Nepal : China cuts down India's Influence

Discussion in 'Subcontinent & Central Asia' started by Singh, Apr 23, 2009.

  1. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,270
    Location:
    011
    India calls back envoy to Nepal for emergency briefing


    Kathmandu, April 23 (IANS) New Delhi has called back its ambassador to Nepal Rakesh Sood for an emergency briefing Thursday after the drama over the potential sacking of Nepal’s army chief by the Maoist-led government spilled over onto the streets with the former guerrillas making public threats of capturing the army headquarters.

    Sood cancelled his appointment with the Nepali Minister for Water Resources Bishnu Poudel, whom he was to have handed over Indian assistance worth over Rs.100 million, at the last minute Thursday to catch an afternoon flight to New Delhi.

    Before he left, the ambassador, along with seven other foreign envoys, who together form Nepal’s biggest bloc of donors, met Maoist Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal Prachanda to express their collective concern over the growing dissent in Nepal’s major political parties and the effect it would have on the ongoing peace process.

    Besides India, the ambassadors of Britain, US, China, Japan, Finland, Norway and Germany formed Thursday’s diplomatic corps meeting Prachanda.

    Prachanda’s media advisor Om Sharma told IANS that India was urging the major parties to work together and had reiterated support for the peace process.

    The PM, Sharma said, had assured the ambassadorial delegation that the Maoist party was committed to democracy, human rights, the freedom of the press and an independent judiciary.

    Defending the Maoists’ attempt to fire army chief Gen Rookmangud Katawal just four months before he is due to retire, Prachanda said it was done to strengthen democracy and ascertain civil supremacy over the military.

    The Maoist supremo, whose government had earlier sought to retire eight brigadier-generals, denied that his party was trying to capture power by bringing the army under its control.

    Thursday’s meeting makes it the third one in less than a week that Sood met Prachanda after the furore erupted.

    On Wednesday, the top Maoist leaders, who had earlier been urging the government to dismiss the army chief, asked it to go slow, attributing the decision to “pressure by India and the US”.

    Subsequently, the cabinet, which was to have decided beleaguered Katawal’s fate, decided to put off its verdict.

    The chief of the UN agency that is involved in the peace process also met Prachanda Thursday, indicating the mounting world concern at the new developments in the Himalayan republic.

    Karin Landgren, chief of the UN Mission in Nepal that has been supervising the arms and combatants of the Maoist army since the guerrillas signed a peace pact in 2006, reportedly asked about the proposed merger of the guerrilla People’s Liberation Army with the Nepal Army, which is a key step in the peace process.

    Though Prachanda has publicly pledged the thorny task will be completed by July 15, the fresh spat with the army raises new doubts about his promise.

    Despite their repeated promise to the UN to discharge all child soldiers and other disqualified PLA combatants, the Maoists are yet to do so.

    India calls back envoy to Nepal for emergency briefing
     
  2.  
  3. Singh

    Singh Phat Cat Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    20,305
    Likes Received:
    8,270
    Location:
    011
    Nepal Army chief issue snowballs

    Kathmandu: The Maoist-led government is again caught up in a controversy. And this time, the rift between the Defence Ministry headed by a Maoist Minister and Chief of Nepal Army, appointed during monarchy, is exposed wide and clear.

    The government’s move to seek clarification from the Chief of the Army Staff, General Rookmangud Katawal, who is retiring in three months, has not just concerned parties of the Constituent Assembly but also the international community.

    Seventeen political parties have already concluded that the move to oust General Katawal by seeking a clarification is unjustified. The Nepali Congress has maintained that it will continue to obstruct the House proceedings until the government withdrew its move. Ambassadors of India, United States and six other countries have told Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal (Prachanda) that the issue should be resolved through consensus to respect civil supremacy. President Ram Baran Yadav, who is the Supreme Commander in Chief of the Nepal Army, has told Mr. Prachanda the same.

    Meanwhile, some Maoist leaders claim that it is due to “foreign intervention” that the clarification issue got hyped up. Ambassador Rakesh Sood, who met Mr. Prachanda twice to discuss the Army Chief’s issue, suddenly left for India on Thursday. .

    Though the government was supposed to take a decision on the day General Katawal submitted clarification, a Cabinet meeting felt that the clarification should be studied first by all the Ministers before taking a decision. As per the laws of Nepal Army, the government can suspend the Army Chief but for this a clarification should be sought from him. In his clarification, the General has said the government “cannot dismiss” him using the Army Act.

    The Hindu : International : Nepal Army chief issue snowballs
     
  4. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    Nepal Army General is fired by the Nepalese PM

    BBC reports that Nepalese Army General is fired by the Nepalese Prime Minister .

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8031302.stm



    Nepalese army general fired by PM
    A Nepalese soldier during fighting with Maoists rebels in 2005
    The Nepalese army fought Maoists rebels for more than a decade

    Nepal's army chief has been fired by the ruling Maoists in a row about the integration of their former fighters into the armed forces.

    General Rookmangud Katawal was forced out during a special Cabinet meeting, the information minister said.

    He was accused of defying government orders to stop hiring new recruits and to get rid of eight generals.

    The government wants to integrate former Maoist rebel fighters into the army - a move opposed by generals.

    Correspondents say the row could undermine the peace process which ended the civil war in 2006.

    The Maoists fought the army for more than a decade before giving up their armed revolt, and the relationship between the two sides has been tense since the former rebels came into power last year.

    Thirteen-thousand people died in the conflict.

    Information and Communications Minister Krishna Bahadur Mahara said Gen Katawal was fired because "he failed to give satisfactory explanation on why the government orders were ignored".

    The Maoists accused Gen Katawal of hiring 2,800 new recruits and reinstating the generals, dismissed by the defence ministry, without consulting the government, Reuters said.

    The army chief has been refusing to integrate former Maoist fighters that he views as politically indoctrinated.

    In March, the Nepalese Supreme Court ordered the defence ministry to put on hold its decision to retire the eight generals from the army.

    Cabinet walk-out

    Several representatives walked out of the Cabinet meeting in protest, but a vote went ahead.

    "We have been insisting that the decision on the army chief should be taken through consensus among all political parties but the prime minister decided to ignore us," said Deputy Prime Minister Bamdev Gautam, according to Associated Press news agency.

    Gen Katawal was due to retire in four months.

    The army's second-in-command, Kul Bahadur Khadka, has been appointed acting army chief, the deputy PM said.

    Asked in a BBC interview last year about suspicions that Gen Katawal would be sacked, Prime Minister Prachanda said: "That will not happen.

    "As long as everyone including the army, the police and the other officials remain committed to the people's mandate on democracy, peace and change, no-one needs to feel insecure."
     
  5. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    Another report of ZEE News, about Nepalese Army planning coup against the Govt.

    http://www.zeenews.com/South-Asia/2009-04-24/526405news.html



    Home » South Asia
    Army
    planned coup in Nepal: Report

    Kathmandu, April 24: Amid a stand off between the ruling Maoists and the Nepal Army, a media report on Friday said the military had contemplated a coup against the unstable Prachanda-led government, a charge denied by the Army.

    The Kathmandu Post today reported that the military was contemplating a “soft coup” against the eight-month-old coalition government in response to the move to sack Army Chief General Rukmangad Katawal on allegations that he had disobeyed the government’s order.

    The Army denied the report, saying such reports were baseless, fabricated and part of conspiracy to create rift between the Army and the government.

    The news story, citing senior Army officials, reported that some 25 Generals held a secret consultation after the Prime Minister sought clarification from Katawal last week.

    The report, headlined 'What put Maoists on backfoot', quoted army sources as saying that General Katawal came close to staging a "soft coup" against Lt Gen KB Khadka, who was the Maoists’ choice to replace the present chief.

    As per the coup plan, ex-King would be put in Nagarjun forest lodge in "line arrest", Prime Minister Prachanda, Nepali Congress President GP Koirala and a number of other leaders would be cut off from the public and Singhdurbar Secretariat, premier's residence Baluwatar, Ministers’ quarters and Maoist offices would be put under siege.

    Bureau Report
     
  6. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    BBC reports that communist UML party quit the Govt. in protest of sacking of Nepal Army Chief.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8031622.stm



    Nepal communists quit in protest
    An anti-government protester in Kathmandu after the PM sacked the army chief
    Anti-government protests were staged after the general's sacking

    A key ally of Nepal's Maoist-led government has withdrawn from the governing coalition in protest at the dismissal of the army chief.

    The Communist UML party withdrew after Gen Rookmangud Katawal was sacked for defying government orders to integrate former rebel fighters into the army.

    He was sacked during a special cabinet meeting which saw other parties protest by walking out.

    The withdrawal leaves the Maoists with only a slender parliamentary majority.

    Correspondents say the row could undermine the peace process which ended the civil war in 2006.

    Communist UML general secretary Ishwar Pokharel said: "The party has decided to leave the coalition and withdraw support to the Maoists."

    The government wants to integrate former Maoist rebel fighters into the army, and accused Gen Katawal of defying government orders to stop hiring new recruits and to get rid of eight generals.

    The army chief has been refusing to integrate former Maoist fighters that he views as politically indoctrinated.

    The Maoists fought the army for more than a decade before giving up their armed revolt, and the relationship between the two sides has been tense since the former rebels came into power last year.

    Thirteen-thousand people died in the conflict.

    A Nepalese soldier during fighting with Maoists rebels in 2005
    The Nepalese army fought Maoists rebels for more than a decade

    In March, the Nepalese Supreme Court ordered the defence ministry to put on hold its decision to retire the eight generals from the army.

    Several coalition representatives walked out of the cabinet meeting in protest at the proposed sacking, but a vote went ahead.

    "We have been insisting that the decision on the army chief should be taken through consensus among all political parties but the prime minister decided to ignore us," said Deputy Prime Minister Bamdev Gautam, according to the Associated Press news agency.

    Gen Katawal was due to retire in four months.

    The army's second-in-command, Kul Bahadur Khadka, has been appointed acting army chief, the deputy PM said.
     
  7. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    Another reports from The Times of India on the same.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...le-against-army-chief/articleshow/4479105.cms

    Maoists win hara-kiri battle against army chief
    3 May 2009, 1820 hrs IST, TNN


    KATHMANDU: Fourteen years after Nepal’s army
    saw its first chief resign over corruption charges, a second chief was sacked on Sunday by the
    ruling Maoist party who won their battle but could be losing the war with diplomatic ties waning and its own coalition partners threatening to quit.

    Gen Rookmangud Katawal, a graduate of the Indian National Defence Academy and the Indian Military Academy, was appointed head of the army during the turbulent days of 2006 after King Gyanendra’s military-backed government fell. A commoner who broke the tradition of the aristocracy occupying the position of the army chief, the general however had a stormy tenure after he refused to fall in with the Maoist plan to induct their guerrilla fighters en masse into the army.

    The animosity came to a head this year after Katawal turned a deaf ear to the government’s orders to halt military recruitment and reinstated eight brigadier-generals retired by the defence ministry. The last straw came after the army decided to boycott the 5th National Games to protest against the Maoist fighters’ participation.

    “The cabinet (today) decided to retire the army chief since he could not provide satisfactory explanations,” Maoist Information and Communications Minister Krishna Bahadur Mahara said. “The cabinet has also decided to appoint Lt-Gen Kul Bahadur Khadka as the acting army chief.”

    The decision came after increasing pressure by the hawks in the Maoist party who accused Katawal of going against “people’s sovereignty” and being supported by “foreign powers”, especially India.

    However, it could be a pyrrhic victory with the Maoists’ four coalition partners – the Communist Party of Nepal-Unified Marxist Leninist (UML), Madhesi Janadhikar Forum, Sadbhavana Party and Communist Party of Nepal (United) – distancing themselves from the decision and saying they had asked for consensus.

    Within hours, the UML, the third largest party in parliament, had called an emergency meeting of its standing committee and decided to withdraw from the government. Though the Maoists, suspecting a UML desertion, began seeking the support of the minor parties, most of the parliamentary parties have united under the opposition, former prime minister Girija Prasad Koirala’s Nepali Congress (NC), and asked President Ram Baran Yadav, the constitutional head of government, to reject the cabinet order.

    Yadav himself has also come down strongly on the Maoist move, saying it was “against the constitution, law and consensus”. Nepal’s interim parliament decrees that any decision regarding the army has to be endorsed by not just the ruling parties but 20 other parliamentary parties as well. It is likely that the president will send the cabinet order to the interim parliament, where it would be put to vote and in all probability, be defeated.

    While the fate of Nepal’s first Maoist government lies in jeopardy, there is the fear of renewed violence with the former guerrillas amassing thousands of cadres in Kathmandu to keep up a show of strength. With the NC also bringing out rallies condemning the general’s dismissal, the two sides clashed in several parts of the capital, resurrecting the turbulence Nepal had undergone during the royal regime.

    India could have the last laugh. Once the mentor who brought the Maoists and the main parties together, it became the former rebels’ arch enemy since they joined the government. Now, New Delhi could once again have a key role to play as mediator and defuse the new crisis.
     
  8. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2009
    Messages:
    12,076
    Likes Received:
    327
    The Associated Press reports that there are protest in Nepal

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5hiHvC24FAgeyAbnlhPRmgerpiBfwD97URDFG0

    Protests erupt after Nepal PM fires army chief

    By BINAJ GURUBACHARYA – 1 hour ago

    KATMANDU, Nepal (AP) — Nepal's prime minister fired the army chief on Sunday after accusing him of defying government orders, prompting a key party to quit the coalition government and plunging the Himalayan country into a political crisis that could endanger its peace process.

    Tens of thousands of people poured into the streets of the capital to demonstrate both for and against the decision by Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal, a former Maoist rebel leader.

    Tensions have risen for months as Dahal's ruling Maoists have struggled with the army over its refusal to integrate former rebel units into its ranks as required by a U.N.-brokered peace agreement. The dismissal of army chief Rookmangud Katawal on Sunday is likely to further enflame those tensions and could unravel the coalition government.

    The second-largest party in the coalition, the Communist Party of Nepal (United Marxist Leninist), said it was quitting the government because Dahal had not obtained the coalition partners' approval before sacking Katawal.

    "We decided to withdraw our support to protest the prime minister's unilateral decision," party general secretary Ishwar Pokhrel said. The Communist Party has traditionally been part of the political mainstream, while the Maoists until 2006 were a rebel group fighting government troops.

    Other parties in the coalition were still deciding whether to remain in the government. Most, however, walked out of the Cabinet meeting Sunday at which the prime minister announced the dismissal.

    The main opposition party, Nepali Congress, condemned the sacking and organized street protests.

    Police were put on high alert as flag-waving, tire-burning demonstrators took to the streets of the capital. There were no immediate reports of clashes.

    "We will protest the government decision both on the streets and in parliament," said Prakash Sharan Mahat, a Nepali Congress lawmaker.

    Thousands of Maoist supporters thronged other parts of Katmandu, waving their signature red flags. They called the army chief's sacking a "victory for people's rule."

    Home Ministry spokesman Navin Ghimire said the police were put on high alert to prevent any trouble.

    Dahal has accused Katawal of ignoring government orders by refusing to stop recruiting soldiers and allowing eight senior army generals whose tenures were not extended by the government to continue working.

    Information Minister Krishna Bahadur Mahara said the army chief "failed to give a satisfactory explanation on why the government orders were ignored."

    The army's second-in-command, Kul Bahadur Khadka, has been appointed acting army chief, he said.

    It was unclear whether Dahal has the legal authority to fire the military chief.

    The army — which was controlled by Nepal's king before the monarchy was abolished last year at the Maoists' behest — is officially under the command of the president, who is a member of the Nepali Congress party.

    But legal procedures for removing the head of the army are unclear because Nepal's constitution is still being rewritten.

    The Maoists gave up their 10-year armed rebellion in 2006 and joined a peace process. They confined their fighters in U.N.-monitored camps and locked up their weapons. They joined elections last year and emerged as Nepal's largest political party.

    Disagreements between the Maoists and other parties have triggered several crises which delayed formation of the lawmaking Constituent Assembly and the writing of a new constitution.
     
  9. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Good that the Nepal Army Chief is exerting himself.

    Can't have a pro China regime up north or a naxal govt that run to our Andhra Pradesh through what is known as the "Red Corridor" or in other words, a Naxal Corridor.
     
  10. shiv

    shiv Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2009
    Messages:
    326
    Likes Received:
    5
    yes i think the situation is going in india's favor,if we continue to let the maoist government get strong then they will also start backing the insurgents and maoists in our territory
     
  11. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,274
    Likes Received:
    11,283
    Location:
    BANGalore
    Nepal PM Prachanda resigns

    Nepal Prime Minister Pushpa Kamla Dahal Prachanda has resigned following a major row over the sacking of the army chief on Sunday. Prachanda, Nepal's PM Prachanda announces his resignation during a nationwide broadcast in Kathmandu.

    Nepal's first Maoist prime minister, announced his resignation in a televised address to the nation, blaming Nepal's political parties and foreign powers for hindering his government.

    On Sunday, Prachanda had sacked army chief General Katawal accusing him of defying the government's orders by reinstating eight Generals retired by the Maoist administration, the president told the army chief to remain in the post.

    The crisis follows months of tussle between the prime minister and the army chief over the induction of former Maoist rebels into the army.

    A nearly two-month battle between the Maoists and army chief Gen Rookmangud Katawal had come to a head Sunday with the ruling party announcing the dismissal of Katawal.

    But the announcement triggered widespread protests with two of the government's own partners, the Communist Party of Nepal-Unified Marxist Leninist (UML) and Sadbhavana Party deciding to quit.

    A second blow came from President Ram Baran Yadav who in a late Sunday night order to the beleaguered army chief asked him to continue with his job.

    Yadav, who is the constitutional head of the government as well as the supreme commander of the Nepal Army, called the dismissal order "unconstitutional, illegal and without consensus".
     
  12. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,274
    Likes Received:
    11,283
    Location:
    BANGalore
    Will this mean that Nepal will get back to the days of Maoist insurgency? They have no reason as the main aim of the insurgency was its opposition to the Royalty. Dont think Prachanda will find any support now if he wants to go back to taking up arms.
     
  13. shiv

    shiv Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2009
    Messages:
    326
    Likes Received:
    5
    what will be the implications now??will the king be reinstated??
     
  14. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,274
    Likes Received:
    11,283
    Location:
    BANGalore
    Kings gone for good. The King wasnt removed because the Maoists won. He was because he was not popular and the people did not want the royalty.
    With the royals gone, the Maoists did not have any reason to continue with its insurgency and thought it was wise to form a government instead.
    Prachanda has been used to ordering and when his orders were not obeyed he got petrified. But in the view of intense pressure from India and also seeing that the Armed forces were with the sacked General, he had to back off.

    Its good for India that he is gone as he had been eying China to counter Indian influence. Its good that the Nepalese army chief is Indian trained and expect him to be favorable towards India.
    India now has to ensure a favorable government over there.
     
  15. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    7,541
    Likes Received:
    1,260
    Location:
    Bangalore
    Blame game started and see the bluff:

    Nepal govt blames India for debacle - South Asia - World - The Times of India
     
  16. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,274
    Likes Received:
    11,283
    Location:
    BANGalore
    Its not blame game. The Maoists were always anti India and India was always wary of them. Its good that they have gone as they definitely had a tilt towards the Chinese. Infact Pranchanda was scheduled to travel to China to sign a treaty of friendship (read screw India).
     
  17. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    5,410
    Likes Received:
    971
    Baburam Bhattarai, the Maoist finance minister, has indicated that his party will "begin a struggle from the streets and from the floor of the Interim House" to reinstate the sacked army chief Gen Rookmangud Katawal. On the other hand, the Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal Prachanda, also Maoist, continues to accuse the opposition, some among his own allies, and New Delhi's "bureaucrats" of engineering his downfall. This seems to be brewing into a protracted war- not just between the Maoists on the one hand and the opposition Nepali Congress and the Army on the other, but between Maoist coteries themselves!


    Infact, and this struck me as another dismal lack of foresight on the part of our foreign policy, India coalesced the Maoists, then underground, and mainstream political parties in 2006 into a pro-democracy movement in direct opposition to Gyanendra's increasingly unpopular regime. The Government felt that with King Gyanendra's support increasingly waning, the continued extension of patronage to a weak, unpopular government unstable and on the verge of collapse would be political suicide. Much to our chagrin however, the Maoists swept to victory in the 'democratic election' in 2008. I think the more pertinent question to ask is, whether beyond all this rhetoric, the Indian government is pursuing a policy of redressal of its astigmatic support to a party, that in the words of Yusuf is clearly 'pro-red', and has therefore engineered its collapse. There have been reports of intense lobbying in recent days on the part of foreign minister Shiv Shankar Memon on behalf of the Army Chief Katwal. The fact that the end result is a collapse of the Communist-Maoist combine, which works to our advantage, is testament to the still 'many levers' India can pull to get its way in Nepal.


    No he won't. The people of Nepal have already demonstrated their support through an election- and this after being exhausted and fatigued from years of violence in the Communist-wracked country. Furthermore, if Prachanda takes up arms for a 'struggle', it will be, this time around, issue-based and the people will know it- since the impending sacking of the Army Chief over refusing to incorporate Maoist cadres into the regular Army dominated Nepal's politics in recent months and was imminent. So any 'struggle' will not be for the cause of 'the people', but for Prachanda's personal political ends and for those of his party. Not just that, the Maoist party of Nepal has been infiltrated by Indian observers and India-leaning bureaucrats since becoming a mainstream political party in 2008, and it is feasible that India will prevail over the party if recourse to arms is imminent. This time however, we have to ensure we support the right faction and leverage the situation to our advantage.
     
  18. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    5,410
    Likes Received:
    971
    Take a look at this boys: Indrani Bagchi spreading her tripe and half-baked knowledge through her imbecilic views about 'political ethics' and the 'impropriety of India's gauche and tactless meddling' in 'Nepal's internal affairs'. Perhaps someone would care to tell her about the indisputable threat the Maoists pose to us through their ideological confederates across the border? One wonders whether her 'consciousness' over India's meddling' would be similarly evoked when it is apparent to her that an even bigger and more contentious neighbour seeks to use the 'democratically elected Maoist government' as pawns- to our detriment. I am truly glad that the 'belligerent bureaucrats' whom she fulminates against are where they are and she is where she is. Coffee anyone?


    South Block screwed up BIG

    [​IMG]


    Indrani Bagchi - Sunday April 26, 2009


    India needs to wake up and smell the coffee in Nepal. Last week, India exhibited some truly clumsy diplomacy in Kathmandu, which was astounding for the fact that it showed India as the nasty big brother that Nepalis often accuse India of.

    “Prachanda” Pushpa Dahal’ s showcause notice to the army chief, Rukmangad Katawal, was high-handed, dictatorial and rightly attracted the ire of the other political parties. But to see the Indian ambassador hot-footing it to Baluwatar, pleading with Prachanda to desist, showed the kind of desperation that has completely laid India bare in Nepal.

    Even given fears that the Nepalese Army may have been considering a “coup” may have been uppermost on his mind, surely diplomacy throws up better ways of doing things. If the US, or any other country had done this to India, South Block would be up in flames.

    Its been clear for a while that Prachanda wanted to throw out Katawal and install the Maoist-friendly Kul Bahadur Khadka in his place. Its also been clear that Katawal has been resisting efforts to integrate the PLA cadres into the army. That may be something the Indian army can screw up its nose at, but that should be the Nepalis’ business.

    Prachanda, as elected PM is fully within his rights to question the army chief, because no matter what, the army has to serve the popular government of the day. How did South Block forget this mantra?

    Katawal is no great lover of the Maoist government, and has been known to be very close to the deposed king Gyanendra, having been adopted by his father King Mahendra.

    But for democratic India to intervene on behalf of an army chief in Nepal is to send out absolutely the wrong signals. Its blatant intereference in the internal affairs of another country, for one. Second, it shows that India would rather support the army than a popularly elected government, even if you don’t like the colour of their stripes.

    Nepalese media have published detailed records of how foreign secretary Shiv Shankar Menon tried to persuade the UML chief touring China that he should stop the sacking. Now that was really clever.

    Katawal is now “burnt toast” as someone said, ruefully. Because no matter what India says, or perhaps because of it, Prachanda will get rid of him. Then he will resume his now interrupted visit to China and sign that treaty of peace and friendship that South Block was so against.

    When elections were held in April 2008, it was a fair and participatory process that threw up the ruling combine in Kathmandu which had few outstanding debts to India, like the older political parties, army or even discredited royalty, the traditional pillars of Nepal.

    India has known, since then, that things could never be as good as they had been, when India ordered and Nepalese followed. The Maoists are not India-friendly, and South Block is not Maoist-friendly. The Maoists want to spread their risks by getting China into the game as well. No surprises here, and India should have been mature enough to deal with this particular challenge.

    India is partly responsible for Nepal running to the arms of the Chinese - that’s now very clear. India has many levers to ensure that its interests are addressed in Nepal, if only India chooses to utilize them. But beyond that, India needs to cut Nepal some slack. Let them go, guys. Cut those apron strings.


    South Block screwed up BIG : Globespotting : Indrani Bagchi - Times Of India Blog
     
  19. Vinod2070

    Vinod2070 मध्यस्थ Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2009
    Messages:
    2,553
    Likes Received:
    100
    I don't think it will get any worse. Prachanda was as bad for India as it gets.

    There has always been some kind of anti-India feeling in all our neighbors. Most of them suffer from the small country syndrome. Some have other reasons as well.

    Of course India has not played it's cards right too. We need to prevent them from ganging up against us.
     
  20. thakur_ritesh

    thakur_ritesh Administrator Administrator

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    4,434
    Likes Received:
    1,719
    Location:
    Land of the GODS - "Dev Bhomi".
    interesting times ahead, well it never ceases to be like that with a neighborhood like we have, right from burma to bangladesh to nepal to sri lanka to pakistan to afghanistan, wow what a surrounding.


    maoists are learning the lessons of democracy the hard way and one lesson learnt for sure must be that they can not have a free will like the way they used to have in the jungles of nepal. maoists understand well that till the time they do not have complete control on the national army till then they can never have complete control on their country and what better way of doing this than having an army which is ideologically inclined to their ideology. the way of doing this is two fold, one is to have an army chief and his subordinates sympathetic to their cause and the other to have the former maoists gorillas join the armed forces which could effectively mean transforming the once royal army of nepal to PLA. once they have this process complete i suspect they will go in for one party system with complete backing from the prc which would effectively mean dictatorship china style in nepal and with this nepal like pakistan would be completely in the lap of prc. this is where the confrontation happened as this is something that is not supported by any of the opposition parties and by the present general and his subordinates who all got fired, who all have had good relations with india and are very wary of getting into the fold of prc. reasons are easy to see, opposition if allows this would mean they go to wilderness and the generals who have had their education, training in india and with the indian army have strong bonding with us and wont let go that important relationship. nepal stands at cross roads, one road leads to india which they have taken all this while, the other leads to prc which the maoists want to take but which india will not allow them to take or what has just happened is just a trailer of what could happen if they try their luck too far and it could get much more nasty.


    the politics got played well, india played the mediator when the now opposition parties got dismissed by the king and brought about the 7 party coalition and then became a mediator between them and the maoists and the king and earned the much needed good will of the nepali people at large an image which till then had taken a beating. the result post the elections were such that maoists were made to lead a very unstable government. people got to taste of their governance and it seems they have lost some base as their carders continued with their violent ways something that has not gone down too well with the people there. maoists seem to have played into the hands of indians so far or so it seems and this could leave a weakened maoists with lesser support. maoists and the prc know well that they can not have a free will till the time india is able to have its way in that country and may be next time when they form the government they could come up with a lot of surprises for us and so it gets important that for the time being either there is no govt formation in nepal and the country remains under the president's rule or a government gets formed there which has no footprints of the maoists. the idea should be such that whatever millage the maoists want to gain of this episode gets lost since public memory is too short and then have elections when the nepali congress can make the maximum millage.


    another interesting thing going on is the cold war of sorts being played by prc and by india backed by the US. whoever wins this battle will go a long way in determining of how the things get shaped in our backyard. this is a war worth watching and we will get a taste and a hang of the diplomatic games india will play in times to come. the master move in all this fiasco would be if all the communist parties were to form one grand alliance like the type we see here in india and if that were to happen, well then we could very well say goodbye to nepal. will this happen needs to be seen, as they say watch the space for more!


    PS: mods there are three threads on nepal, one by paaji (singh), second was started by pintu yesterday on this very issue and now this one. request is kindly merge all the threads.
     
  21. Rage

    Rage DFI TEAM Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2009
    Messages:
    5,410
    Likes Received:
    971
    Nepal in crisis as Maoist PM quits

    9 hours ago

    [​IMG]
    Maoist supporters rally in Nepal in support of the decision to sack the army chief​


    KATHMANDU (AFP) — Nepal's Maoist Prime Minister Prachanda resigned on Monday, plunging the country into a major political crisis triggered by a stand-off between his ex-rebels and the army chief.

    In a televised address to the nation, Prachanda said he was stepping down in response to an "unconstitutional and undemocratic" move by Nepal's president to stop the elected Maoist government from sacking the army chief.

    He also warned that the impoverished nation's 2006 peace deal, which ended a decade of civil war that left 13,000 dead, was in danger of falling apart.

    "I have resigned from the post of prime minister from today for the protection of democracy and peace," said Prachanda, who had been premier for just eight months.


    [​IMG]
    Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal is better known as Prachanda​


    The Maoist government had on Sunday fired the army chief, General Rookmangud Katawal, for refusing to integrate 19,000 former Maoist rebel soldiers into the regular army as stipulated by the peace accord.

    But President Ram Baran Yadav, a member of the main opposition party, on Monday told the head of the army -- traditionally a bastion of Nepal's elite and the former monarchy -- to stay put.
    "The move by the president is an attack on this infant democracy and the peace process," said Prachanda, a former school teacher who led the bitter insurgency before signing up for peace.
    "The interim constitution does not give any right to the president to act as a parallel power," he added, describing the crisis as centred around "the issue of civilian supremacy over the Nepal army."

    The decision by Prachanda -- whose real name is Pushpa Kamal Dahal, but who goes by a nom-de-guerre meaning "fierce one" -- leaves Nepal in political limbo and without an effective government.

    At the same time, the Maoists' rivals do not have enough seats in an interim assembly to form their own cabinet, while the political process is further complicated because Nepal's new, post-royal constitution has yet to be written.

    The Maoists' fighters are confined to United Nations-supervised camps but the army has refused to take in hardened guerrillas whom it views as politically indoctrinated.The army also accuses the Maoists of not fulfilling commitments to dismantle the paramilitary structure of their feared youth wing and not returning property grabbed during the civil war.

    Prachanda, however, has long argued that the dispute is merely part of a wider campaign to undermine his government, which was formed after the ex-rebels scored a surprise win in elections last year.

    Since the elections, the Maoists have managed to carry through with their pledge to abolish the monarchy but complain Nepal's traditional elite are blocking other key reforms -- such as on land ownership and the armed forces.

    Centrist parties, meanwhile, appear to have sided with the army against what they allege is an attempt by the Maoists to assume dictatorial powers.


    [​IMG]
    Student activists burn tyres to protest the sacking of the army chief​

    The crisis has already brought thousands of pro- and anti-Maoist demonstrators on to the streets of Kathmandu, with police maintaining a heavy presence to prevent any clashes.
    For now, however, Maoist officials said they had no plan to call out their rebel fighters -- who still have access to their weapons.

    "The PLA is still intact, although we have no plans to bring them out from the UN-monitored camps," former People's Liberation Army deputy commander Barsha Man Pun said.


    AFP: Nepal in crisis as Maoist PM quits
     

Share This Page