Nearly 6 in 10 Pakistanis view US as enemy

Discussion in 'Pakistan' started by bhramos, Jul 30, 2010.

  1. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    WASHINGTON – Despite billions in aid from Washington and a shared threat from extremists, Pakistanis have an overwhelmingly negative view of the United States, according to results of a Pew Research Center poll released Thursday.
    The survey also found that Pakistanis have grown less fearful of extremists seizing control of their country, perhaps reflecting gains that government troops have made against militants since early 2009.
    Most Pakistanis want improved relations with the United States, according to the poll. But most view the U.S. with suspicion, support for American involvement in the fight against extremists has declined, and nearly two-thirds want U.S. troops out of neighboring Afghanistan.
    Nearly six in 10 Pakistanis polled described the U.S. as an enemy and only one in 10 called it a partner.
    Public attitudes in Pakistan figure importantly in the Obama administration's strategy for strengthening the U.S. partnership with Pakistan to help defeat al-Qaida and stabilize Afghanistan. Another U.S. worry is the prospect of Pakistan's nuclear weapons falling into the hands of militants.
    The Obama administration persuaded Congress this year to approve $7.5 billion in aid to Pakistan over five years. Since the 9/11 attacks the U.S. had provided Pakistan with billions linked to counterterrorist work. On a visit to Pakistan last week, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announced a raft of new aid projects worth $500 million.
    Mistrust of the U.S. among Pakistanis appears due in part to Washington's decision to turn away from their country after enlisting its support to defeat the Soviets in Afghanistan in the 1980s.
    "They vividly remember us walking out in 1989 and being left to deal with their own security situation on their own," Defense Secretary Robert Gates told a Pentagon news conference Thursday. "The notion that, under those circumstances and not knowing whether they could count on us to be there, that they would hedge in one way or another is not a surprise."
    State Department spokesman P.J. Crowley said that the administration is aware of a "deficit of trust." "It is important to, over time, demonstrate to the people of Pakistan that the United States is genuinely interested in a different long-term relationship," Crowley said.
    The U.S. is not directly involved in ground combat operations in Pakistan, but some dozens of U.S. troops are helping train Pakistani forces. The U.S. also has an unacknowledged program of launching airstrikes from drone aircraft at Taliban and al-Qaida figures inside Pakistan.
    The strikes by CIA drones are widely unpopular in Pakistan. The Pew poll found that of those who had heard about drone attacks, 93 percent said they are a bad thing, 90 percent said they kill too many innocents, and 49 percent said they are being done without the Pakistani government's approval.
    Without mentioning drone strikes, Vice President Joe Biden on Thursday rejected suggestions that al-Qaida is becoming entrenched in Pakistan and said the U.S. is making inroads against extremists.
    "I assure you, we are doing significant damage to al-Qaida in Pakistan as well as in Afghanistan, so we're making progress," Biden said in an interview that was taped Wednesday at Fort Drum., N.Y., and broadcast Thursday on NBC's "Today" show. "But the truth of the matter is that there's more to go."
    Despite receiving billions in U.S. aid since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, many Pakistanis believe the U.S. gives them little or none, according to the poll. About a quarter of those questioned said the U.S. provides a lot of financial aid. Nearly a quarter said it provides a little aid, 10 percent said the U.S. gives hardly any, and 16 percent believe the U.S. gives Pakistan no aid.
    The poll also found that only eight percent of Pakistanis express confidence that President Barack Obama will do the right thing in world affairs — his lowest rating among 22 nations that Pew polled in April. Seventeen percent expressed a favorable view of the U.S., and 64 percent said it is important for relations with the United States to improve.
    The Pew poll consisted of face-to-face interviews in April with 2,000 adults in areas of Pakistan that represent about 84 percent of the nation's adult population. The Federally Administered Tribal Areas — the region along the Afghan border where al-Qaida is believed to have found haven and where the Pakistani government has little control — was not included in the survey.
    In its May 2009 survey of Pakistanis, Pew found that 69 percent were very or somewhat worried about extremist groups taking control of their country. That was one month after the Pakistani army began a large-scale offensive against extremists in the Swat Valley, some 100 miles from Islamabad.
    This year's poll found that 51 percent expressed concern about a takeover by extremists.
    Pakistanis also said they feel less threatened by the Taliban and much less by al-Qaida. The proportion who considered al-Qaida a serious threat fell from 61 percent last year to 38 percent this year. The equivalent numbers with regard to the Taliban fell from 73 percent to 54 percent.
    The shift in opinion could be seen as a positive trend if it reflects actual setbacks for the extremists in battles with government forces.
    But it also could cut the other way. If Pakistanis see less of a threat from militants, that could undercut U.S. efforts to persuade their government to expand its offensive against insurgents and to take on the groups of greatest concern to the U.S., including al-Qaida.
    The poll also found that while the Taliban and al-Qaida are unpopular in Pakistan, negative views toward them have become a little less prevalent over the past year, while positive views have increased.
    Eighteen percent said they view al-Qaida with favor, compared to nine percent a year ago and 25 percent in 2008. Fifty-three percent had an unfavorable view of the group, compared to 61 percent a year ago and 34 percent in 2008.
    Not surprisingly, Pakistanis said the biggest threat to their country is longtime rival India.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100729/ap_on_go_ot/us_pakistan_poll
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2010
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  3. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Big deal?Pakistanis got to be suspicious about usa intentions after its 6 decades of treacherous experience with later????Btw you ve to be suspicious about usa otherwise it will burn your house.
     
  4. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    Its Vis-a-Vis to both, same to US, be safe or else it will burn your house like 9/11 Twin Towers

    [​IMG]
     
  5. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Who started it first usa or pakistan??????
     
  6. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    Its like who born first "Hen or Egg" ?
    doesnt that mean to it, but i think US started it first!
     
  7. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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  8. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    But still Fire is Fire, we are next to it!
    How can we stop it?
    Is the Nuke only the Answer for this Question for USA?
    meanwhile good find about Chick. ..........
     
  9. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    either one has to go down but others will sure get the burn injuries.
     
  10. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Pakistan likes Al Qaeda more than America

    The US is in the middle of a $7.5 billion aid program to Pakistan. But America's image is slipping in the country, where its unfavorable rating is almost as bad as the Taliban's and even Al Qaeda is more popular.

    Lahore, Pakistan
    The Pakistan Taliban may be responsible for attacks that have killed more than 1,000 civilians this year. The US may be in the midst of providing the country with $7.5 billion in aid. But average Pakistanis like the United States less than Al Qaeda and just a little more than the Taliban.Roughly 17 percent of Pakistanis have a favorable view of the US in a new poll by the Pew Research Center's Global Attitudes Project, while 59 percent described the US as an "enemy" of Pakistan. The Taliban's numbers? About 15 percent view the group favorably (up from 10 percent a year ago). Al Qaeda pips both groups, with 18 percent of Pakistanis viewing the group favorably, up from 9 percent a year ago.

    The survey was conducted among 2,000 Pakistanis from April 13-28, 2010.

    The findings are likely to add more fuel to the domestic debate over whether American largess is advancing US interests in the region. A vast trove of United States government documents released by the website Wikileaks this week added more evidence for the belief that Pakistan supports the Taliban inside Afghanistan, leaving many Americans wondering if some of the aid to Pakistan isn't ending up in the hands of Taliban operatives trying to kill US soldiers in Afghanistan. Capturing the mood, influential US humorist Jon Stewart said this week: "We have ostensibly put a hit out on ourselves. This is insanity."

    In Pakistan, opposition to conditions attached to the $7.5 billion aid package and ongoing concern about civilian causalities in US drone strikes aimed at Al Qaeda leaders are major factors fueling anti-Americanism, says Christine Fair, a political scientist at Georgetown University.

    Blaming Blackwater, India

    A surge of conspiracy theories that absolve the Taliban for recent sectarian attacks and instead blame outside forces may help explain the decreased perception of a threat from the Taliban.

    “The narrative is these attacks are being carried out by India or Blackwater,” says Professor Fair, referring to the controversial US security contractor now known as Xe. And ordinary Pakistanis are dismayed by what they see as increasingly close US ties with rival India. About 53 percent of Pakistanis described India as the greatest threat to the country, while 23 percent see the Taliban as the greatest threat.

    In the Main Market shopping area of Lahore, Pakistan’s cultural hub, traders and shoppers are almost unanimous in voicing dissatisfaction with Pakistan’s relationship with the United States.

    “What kind of friends are the Americans? They are our false friends and in reality are trying to tear us apart. That’s why they are maintaining good relations with India who back the Taliban, while at the same time giving our leaders money to fight the Taliban,” says Muhammad Yousuf, a retired shopkeeper, while sipping tea after Friday prayers.

    Several people express the view that the Taliban were not behind attacks on two-Ahmadi sect mosques in May that killed more than 100 people, or the attack on the Data Ganj Baksh shrine in Lahore in July that killed some 40 people.“Who can say who carried out these attacks? No Muslims could have possibly attacked other Muslims like this,” says Riaz Ahmad, a parking attendant.

    Whisper campaigns and drone allegations

    Whisper campaigns, carried out by extremist organizations and often circulated by text messages, are partly to blame for the proliferation of such theories, says Professor Fair, and may be backed by Pakistan’s military establishment. “Such campaigns are fostered by the establishment itself to continue to create the space where they can turn around and tell the US they are being limited. So they can say 'Give us more goodies and we’ll hate you less.'”

    The threat to civilian life posed by US predator drones, she says, is similarly overblown and helps foment hatred towards America. “The discourse around the drones obfuscates the fact that the drones are operated from a Pakistani airflield,” she says, adding that the number of civilian casualties reported in the Pakistani media are “not realistic.”

    While more educated and affluent Pakitanis generally recognize Al Qaeda, the Taliban, and the Punjab-based militant outfit Lashkar-e-Taiba as a threat, few trust America or view it as a reliable ally.

    “[The Americans] look after their own strategic interests when it suits them. They stop supporting Pakistan when it doesn’t suit them,” says Jalal Hussain, a law student. He is among the minority who describe the Islamist insurgency in the country’s northwest as “the most serious threat facing Pakistan right now."

    Pakistanis dissatisfied with leaders

    The survey also shows that Pakistanis have a bleak view of their own country: 84 percent of Pakistanis are dissatisfied with the state of their nation, and 78 percent say the current economic situation is very bad or somewhat bad. President Zardari’s popularity ratings have dropped to about 20 percent, down from 64 percent when he took office.

    According to the survey, there is widespread support for harsher Islamic punishments in Pakistan, with 82 percent in favor of stoning to death adulterers and 76 percent in favor of the death penalty for apostasy. Eighty-five percent expressed support for gender segregation in the workplace.

    Such statistics should be treated with caution, says Fair of Georgetown University.

    “An inherent flaw with such questions is what is known as ‘social desirability bias’, where the respondent anticipates what answer might be socially desirable. Very few people are going to reject options that are going to sound more Islamic because they might be judged by the questioner,” she says.
     
  11. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Not that I'm defending US but Pakistan also to be blamed equally for the current predicament it faces. It was the Pakistanis that went to US to be of help not the other way round. It was the US that has propped up the Pakistan all these decades but Pakistani elite used this help to fill their pockets and to fight against India instead of developing themselves in a self-sustainable manner. Pakistanis should thanks their stars that they are being kept afloat due to the dole that US gives to Pakistan for its civilian, military and other purposes. The reason for hating US is because of vitriol that is poured against US in the Urdu media and brain wash the majority population.
     
  12. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    I'm only hoping that this nation be declared as a Terror-sponsoring nation by UN. They have missed this infamy by inches previously. But if they continue on the current trajectory that day might not be that faraway.
     
  13. JBH22

    JBH22 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Going through you tube videos is the greatest thing you get an overview of what the average Pakistani thinks the most funny argument undeniably would be the CIA-RAW-MOSSAD nexus to destroy their purist nation.Though some reasonable voices are still on chek this video

    Sethi: Kashmir & Water Dispute





    Good that we get to hear that apart from Zaleel beating homo war-dreams
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  14. ammar26

    ammar26 Regular Member

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    Nearly 6 in 10 Pakistanis view US as enemy .... I thought it was 9 instead of 6
     
    musalman likes this.

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