances.

    Do remember Nitish saahab, many of those killed or maimed in 26/11 terror attacks in Mumbai and other terrorist atrocities around the country were Bihari migrants. A visit to Pakistan is spitting on the graves of the deceased and a slap on the face of their families and the survivors.
     
    parijataka likes this.
  9. parijataka

    parijataka Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2011
    Messages:
    4,893
    Likes Received:
    3,688
    Location:
    Bengaluru
    Bihari Muslims who opted to move to Pakistan in 1947 and migrated to the then E Pakistan were rejected by Bangladesh as `Pakistanis` and rejected by Pakistan continue to languish in Bangladesh. So much for Pakistani's love of Biharis
     
  10. farhan_9909

    farhan_9909 Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2012
    Messages:
    5,895
    Likes Received:
    496
    Location:
    Abbottabad,Bannu
    good
    good for both the countries
     
  11. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Many Razakkars have slipped back home - Bihar, after getting 'bambooed' by the Bangladeshis!

    These Razakaars are the worst example of Muslims in Bihar.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2012
    Galaxy and parijataka like this.
  12. Galaxy

    Galaxy Elite Member Elite Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2011
    Messages:
    7,093
    Likes Received:
    3,895
    Location:
    Delhi
    Most of these Razakaars live in 4 districts of Bihar - Kishangunj, Katihar, Araria and Purnea. In these districts, Muslim population has increased by around 20%-25% to 35%-40% in last 60 years!
     
  13. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,274
    Likes Received:
    11,283
    Location:
    BANGalore
    Will Nitish's visit give a boost to Biharis in Pakistan?

    Punjabi folk singers lined the road, performed bhangra on dhol beats to welcome then Punjab chief minister Amarinder Singh to the Pakistani side of the land of five rivers in January 2004. Amarinder was overwhelmed and described his journey to Lahore a pilgrimage, as the city "is a central pillar in the edifice of the composite Punjabi culture". His engagements in Pakistan for the next few days were imbued with deep commitment to the promotion of divided Punjab's shared heritage.

    Over eight years later, Bihar chief minister Nitish Kumar would take the same route to Pakistan for a five-day visit. Like Amarinder, he may not feel as much culturally at home elsewhere in Pakistan, but parts of its economic hub of Karachi would be an exception. The city has a sizable Bihari population that had retained its distinct identity despite being clubbed with ethnic Urdu-speakers of the Sindh province and its capital Karachi.

    Abdul Kadir Khanzada, who represents Orangi Town in Pakistan's parliament, said he would like to welcome Nitish to his constituency, where a majority of over a million people have their roots in Bihar. "Though my family came from Alwar in Rajputana (Rajasthan) but 70% of my voters are those with roots in Bihar, who would relate to the chief minister's visit," he told TOI from Karachi, which the CM would visit as part of his itinerary.

    He said his party had always supported peace process with India and hoped Nitish's visit would boost the ties. "I would speak to my leader in parliament, Farooq Sattar, and see whether we could invite Nitish Kumar to connect with people who have roots in his state."

    Biharis have enriched Karachi's cosmopolitan culture and their imprint on the city is perhaps best reflected in making famed Bihari kebabs an integral part of its culinary attractions.

    The place where the early immigrants from Bihar settled after the Partition is still known as Bihar colony in Karachi's Layari Town. Mostly well-off immigrants managed to reach Karachi, then Pakistani capital, following riots in Bihar in the run up to the partition and the rest of about three million found it easier to crossover to then East Pakistan - Bangladesh. Around 163,000 of them were repatriated to Pakistan in 70s and 80s after Bangladesh's liberation as they were accused of being collaborators, targeted and faced linguistic discrimination.

    Most repatriated Biharis were settled in Orangi Town. Nearly 800,000 Biharis had declared themselves as Pakistanis after the 71 liberation and most had sought to settle in Pakistan.

    The repatriation of Biharis to Pakistan was stopped in the 80s after bloody ethnic riots over it that further tilted the politico-ethnic balance in favour of Karachi's dominant Urdu-speaking people and Mutthida Quami Movement, the country's third largest party representing them.

    The process started briefly in the 1990s when 321 Biharis were brought to Pakistan on the condition that they would settle in Punjab. A Bihari colony was set up for them 370-km from Islamabad at Mian Channu in Punjab's Khanewal district. Successive Pakistani governments have since gone back on their promise to bring back an estimated 300,000 million Biharis, also known as stranded Pakistanis, who live in 66 camps without citizenship rights in Bangladesh.

    A recent report in a Gulf paper highlighted the miserable condition of Mian Channu's Pakistani Biharis, who along with their brethren in Bangladesh represent the horrors of the double partition that they faced while other communities uprooted in the aftermath of the 1947 division have prospered and moved on.

    The report cited the plight of 60-year-old Manzar Husain, who arrived in Mian Channu in 1993, leaving behind his 6-year-old daughter, now a mother of three. He expected her to be on the next flight to Pakistan, but that was not to be and has not since seen her. Further repatriation was halted and Husain has lost all hopes of seeing his daughter and grandchildren.

    The National reported that Mian Channu's Bihari colony is now a slum and Punjabis now occupy most of the two-room apartments constructed for Biharis.

    But Kamran Asdar Ali, a US-based Pakistani academic whose parents had migrated from Bihar, argued that the community is very diverse in Pakistan. "... Biharis in Pakistan are in all walks of life, from the most wealthy and influential to the most- lowly urban poor, much like in India. Biharis are in the Indian Civil service or are getting admission to St Stephens College, but then there are the rickshaw drivers in Kolkata and the migrant labour in Mumbai. Same in Pakistan."

    Scholar and anti-colonial activist Eqbal Ahmad, who was born in Bihar's Sasaram, was among the prominent Pakistani-Biharis, who earned international acclaim.

    Ali said Biharis have been given a "politically available identity of being Mohajir", which, he added, "by all means is a constructed ethnicity — a family that migrated from Madras or Bombay is also Mohajir and those who migrated from Bihar or UP are also Mohajirs".

    But Bihari Quami Movement was formed a few years earlier in Karachi, which is perhaps indicative of the community's attempt to assert its separate identity.

    The academic said most Pakistani-Biharis may not know about Nitish, his visit and what he has done in Bihar. "But his coming to Pakistan may change that."

    It could also reinforce another shared heritage in the public consciousness of India and Pakistan having more in common than what divides them to further cement the bilateral engagement that now seems to be looking up again.

    Will Nitish's visit give a boost to Biharis in Pakistan? - The Times of India
     
  14. Drsomnath999

    Drsomnath999 lord of 32 teeth Elite Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2011
    Messages:
    1,223
    Likes Received:
    1,220
    Location:
    BHUBANESHWAR
    Re: Will Nitish's visit give a boost to Biharis in Pakistan?

    i wonder earliaer lalu prasad yadav had visited pakistan & had won considerable applause from pakistan ,meanwhile our L.K adavani what he did in pakistan was a

    FACEPALM for us:lol:

    [​IMG]
     
    uvbar likes this.
  15. Das ka das

    Das ka das Tihar Jail Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    Messages:
    896
    Likes Received:
    447
    Location:
    Redneckistan
    Re: Will Nitish's visit give a boost to Biharis in Pakistan?

    This will reinforce Nitish's secular credentials..:der:
     
  16. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2010
    Messages:
    2,455
    Likes Received:
    898
    Location:
    visakhapatnam
    Re: Will Nitish's visit give a boost to Biharis in Pakistan?

    biharis in pakistan?
    they are no more biharis.his feats are just to win muslim vote bank probably
     
    parijataka and lcatejas like this.
  17. LurkerBaba

    LurkerBaba Staff Administrator

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2010
    Messages:
    6,769
    Likes Received:
    3,678
    Location:
    India
    Nitish “touched” by Pak hospitality

    Disappointing :tsk:

    Making his first visit to Pakistan, Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar on Saturday said he was captivated by the warmth of brotherhood and goodwill here as he shared his experiences in realising his quest for ensuring an all-round development in his state.

    “Pakistan and India have common history and heritage. Our bilateral relations are witnessing an all-round progress. We take pride in shared history that goes back to time immemorial,” Mr Kumar said at a luncheon hosted by Sindh Chief Minister Syed Qaim Ali Shah.

    “I feel happy to be in Pakistan. I bring good wishes and greetings for people of Pakistan,” said the Chief Minister, who arrived here yesterday on a week-long visit to Pakistan.

    He said he was “deeply touched” by the hospitality extended to him on his first visit to Pakistan. “I have been captivated by the warmth of brotherhood and goodwill.”

    The Hindu : News / National : Nitish “touched” by Pak hospitality
     
  18. Bangalorean

    Bangalorean Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    6,207
    Likes Received:
    6,497
    ^^ First of all, we need to get this shit out of our discourse about "common history and heritage, shared history that goes back to time immemorial", and all that crap. Pakistan is an artificial state, which is an aberration in history. The sooner all Indians realize this and stop being politically correct, the better.
     
    parijataka and mikhail like this.
  19. blank_quest

    blank_quest Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2012
    Messages:
    2,128
    Likes Received:
    927
    We have only "common History of Wars" and that too after 1947 partition before that we had only one History and that is of India. Don't know how uneducated people come into journalism. Yesterday I read a news that said "Indio-Pak continent". What the ---- is that? like that it should be 'Indo-Pak-Nepali-Bangla-Afghan Sub-Continent". -----ing morons. Uneducated fools. :tsk:
     
  20. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2009
    Messages:
    11,613
    Likes Received:
    5,670
    I feel happy to be in Pakistan: Nitish Kumar

    I feel happy to be in Pakistan: Nitish Kumar

    Making his first visit to Pakistan, Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar on Saturday said he was captivated by the warmth of brotherhood and goodwill, as he shared his experiences in realising his quest for ensuring an all-round development in his state.


    "Pakistan and India have common history and heritage. Our bilateral relations are witnessing an all-round progress. We take pride in shared history that goes back to time immemorial," Kumar said at a luncheon hosted by Sindh Chief Minister Syed Qaim Ali Shah.

    "I feel happy to be in Pakistan. I bring good wishes and greetings for the people of Pakistan," said the chief minister, who arrived on Friday on a week-long visit to Pakistan.

    He said he was "deeply touched" by the hospitality extended to him on his first visit to Pakistan. "I have been captivated by the warmth of brotherhood and goodwill," he said.

    Sharing his experiences, Kumar, who became Bihar's chief minister in 2005, said that "seven years ago we started our quest for establishing governance and ensuring an all round development," which was both "a challenge and an opportunity".

    "With our resolve for growth with justice, manifold achievements have been marked across sectors like governance, law and order, human resource development, infrastructure and agriculture," he said.

    Kumar said there is strict control over organised crime resulting in overall dip in the crime graph in the state.

    "Improved law and order has paved the way for restoring the authority of the state. No communal riots or social discord has been witnessed in the last seven years," he said.

    "With communal amity and social harmony came development. Bihar achieved compound annual growth rate of 11 per cent over a period of last 5 years and aims at 13 per cent rate of growth for the 12th Plan. Growth rate for 2011-12 counts at
    16.7 per cent, which is highest in the country," he said.

    Kumar also spoke of the state government's focus on sectors like education, health, women empowerment, agriculture, road infrastructure and poverty alleviation.

    He said that an atmosphere of peace and security has been ensured for minorities in Bihar during the last seven years.

    Multifarious schemes and programmes have been launched for socio-economic development of minorities with special emphasis on their educational development, the chief minister said.

    "Good governance is the mantra of our growth story," Kumar said, adding his state has a zero tolerance policy against corruption.

    Earlier, Kumar visited the mausoleum of Mohammad Ali Jinnah to pay homage to the founder of Pakistan.

    Accompanied by the Sindh chief minister, he laid floral wreaths at the mazar and the two leaders stressed the need for peace and brotherhood between the two countries.

    "I believe that Pakistan and India need to work together and exist peacefully with each other. This will not only guarantee prosperity and development for both countries but also for the entire region," Kumar told reporters outside the mazar.

    Kumar also visited Karachi's famous Mohata Palace, built in the tradition of stone palaces of Rajasthan.

    The visit to Mohata Palace "has reinforced my belief that the cultural links between our two nations are abiding which is central to our history. If we shared a common past, it is wise to share a common future regardless of geographical boundaries," he wrote in the visitors' book.

    The chief minister will also be visiting Lahore and Islamabad during his Pakistan tour.

    I feel happy to be in Pakistan: Nitish Kumar - Rediff.com India News

    =================

    Nitish Kumar should be aware of his protection detail given to him in Pakistan especially during lunch and dinner time because they are known to abandon the protection duty for lunch and dinner :pound:
     
  21. drkrn

    drkrn Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2010
    Messages:
    2,455
    Likes Received:
    898
    Location:
    visakhapatnam
    Re: I feel happy to be in Pakistan: Nitish Kumar

    stay there pls don't come back.you can be given nishan-e- pakistan :taunt1:
     
    jackprince and spikey360 like this.

Share This Page