Narendra Modi's Grand Plan for Kashmir

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by sorcerer, Mar 12, 2015.

  1. sukhish

    sukhish Senior Member Senior Member

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    he has no grand plan, he is busy looking for his sarkar, exports declining rapidly, manufacturing also declining.
    keep up the good work
     
  2. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS
    Balochistan and Kashmir: Modi has reminded Pakistan that it lives in a glass house

    On Aug. 15, Narendra Modi’s speech at India’s 70th Independence Day celebration was unremarkable, except for one explosive word: Balochistan

    “The people of Balochistan, the people of Gilgit, the people of Pakistan-occupied Kashmir have thanked me in such a manner, from places that I have never been and never had a chance to meet, they have sent wishes to the people of India and thanked us,” the Indian prime minister said. “I am grateful to them.”

    It was more than a tactical counterpunch in response to Pakistan’s raking up of the turmoil in Jammu and Kashmir over the past few weeks. After all, on Aug.14, Pakistan’s Independence Day, prime minister Nawaz Sharif dedicated the country’s independence to the “freedom of Kashmir” from Indian rule.

    Read in line with a series of recent statements from the Indian government, it marks a bigger shift. For, this is the second time in the past week that Modi himself has mentioned Balochistan.

    “Pakistan forgets that it bombs its own citizens using fighter planes. The time has come when Pakistan shall have to answer to the world for the atrocities committed by it against people in Balochistan and PoK (Pakistan-occupied Kashmir),” Modi said last week, referring to Pakistan’s purported role in the Kashmir unrest.

    Earlier, India’s hawkish national security advisor AK Doval had almost issued a threat to Pakistan when he said that India’s troublesome neighbour could lose Balochistan if there was a repeat of the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks. “You do one more Mumbai, you lose Balochistan,” Doval had said in 2014, a few months before he became Modi’s top security advisor.

    Yet, what matters this time is the stage from which Modi made his latest assertion.

    “The larger message from the Indian prime minister to Pakistan is that those who live in glass houses should not throw stones,” said G Parthasarathy, a former Indian high commissioner to Pakistan. “What India is saying now is that we have long ignored the Balochistan issue. But that doesn’t mean we can’t raise the issue.”

    This is a remarkable change for India, which has traditionally avoided getting tagged to the tumult in the Pakistani province. In fact, Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party had cried “shame” in 2009 when an Indo-Pak joint statement signed by former prime minister Manmohan Singh and his Pakistani counterpart Yousaf Raza Gilani, mentioned Balochistan during the Non-Aligned Movement summit in the Egyptian resort of Sharm el-Sheikh.

    After Modi’s Aug.15 speech, many leaders-in-exile of the Balochistan movement predictably came out in support.

    “I thank prime minister Narendra Modi saheb on behalf of the whole Baloch nation,” Brahumdagh Bugti, the founding chief of the Baloch Republican Party, said. “And we hope that the Indian government and Indian media and the whole Indian nation will not only raise voices for the Baloch nation but also strive to help practically the Baloch independence movement.”

    So, what is it about Balochistan?
    Like Kashmir, Balochistan, too, has a chequered history—one mired in military intervention and annexation.

    At the time of British India’s partition in 1947, the Khan of Kalat, Mir Sir Ahmad Yar Khan Ahmedzai, a monarch who ruled Balochistan, chose to keep his territory an independent and sovereign state. In fact, Pakistan’s founding fatherMohammad Ali Jinnah was instrumental in ensuring the state’s independence. However, Jinnah later decided to ask Balochistan to accede to Pakistan, a move strongly opposed by the Khan. In 1948, the Pakistani army moved in to enforce Balochistan’s accession

    Since then, there have been five uprisings and reports suggest that thousands have been missing since the armed conflict began.

    Islamabad’s reaction to Modi’s Independence Day speech was along expected lines.

    “PM Modi’s reference to Balochistan, which is an integral part of Pakistan, only proves Pakistan’s contention that India, through intelligence agency RAW, has been fomenting terrorism in Balochistan,” Sartaj Aziz, a former national security advisor of Pakistan and an advisor to the foreign affairs ministry, said.

    The government of Pakistan is particularly concerned over the region due to two main reasons. One, Balochistan is mineral rich. Second, it is building a huge port in the town of Gwadar in the province with massive investment from its all-weather friend China. Any turmoil in Balochistan, therefore, could set alarm bells ringing in Beijing.

    Loud and clear
    Modi’s mention of the war-torn Pakistani province is a shot across the bows that came following the recent turmoil in Jammu and Kashmir, in which more than 50 civilians have died and thousands have been injured. New Delhi has steadfastly maintained that the unrest was being fanned from across the border.


    “If there is one thing that the Modi government has telegraphed over its two years in power, it is that it will not sit quietly amid provocations from Pakistan, and that it will not hold back from taking a harder line when the need arises,” Michael Kugelman, a senior associate for south and southeast Asia at the Washington DC-based Woodrow Wilson International Centre for Scholars, said.


    This hardening of stance comes after Modi initially took a more conciliatory approach at the start of his term.

    Changing ties
    In December last year, India and Pakistan had seemed to bury the hatchet when the two governments agreed to resume a “comprehensive bilateral dialogue” that would broadly discuss and probably find solutions for issues between the countries.

    Much of that cooperation was achieved at a meeting between the national security advisors of India and Pakistan in Bangkok, where they discussed issues ranging from peace and security, terrorism, and Jammu and Kashmir. The same month, Modi even flew down to Pakistan while returning from Afghanistan, a move that had raised eyebrows in India. Modi was the first Indian prime minister to visit Pakistan since 2004, a gesture that signalled an improvement in relations.

    But in the wake of a terrorist attack in Pathankot in January this year, the short-lived friendship went into a downward spiral. By April, the secretary-level talks were suspended after Pakistan refused to give India access to Jaish-e-Mohammed chief Masood Azhar for the probe into the Pathankot attack.

    By July, the talks seemed to go completely off the tracks after India blamed Pakistan for the crisis in Kashmir.

    “The government must have good reasons to think Pakistan had stepped up its activity in Jammu and Kashmir,” Sanjaya Baru, a consulting fellow at the International Institute for Strategic Studies and a media advisor to former prime minister Manmohan Singh, said.

    “Pakistan has been unusually assertive about India’s current Kashmir crises,” said Christine Fair, an associate professor at Georgetown University. “I think reminding Pakistan to mind its own business is refreshing. I think Modi has been overly accommodating of Pakistani hijinks. Such a move is well overdue, in my view.”

    So what happens to the relationship now?

    “There is no way forward,” said Fair. “The Pakistan army does not want peace. Indian ‘mombatti wallah’ and ‘aman ki asha’ types need to understand this.”


    http://qz.com/755971/by-2030-five-i...ies-as-big-as-middle-incomes-countries-today/
     
  3. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    In a first, J&K BJP becomes single largest party in LC


    For the first time in J&K’s legislative history, the BharatiyaJanata Party on Friday became the single largest party in the upper house after the Legislative Council chairman Hajji Inayat Ali accepted the resignation of former Peoples Democratic Party MLC, Vikramaditya Singh.


    “Vikramaditya Singh, member of the Jammu and Kashmir Legislative Council, tendered his resignation from the membership of the House on October 24, 2017. The chairman, Jammu and Kashmir Legislative Council has accepted his resignation. Accordingly, the seat which was occupied by Vikramaditya has fallen vacant w.e.f October 24, 2017,” read a notification issued by the Legislative Council secretariat.

    With his resignation, the PDP’s tally in the House has got reduced to 10 and it may take a few more days for the party to equalise the number of seats held by its alliance partner.

    Before Singh’s resignation, the PDP and BJP held 11 seats each in the ‘House of Elders.’

    The distinction of being single largest party in the Upper House may be held by the BJP for a few days, but it is a record for the right-wing party in J&K which had managed to send only one of its members to the Upper House before it formed the government with PDP in 2015. The BJP was never the single largest party in either of the two law-making houses of the state.

    An official told Greater Kashmir that the government would soon approach the J&K Governor to fill up the vacancy.

    “Vikramaditya became member of the House on the nomination quota. The government would propose another name to Governor to fill up the seat,” he said.

    Before 2015, the BJP had managed to send only one MLC to the Upper House—DayaKrishanKotwal, who was elected during Farooq Abdullah’s regime between 1996-2002.

    The existing strength of the Upper House is 33, with BJP leading the tally with 11 seats, followed by PDP with 10 seats. The opposition National Conference and Congress have six members each.

    In the 36-member house, three seats including the seat of Vikramaditya are vacant. The two other seats are vacant due to non-holding of elections for urban local bodies in the state.

    The incumbent BJP MLCs include CheringDorjay, SofiYousuf, Charanjit Singh, Vibodh Gupta, Ashok Khajuria, Ramesh Arora, Ajatshatru Singh, Surinder Mohan Ambardar, GiridhariLal Raina, Pradeep Sharma and Vikram Randhawa.

    Of them, three—Sofi, Ambardar and Raina—were either elected or nominated on the seats reserved for Kashmir in the Upper House. The PDP men in the House include Hajji Inayat Ali (chairman), NaeemAkther, YasirReshi, Yashpal Sharma, Firdous Ahmad Tak, SurinderChoudhary, Zaffar Iqbal Manhas, SaifuddinBhat, Muhammad KhurshidAlam and Javaid Ahmad Mirchal.

    In the MLC elections held earlier this year, PDP lost a sure seat after its ally Baqir Rizvi voted in favour of BJP.



    http://www.greaterkashmir.com/news/...ecomes-single-largest-party-in-lc/265668.html
     
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  4. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Priority is to prevent Kashmir from turning into Syria: New interlocutor

    An old Kashmir hand, who headed the Intelligence Bureau (IB) for two years from December 2015, Sharma says his mission to bring an end to violence would also include talking to anyone "even a rickshaw puller or a cart puller" who can contribute so that peace is ushered in the state "as soon as possible".

    The biggest challenge and the top priority in Kashmir are to deradicalize Kashmiri youth and militants and prevent it from turning into a Syria of India, says Dineshwar Sharma, the newly-named interlocutor for talks in Jammu and Kashmir.

    An old Kashmir hand, who headed the Intelligence Bureau (IB) for two years from December 2015, Sharma says his mission to bring an end to violence would also include talking to anyone "even a rickshaw puller or a cart puller" who can contribute so that peace is ushered in the state "as soon as possible".


    He says he is personally pained to see the path Kashmiris, particularly youth, have chosen that would only destroy the society.

    "I feel the pain and sometimes I become emotional also. I want to see this kind of violence ends as soon as possible from all sides. The youth of Kashmir like Zakir Musa (Kashmir Al Qaeda chief) and Burhan Wani (slain Hizbul Mujahideen commander) get hype when they talk about (establishing Islamic) Caliphate," Sharma told IANS in an interview, referring to the new-age Kashmir militant commanders.

    He said the way youth of Kashmir were moving, "which is radicalization", would ultimately "finish the Kashmir society itself.


    "I am worried about the people of Kashmir. If all this picked up, the situation will be like Yemen, Syria and Libya. People will start fighting in so many groups. So, it is very important that everybody, all of us, contribute so that suffering of Kashmiris end.

    "I will have to convince the youth of Kashmir that they are only ruining their future and the future of all Kashmiris in the name of whether they call it azadi (independence), Islamic caliphate or Islam. You can take examples like Pakistan, Libya, Yemen or any country where such things are going. They have become the most violent places in the world. So, I want to see that it doesn't happen in India."

    The former IPS officer, who led the spy agency's "Islamist Terrorism Desk" between 2003 and 2005, was named on Monday to open talks in a bid to end the nearly three-decade-old insurgency in Kashmir.

    When the IB was investigating the fledgling modules of the Islamic State in Kerala, Maharashtra and Andhra Pradesh in 2015, Sharma is widely known to have advocated a policy of arresting the problem by counselling and reforming, instead of arresting the potential recruits of the global terror network.

    The soft-spoken intelligence veteran is known to have established friendly relationships with arrested militants in a bid to reform them when he was Assistant Director IB from 1992-94 - the time when militancy was at its peak in Jammu and Kashmir.

    Serving in Kashmir as an IB man, Sharma was instrumental in the arrest of then Hizbul Mujahideen commander Master Ahsan Dar in 1993 after he broke away from Syed Salahuddin - the Hizb chief based in Pakistan-administered Kashmir.

    He recalled how he had met Dar in Srinagar jails and how the militant commander asked him to bring his daughter and son to meet him in the prison. "I actually took them to meet him."

    Asked If he had identified the way to reach out to the youth in Kashmir, Sharma said he was still working out the modalities.

    "I am open to talking to everybody. Anybody who believes in peace and wants to come and give me some ideas how to go about, I am willing to listen. He can be an ordinary student, ordinary youth, a rickshawwala or a thelawala with some good idea. I will consider that."

    He was asked if he had started reaching out to Hurriyat leaders, who have maintained silence over his appointment even though they had dropped hints in their statements about engaging in "constructive" talks with the government of India after some of their aides were arrested in funding case.

    Sharma cautiously replied: "Let me see. I am ready to talk to everybody. Anybody who wants to contribute to peace."

    Replying to a query that radicalisation of Kashmiri youth was a more recent phenomenon than the problem of Kashmir itself, Sharma said the state was almost at peace before the 2008 unrest over a land row and the 2016 wave of violent street protests after the killing of Burhan Wani.

    "Somehow the minds of youths and students have been diverted somewhere else. That is the point of address. I have seen the violence in Kashmir from very close quarters. I was posted in Srinagar. So the kind of violence I have seen, I am really pained. I am very sad."

    Commenting on the previous attempts by the government of nominating peace emissaries and other initiatives to solve the problem, he said he would "desperately like to try some new ideas".

    "I am studying the reports (of previous interlocutors) but other than that I am trying to see some new ideas."

    Kashmir is not Sharma's first assignment of brokering peace. In June this year, he was tasked to initiate a dialogue with insurgent groups in Assam, including the United Liberation Front of Assam (ULFA) and those representing Bodos.

    Asked over any difference between his previous peace brokering assignment and the new one, he said; "The big difference is that there is not any involvement of Pakistan and any third country in the northeast."

    http://www.greaterkashmir.com/news/interviews/story/264367.html
     
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  5. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Despite opposition, J&K Govt completes GST registration in state
    Despite opposition to the implementation of GST in the state by the Kashmir-based trade bodies, J&K government says it has completed the registration of traders and business units under the Goods and Services Tax regime across the state.

    As per the official data of Commercial Taxes Department, which has been converted into a nodal agency post GST to overlook registration of traders and collection of GST in Jammu and Kashmir, it has registered 74,800 traders.


    Additional Commissioner, Commercial Taxes Department, Shameem Wani said, “Almost 100 percent registration of GST has been completed in J&K. We have registered 74,800 traders under the new tax regime.”

    Shameem informed that earlier a trader having annual turnover of Rs 10 lakh per year had to get enrolled with the department. “However, under GST traders having above Rs 20 lakh annual turnover is required to get GST registration. There are many trader who were earlier registered with our department but now they are exempted for registering under GST as their turnover is below the slab of Rs 20 lakh per annum,” he said.

    The new tax regime, which faced lot of opposition in Kashmir, came to force in the state only after State Assembly passed a resolution in its favor, followed by a Presidential Constitutional Amendment Order, 2017.


    However, to oppose its implementation, Kashmiri traders and business bodies formed Jammu and Kashmir Coordination Committee – an amalgam of trade associations, business chambers – which is now demanding rollback of the GST, stating that it has “diluted fiscal autonomy of the state”.

    But on ground contrary to the opposition, the J&K in four months has witnessed GST registration by majority of traders and business, who have switched from earlier commercial taxes to GST.

    Convener, J&K Coordination Committee, Siraj Ahmad said, “GST is a black law which has taken away our fiscal autonomy. We will keep opposing, till it is rolled backed from J&K. Our state had special fiscal autonomy to tax goods and services, but with implementation of this tax regime it has been diluted.”

    “You are now witnessing how our CM and FM has to go begging in front of GST Council to lower tax rates of items, which was not the case earlier as we had fiscal independence to tax or exempt good and services,” he said adding that “ JKCC will continue their fight against its implementation in JK.”
    http://www.greaterkashmir.com/news/...mpletes-gst-registration-in-state/265773.html
     
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  6. SREEKAR

    SREEKAR HELLRAIDER21 Senior Member

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    It will turn into Syria and Libya if these seperatists are entertained above the actual limit.
    Until or unless pants of ISI and PA are wet...
    until or unless we show ISI and PA death in close angle..that too in HD. Things won't change in Kashmir.
     
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  7. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    GIve it a bit of time..
    Its only now that we are seriously working to reclaim the pakistan occupied Kashmir.
    All these years the scamgress was slowly slipping everything in favor of pakistan and china.

    We are gaining momentum and never fall for the propaganda paki dalals play in India.
     
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  8. SREEKAR

    SREEKAR HELLRAIDER21 Senior Member

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    Interesting times ahead.
    ..
    ..
    ..
     
  9. Bhumihar

    Bhumihar Jako Rakhe Saiyan Mar Sake Na Koi Senior Member

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    I say we plant bomb and blow up whichever party is using this srperation agitation for their benefit, no one but the terrorist will be up for blame.
    If few scums are eradicated for the better of the valley then RAW shoudnt mind the blood stain on their hands.
     
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  10. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    There is nothing like making the pak dalals useless for pakistan. blowing up is an easy task which can have negative implications. Our Indian army is doing that part fair and square.
    They are also from time to time discovering bullet ridden rotten bodies of militants and other terror aspirants from the valley (mysteriously)

    BUT..We have to make the adventures of pak dala costly, very costly can only a political environment take shape which is pro Indian.pak dalals should not gain anything from being with pak anymore.

    Only then we can assure a consistent political and democratic mileage in J&K else it will always be a fire play and ordinary civilians will get crushed between them. This will create more unrest for the center govt which is focusing on development all over India and a conductive economic and political environment for economy...Anyway we have Kashmir on the simmer right now.

    Politically GoI is trying to make J&K mainstream with India via connectivity and by economy.
    rest will follow through.

    pakistan economy will lose another 2 billion in the coming months. :D
     
  11. SREEKAR

    SREEKAR HELLRAIDER21 Senior Member

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    They won't worry even if they lose another 4 billion.
    Pakistani Generals will get funds fro US and China.
    Those are enough to feed their tummies.
    Bhaad me gaya kaum.
    And pehle ye batao kaise 2 billion kho baitenge yeh chutiiya kaum.
     
  12. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    these generals will never fund the paki economy with their loot. :D
    paki economy will lose 2 billion and it will further detabilize pakistan which even the generals cant help.
     
  13. SREEKAR

    SREEKAR HELLRAIDER21 Senior Member

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    Thats what I say. Paki Generals won't care even if they lose 4 billion next year.
    Their bank accounts are being credited by US tax payer's money. And what else they want to survive? Uh?
    By the way u didn't answer my question.
    How they will lose? Is it related to chabahar port mess?
     
  14. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Absolutely...the port diplomacy :D
     
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  15. dhananjay1

    dhananjay1 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Kashmir problem is never going to be solved with armed forces or diplomacy. Large scale Hindu settlement is the only thing that will work, but I see no government that has balls or vision to do it.
     
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  16. anoop_mig25

    anoop_mig25 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Without providng any adequate support to hindus I donot think any Hindu like to become belly ka bakra

    If things continued like they are now even Jammu would be free of hindus soon

    Only solu i see either india get whole of JnK or pak gets or we have some how get separated by pak due to some natural reason
     
  17. Yggdrasil

    Yggdrasil Regular Member

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    Nope - it can be done. Forget Hindu settlement for now.

    1) Start protests and unrest in PoK
    2) Keep neutralising Porki infiltrators
    3) Repeal 370
    4) Start massive infowar (already seen in Twitter)

    Once you demoralise the Porkis and make it clear to Kashmiris and the govt is never gonna bend, Porkis are finished.
     
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  18. HariPrasad-1

    HariPrasad-1 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Modi is a 100% patriot. He won't mind being depicted as bad. He will do whatever is necessary in most human way. He always uses sentiment of people in mind and will be ruthless only in the extreme case.
     
  19. indus

    indus Regular Member

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    Till any overt step is taken to support Baloch or any clear attempt to snatch PoK I will not believe there is any Grannd plan for j&k.
     
  20. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Power lines may help quell a 70-year-old conflict in Kashmir

    .
    In Prime Minister Narendra Modi's push to supply electricity to every Indian household, connecting homes in the state of Jammu & Kashmir might be the toughest.

    Along India's violence-prone northern border, engineers and construction workers are hauling tons of high-tension wires and steel frames on pack mules across barren deserts and mountain ravines to electrify one of the country's most inhospitable states. Still, the effort, budgeted to cost Rs 4,800 crore ($740 million), may turn out to be Modi's most rewarding.

    In some villages, winter outages persist for 20 hours a day even as temperatures dip to minus 35 degrees Celsius (minus 31 degrees Fahrenheit). Modi is counting on 24x7 power to both warm homes and hearts in the Muslim-majority state, where as many as 70,000 terrorists, security forces and civilians have died in independence-fueled clashes in the past three decades. Construction of key infrastructure in the Kashmir Valley may be helping.

    "People understand the value of this project since very few large development projects are happening in the valley," said Pratik Agarwal, chief executive officer of Sterlite Power Transmission Ltd., which is building the state's first private transmission line. "We have been getting incredible support as power is something people can relate to -- it's something that everyone wants."




    [​IMG]
    Protests Subside

    When the first equipment reached a spot about 40 kilometers (25 miles) from Srinagar, one of the state's two capital cities, in May 2016, locals protested what they thought was the makings of an army camp. As an electrical substation emerged, opposition gave way. Now, two neighboring villages are squabbling over rights to get their name on it.

    The enthusiasm reflects an eagerness for electricity in a state lacking a fifth of the peak energy it needs. It also points to infrastructure as a potential avenue for Modi's Bharatiya Janata Party to garner greater support from Muslim Kashmiris, some of whom have violently opposed the controlling force of New Delhi, 825 kilometers south of Srinagar.

    Electricity shortages have long been a bane in the Kashmir Valley, and providing reliable, affordable, constant power could go some way in quelling unrest, according to Noor Ahmad Baba, dean of the school of social sciences at the Central University of Kashmir.

    Baba traces a connection between lack of electricity and militancy, drawing from his observations as a youth in the late 1980s, when insurgency escalated in Kashmir.

    'Lot of Discontent'

    "Poor electricity supplies not only deprive Kashmiris of education, employment and medical facilities, but also very basic things like entertainment and communication," he said over the phone from Srinagar. "This leads to a lot of discontent."

    While the state's capitals, Srinagar and Jammu, have electricity most of the day, towns and villages like Haft Chinar, on the outskirts of Srinagar, don't. "We barely get power now -- three-to-four hours a day at best," said Tanveer Hussain, 40, who helps guard a newly built substation that he sees improving lives. "This has helped a lot of us. We got jobs and hope to get power, too, so my children can study and have a better life."

    The lack of power is an economic drain on the state, according to Fayaz Ahmad Punjabi, junior vice president of the Kashmir Chamber of Commerce and Industry. "Electricity is like food for industry, it's a necessity," he said. "But in Kashmir today, it's a luxury. So industry suffers, people suffer. Power is life, and we don't have enough of it."

    Modi's Pledge

    Modi pledged to bring power to 18,452 unelectrified villages within 1,000 days in his August 2015 Independence Day national address. As of Oct. 31, electricity had reached 15,218 or 82 percent of those villages. In Jammu and Kashmir, 100 out of 134 villages, encompassing 270,000 households, lacking electricity were still waiting to be connected.

    The government is trying to speed up progress with two transmission-line projects.



    [​IMG]
    The Sterlite project will bring power from Jalandhar, in northern Punjab state, to Amargarh, near Srinagar, along a 441-kilometer line running parallel to the so-called Line of Control that marks part of India's de facto northern border with Pakistan.

    The project, which will cost more than Rs 2,600 crore, is almost finished and Sterlite aims to start supplying as much as 1,000 megawatts to the power-starved valley in late December, several months ahead of schedule.

    A dearth of suitable roads in some remote areas meant dozens of mules were used to haul construction material and Sterlite hired an air crane from Erickson Inc. to lift pieces for transmission towers to peaks as high as 3.8 kilometer (12,500 feet) in the Pir Panjal Range.

    "We got incredible support from the state government," said Agarwal, Sterlite's CEO. "We've been working relentlessly despite the curfews, despite the unrest in Kashmir."

    Winter Freeze

    A second project managed by state-owned Power Grid Corp. will run electricity 350 kilometers from Srinagar to the Ladakh region in the state's northeast, bordering China.

    "Kashmir and Ladakh freeze in winter," said Nirmal Kumar Singh, Jammu & Kashmir's deputy chief minister, in an interview. "Transmission is a big hurdle."

    The state's peak power demand is about 2,700 megawatts, though it gets merely 2,100 megawatts -- about 1,100 megawatts from hydro electricity produced within the state and the rest from other states through an existing Power Grid transmission line. A lack of transmission capacity prevents it bringing in more.

    Dark Winters

    Ladakh, a desert region with about 300,000 people between the Himalayan and Karakoram mountains, gets only about 25 megawatts of hydroelectricity in summer. In winter, it plunges into darkness, save a couple of hours each day when army-supplied, diesel-powered generators run.

    Power Grid's line will cost Rs 2,200 crore and carry as much as 150 megawatts of electricity over mountains 4.6 kilometers above sea level when it's completed in 2018.

    "Our line passes through Drass, one of the coldest and highest inhabited places," said Anil Jain, an executive director with Power Grid, who anticipates electricity demand in Ladakh will boom once homes and businesses are connected to the grid.

    Providing power shows that the government in New Delhi is eager to develop the state and support the local economy, but more work is needed to resolve long-standing grievances, including a resumption of talks between India and Pakistan to settle a territorial dispute over Kashmir, said Zahid Shahab Ahmed, a research fellow at Deakin University in Melbourne, who focuses on peace and security in the Muslim world.


    'Deep Wounds'

    "Deep wounds cannot just be healed by the constant supply of electricity," Ahmed said. "The people of Jammu & Kashmir need other freedoms, including security of their lives."

    The power projects may be helping on that front, too, by forging a more conciliatory and collaborative approach.

    After Sterlite faced initial resistance from locals, it suspected that state-sponsored protection could make it more vulnerable to attack and found it could better manage security using a private company staffed by mostly locals.

    Linking the remote Himalayan region to the national power grid symbolizes a commitment to strengthen ties with the country's farthest state, said Baba at the Central University of Kashmir.

    "The central government's push to increase power supplies is an important indicator that it's serious about bringing the state back into the national mainstream," he said.

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