Naming..Shaming..and Taming pakistan-Full Version

Discussion in 'Foreign Relations' started by sorcerer, Oct 16, 2016.

  1. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    This thread is to put together all the diplomatic,tactical and strategic offensives initiated by GoI against pakistan to make pakistan behave like a soverign nation as its supposed to be.

    We have a lot of threads on different topics and objectives initiated by the GoI..I was thinking may be if we can put it all together it will be a nice repository archive for the future...in making a new pakistan history.

    This will also allow us to gauge the progress achieved in Real world than the politics on matters of national security using coercive diplomacy and soft power with the military backing.


    Why PM Modi mentioned Baluchistan in his Independence Day address
    Highlights
    • Officials said Modi's I-Day speech was designed to remind the world about human rights abuses by Pak forces in Baluchistan.
    • PM's ministers, bureaucrats split over Pakistan reference
    • India signals more muscular approach with rival neighbour
    PM Modi during the 70th Independence Day function at Red Fort. (PTI file photo)

    NEW DELHI: When Prime Minister Narendra Modi met top aides to prepare last week's annual Independence Day address+ , some senior bureaucrats warned him against mentioning Baluchistan, arch-rival Pakistan's restive southwestern province.

    Referring to Baluchistan in such a prominent speech would be a highly unusual move bound to ratchet up tensions between the nuclear-armed neighbours more used to trading barbs over Kashmir, the cause of two of their three wars.

    According to a senior official at the meeting in early August, the more hawkish politicians in the room, angered by what they saw as Pakistan's recent trouble-making in Kashmir+ , thought differently, and so did Modi.


    By siding with the hawks, and including Baluchistan in his address


    That dims prospects of bringing the bitter rivals closer together to reduce economic pain and the risk of more violence, an issue that will be high on US Secretary of State John Kerry's agenda when he lands in New Delhi on Monday for a three-day visit.

    "The bureaucrats suggested that talking about Baluchistan is a good idea but may be the Independence Day speech was not a good platform for it," said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the meeting's sensitivity.

    Defence minister Manohar Parrikar "rejected these ideas", while home minister Rajnath Singh "supported him (Parrikar) by saying we should do everything to silence Pakistan", this official said.

    Ministry for external affairs declined to comment on the debate about Modi's speech. His office, and the defence and home ministries, did not respond to requests for comment.

    Speaking from the ramparts of the 17th-century Red Fort in Old Delhi on Aug. 15, Modi thanked the Baluch people for their support after a number of separatist leaders published videos praising him for acknowledging their cause previously.

    He also lashed out at supporters of "terrorism", in a more familiar broadside against India's old foe.

    CROSSING THE RED LINE
    Pakistan has seized on Modi's speech as evidence that India has a hand in a decades-long Baluch separatist campaign, in which insurgents in the resource-rich yet impoverished region have launched sporadic attacks and demanded independence. India denies the charge.

    A senior foreign ministry official in Islamabad said Modi had " crossed the red line+ ".

    Indian officials said Modi's speech was designed to remind the world about alleged human rights abuses by Pakistani forces in Baluchistan, just as Pakistan accuses India of abusing civilians in the disputed region of Kashmir during recent unrest.


    But outside Modi's entourage, questions are being asked about what strategic reward, if any, India can hope to gain by raising the geopolitical stakes.

    "Politically, it's much less useful in terms of Pakistan using this as evidence of Indian meddling. It gives them ammunition," said Daniel Markey, a South Asia expert at Johns Hopkins University in Washington, referring to Modi's mention of Baluchistan.

    But he added: "There is a strategic utility in looking a little unhinged, in sending that message."

    A New Delhi-based diplomat from a major power with traditionally close ties to India said it will only escalate tension.

    DETERIORATING RELATIONS

    Relations between India and Pakistan have deteriorated since the killing+ of a separatist leader in Indian-ruled Kashmir on July 8 sparked the worst violence in the disputed territory in six years.

    At least 66 protesters and two security personnel have been killed and thousands wounded on both sides, according to official state figures.

    India blames Pakistan for failing to stop militants crossing the heavily militarised de facto border between them and attacking Indian security forces. Pakistan denies this.

    Two senior Indian officials said Modi had become frustrated with Pakistan's latest attempt to draw wide international attention to the Kashmir question and the current clampdown, and to take the matter to the United Nations.

    "Dealing with militancy is our internal issue and we will not tolerate any other country's interference," said one of the officials, from Modi's nationalist ruling party, who is closely involved in regional policy.

    At the August meeting, Parrikar, the defence minister, also said that by raising Baluchistan, Modi would be highlighting China's role in unrest in the region, said the official present.

    The reference to China reflects Indian unease at Beijing's backing of a $46 billion trade corridor running through land in northeast Pakistan that New Delhi claims, onward through Baluchistan to the port of Gwadar on the Arabian Sea coast.

    Some of the Baluch separatist leaders who praised Modi before his address worry that their battle for a homeland will become a political football between the South Asian neighbours.

    "If India's support is just a reaction to the politics and to Kashmir, then it could damage the political struggle," said Geneva-based Baloch Republican Party leader Brahamdagh Bugti.

    He said New Delhi had rejected his application for Indian asylum in 2007.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...pendence-Day-address/articleshow/53873173.cms
     
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  3. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    How India plans to use Indus Water Treaty to turn the heat on Pakistan

    NEW DELHI: Taking the offensive right into the heart of Pakistan, India on Monday reviewed the

    Indus Water Treaty+
    to explore possible ways to use its share of water of rivers flowing into Pakistan.

    " Blood and water cannot flow simultaneously+ ," Prime Minister Narendra Modi said on Monday as he chaired a review meeting of 56-year-old Indus Water Treaty during which it was decided that India will "exploit to the maximum" the water of Pakistan-controlled rivers, including Jhelum, as per the water-sharing pact.

    The review meeting on the Indus Water Treaty came as India weighed its options to hit back at Pakistan+ in the aftermath of the Uri attack+ that left 18 soldiers dead, triggering demands that the government scrap the water distribution pact to mount pressure on that country.

    Here are the three important ways New Delhi plans to use provisions in the Indus Water Treaty to turn the heat on Islamabad:

    1. Meetings of 'Permanent Indus Commission' suspended

    Official sources said the Indus commissioners will meet only in the absence of terrorism. These commissioners meet about twice a year and have met every year since the treaty was signed, even during the 1965, 1971 and Kargil wars.

    Implication Pakistan at a dead end. Here's how:

    * Treaty provides for three-stage grievance redress. Disputes first raised at meetings (two a year). If unresolved, dispute is referred to neutral expert World Bank appoints. If that too fails, sides can apply for arbitration by the UN's court of arbitration

    * If the first stage of dispute redressal is suspended, the other two steps cannot kick in. This leads to a dead end for Pakistan

    2. Restart Tulbul project

    India unilaterally suspended the Tulbul project (Islamabad calls it Wullar Barrage) in 1987 after Pakistan objected. The project was part of the composite dialogue, but the dialogue itself was junked in its earlier form by the Manmohan Singh government. The decision to review the suspension signalled the Modi government's intent to revive it irrespective of Pakistan's protests.

    Implication India gets to control Jhelum water, impact Pakistan agriculture

    * Project can create problems for Pakistan's triple-canal project that connects Jhelum-Chenab with Upper Bari Doab Canal

    * With a barrage, India controls release of water into Jhelum, which could trigger a flood or drought in POK and Pakistan. Serious implications for agriculture in Pakistan

    What reviving the Tulbul Project means

    * The Tulbul project is a "navigation lock-cum-control structure" at the mouth of the lake, located on the Jhelum river

    * It is a key intra-state channel to ferry state's goods & people. To sustain navigation through the year a minimum depth of water in the lake is necessary

    * The idea to ensure year-round navigation along the 20-km stretch from Anantnag to Srinagar and Baramulla, and on the 22 km-stretch between Sopore and Baramulla that becomes non-navigable in winter with water depth of only 2.5 ft

    * The project envisages water release from lake to maintain minimum draught of 4.5 feet in Jhelum


    * India had started constructing a 439 feet long barrage at the lake's mouth


    * Pakistan objected and construction was halted in 1987



    3. An inter-ministerial task force
    The government set up an inter-ministerial task force to look at India's usage of the waters from the western rivers. According to the treaty, India has unrestricted use of the eastern rivers (Ravi, Beas, Sutlej), but only 20% use of the western rivers. However, India is allowed water from these rivers for "domestic and non-consumptive use, hydropower and agriculture, subject to certain limits".



    Implication
    India grossly under-utilises its entitlement under the 1960-treaty where it can use all the waters of the Jhelum, Chenab and Indus

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...the-heat-on-Pakistan/articleshow/54544929.cms
     
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  4. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    India in no hurry to review Pakistan's MFN status, Indus Water Treaty; keeps options open
    Sat, 15 Oct 2016-07:50am

    Be it the Most Favoured Nation (MFN) status to Pakistan or the Indus waters treaty, India is treading slowly and cautiously on its terms of engagement with Pakistan. Highly placed government sources said while no decision had been taken on withdrawing either of these, New Delhi was keeping its options open.


    At a meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi just a few days ahead of the surgical strikes, commerce ministry officials placed all the facts before him on the MFN status given to Pakistan. The Prime Minister merely heard them, sources said. In the case of the Indus water treaty also, all the facts have been placed before him.

    The meeting was held at a time when India was pulling out all the stops to wage a psychological war against Pakistan, after the Uri attack which killed 18 Soldiers. From the "we will choose the time and place" for retaliation to MFN status and Indus water treaty, the message that New Delhi was sending to Islamabad was that it would not hesitate from taking any step that could hurt Pakistan.

    While there is acknowledgement in the government that withdrawing the MFN status would not hurt Pakistan much but at the same time push India to invoke a "security exception" clause in the General Agreement on Trade and Tariff (GATT), a final decision would be a political one. Sources said that if a decision is taken, then notwithstanding any international pressure, the government will go ahead with it. The Modi regime had exhibited its resolve to take a tough stand in the face of international pressure when it refused to sign the World Trade Organisation's (WTO) Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA) in 2014, till it got assurances on its food security issues.

    "On the issue of withdrawal of MFN from Pakistan, strictly speaking, that has not yet been discussed," news agencies quoted commerce and industry minister Nirmala Sitharaman as saying.

    The sources indicated that after the meeting with the Prime Minister on the MFN status with Pakistan, there was no major movement on the issue. They also added that all options were being kept open and the last word was yet to be said, a message that would keep Pakistan on tenterhooks.

    However, the clamour within the country for taking such steps as part of the exercise to isolate the neighbouring country has waned, particularly after the surgical strikes, which has been seen as a befitting reply to Pakistan.

    On the Wagah-Attari border, where Indian trucks went with perishable items like food items and vegetables besides coffee, tea, spices and cotton and Pakistani trucks came with goods like cement and copper articles, organic chemicals and sulphur the exchange of goods on the Wagah-Attari border is a painstaking manual process, making it difficult to transfer too many items in a day.


    While the official India-Pakistan bilateral trade figure stood at $2.6 billion in 2015-16, a lot of Indian items enter Pakistan via Dubai. This is another reason why the government is in no hurry to call off the MFN status to Pakistan.


    What has peeved India further is that two decades after India gave Pakistan MFN status, a non-discriminatory trade policy between countries giving specific advantages like reduced tariff on imported goods, the neighbouring country is yet to reciprocate.


    http://www.dnaindia.com/india/repor...tatus-to-pakistan-keeps-it-open-ended-2264203
     
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  5. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    What Iran and Pakistan Want from the Afghans: Water
    Iran and Pakistan depend on river basins that flow out of Afghanistan. And Afghans are growing paranoid that its neighbors are trying to take more water than the country can afford to give

    With a vast, empty desert as a backdrop, the militants recorded the execution of Khan Wali on video. As someone held a camera, the others encircled the condemned man to read out his sentence. “This is not brutality — this is justice,” declared one of the executioners, who sported a black turban and a shaggy beard. “I swear to God that killing him with an 82-mm mortar is not enough. But the rest of our mujahedin would not agree on my recommendation — to kill him in a way that all can take part in the act.”

    And so it was decided to shoot Khan Wali with the 82-mm mortar. They forced him to kneel 36 m away from the portable cannon, a type often used in small battles in the war-torn country. A militant positioned behind the weapon then set it off; a massive thumping sound was followed by celebratory cries of Allahu akbar — God is great. “Be careful, don’t get any blood on your clothes,” said one voice as the other men, after jubilantly hugging one another, rushed to poke at Khan Wali’s flesh splattered on the ground. “I enjoyed this very much,” said one.



    What was Khan Wali’s crime? He was protecting one of Afghanistan’s most important resources: water. Khan Wali led a 60-man semiofficial militia tasked with defending the Machalgho dam in eastern Paktia province. Already two years behind schedule because of security concerns, the dam would irrigate about 16,000 hectares of land and produce 800 KW of electricity once completed. The government had pledged that if Khan Wali held his ground for two months, he and his men would receive weapons and cash. But Khan Wali lasted only 20 days into the mission.

    His remains were recovered eight days after his savage execution, his nephew Agha Jan told TIME. His upper body was completely in pieces. “We recognized him from the tattoo he had and the shoes he had been wearing — his name was tattooed on his hand since childhood.” The video of the brutal execution, which took place in mid-2011, was shared with journalists months later and uploaded to YouTube.

    “With such bravery, he had tried to protect the dam — and they killed him so brutally,” says Rohullah Samoon, a senior aide and spokesman of the governor of Paktia.

    Water is a critical issue in Afghanistan — and for countries like Iran and Pakistan that are dependent on four of the five river basins that flow out of Afghanistan to irrigate their territories. Meanwhile, though the Afghans currently have enough water for their own needs, any perception of abundance is illusory, experts say. Indeed, the availability of water per capita is expected to decline by 50% in the next three decades, according to a U.N.-funded report. Afghanistan’s extremely weak infrastructure and one of the lowest water-storage capacities in the world means that large parts of the country cannot make use of their own water resources. Frequent droughts, localized and national, further affect the population, causing food shortages and migration. In 2008, for example, wheat production declined by 40% to 55% because of lack of precipitation.

    (VIDEO: Iran: Life Under the Sanctions)

    Water is key to strengthening the foundations of Afghanistan’s mainly agricultural economy. But only about 5% of the massive international investment and aid in the past decade went to the water sector, according to the U.N. report. And, critics say, too much of that went to ad hoc small dams and schemes that had no long-term vision.

    The geopolitical factors are such that Afghans are paranoid that both Iran and Pakistan are sabotaging their efforts to build dams and control their hydro resources — though the evidence is circumstantial and speculative at best. For example, there were broad hints that elements in Pakistan may have contributed to the death of Khan Wali. Says one local official in Paktia: “The price that our neighbors pay for a human life around here? It’s 50,000 Pakistani rupees [about $500].”

    It is true, however, that Pakistan’s energy crisis has furthered its dependence on Afghan water. Iran, the only country that Afghanistan has a water treaty with, is now taking up to 70% more water than agreed to, according to officials, and has built infrastructure on the incoming water without Afghanistan’s consent. If Afghanistan tries to build major dams to hold more of its own water, both Pakistan and Iran are likely to object and to hold up the projects. Indeed, because diplomatic objections can create bureaucratic bottlenecks, major aid donors have increasingly shied away from funding water projects in Afghanistan.



    An official at the Afghan Ministry of Energy and Water claims that the World Bank called off funding for a major project after it learned that it required clearance from Iran. The World Bank would not comment, saying only that it did not have projects in Afghanistan’s water sector. “I think our neighbors have better relations with the major donors — such as the World Bank,” the official said accusingly. They lobby to get bigger loans for themselves but create hurdles on the way of such projects in Afghanistan, he says.

    “Out of 57 billion cu m of average annual rivers flow, only less than 30% is consumed in Afghanistan; the remaining part of water flows out into neighboring countries,” says Sayed Sharif Shobair, a water expert with several years of experience with national and international agencies in Afghanistan. “Attracting investment in the water sector from donor agencies may require us to resolve transboundary water issues first.”

    “The Afghan government, every now and then, announces the building of 20 dams or so. But it remains only plans on paper because they can rarely gather the funding for it,” says Khwaga Kakar, an independent researcher who spent two years on the U.N.-funded report on Afghanistan’s water resources. “There is a disconnect between ‘we plan to do’ and ‘what the donors are giving us.’”

    The anxieties about Iranian and Pakistani meddling are exemplified by the speculation around the long-stalled Salma dam, being built by India in the province of Herat in western Afghanistan, which borders Iran. The dam has the potential to irrigate nearly 75,000 hectares and produce 42 MW of electricity. However, the project is already four years behind schedule. Its cost has doubled and is expected to rise by another 50%. Some Afghan officials are astonished that Indian engineers, who have built highways in Afghanistan in record time, are taking so long to complete the dam. They hypothesize that Iranian diplomatic meddling has caused the delays.

    (MORE: Why We’re Stuck with Pakistan)

    The Indians, however, deny it. “Afghans tell us that Iran has created issues, but we haven’t had to talk to Iran about it because we haven’t had evidence linking them to insecurity there,” says Gautam Mukhopadhaya, the Indian ambassador to Afghanistan, blaming the delay on cost escalation. “The Salma dam will be completed, no question about that.”

    Lack of data is the biggest hurdle, says senior Afghan diplomat Enayatullah Nabiel, who worked on the transboundary water issues for several years. And many Afghans look suspiciously upon the Iranian experts who moved in to fill the expertise gap by setting up the research center inside Afghanistan’s Water Ministry tasked with gathering information and data on the country’s water resources. The Iranian experts provide what other countries and companies no longer do because of the fragile security within Afghanistan. But the result is increased suspicion. Says Nabiel: “The fact that Iranians are involved in running the research center inside the Ministry of Water is very dangerous — they have loyalty to their own country.”

    Some analysts say Afghanistan — given its already grave security issues — should seek nonconfrontational methods of solving its cross-border water problems. “It might be good if Afghanistan could move in some specific cases from water sharing to river-benefit sharing,” says Shobair. “In Kunar River, for example, joint hydropower production could be one idea to look into. Afghanistan could convince Pakistan that is for their good as well.”

    But that process requires protracted negotiations with the neighbors. Margaret Vick, who advised the Ministry of Water and Energy on cross-border water laws, says the government has capable diplomats and negotiators but has to use them to deal with other crises. She adds that the ministry continues to have other deficiencies that have not been dealt with in decades. “Pre-Soviet invasion,” she explains, “the government had an engineering branch to work on water and other infrastructure issues of national importance.” Today, however, she says, “it’s the depth of engineering capability that has not yet recovered.”

    http://world.time.com/2012/12/02/what-iran-and-pakistan-want-from-the-afghans-water/
     
  6. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    India out to damage Pakistan’s water interests on Kabul river

    ISLAMABAD: Afghanistan’s authorities with the help of Indian experts have completed the feasibilities and detailed engineering of 12 hydro-power projects with capacity to generate 1,177MW of electricity to be built on the river Kabul.

    If the 12 projects get completed, they will store 4.7 million acre feet of water squeezing the flow in the river reaching Pakistan.

    India, which also helped Afghanistan in repairing the Friendship Dam (Salma Dam) on the river Chishti-e-Sharif in Herat province, is already erecting the hydro-power projects on the Chenab, Jhelum and Indus with an objective to get the capacity to maneuver water flows destined to reach Pakistan and is now active to squeeze the water artery coming from Afghanistan.

    According to a document exclusively available with The News, Indian experts have completed the feasibilities and detailed engineering of the 12 projects to be built on the river Kabul. The authorities in Kabul after completing the tendering process will be initiating construction of multi-purpose water projects on the tributaries of the river Kabul with assistance from the international community. India plans to assist Afghanistan in this initiative, which will adversely impact on Pakistan. The documents also show that the World Bank will provide funding for the 12 dams that will cost $7.079 billion.

    The most ironic part of the whole episode is that Pakistan’s authorities have failed to develop water uses on the river Kabul as they failed to build the Kalabagh Dam at the site on the Indus where the river Kabul merges with the river Indus.

    Similarly, Pakistan’s authorities have also failed to construct the Munda Dam on the river Kabul. The failure in developing water uses has weakened Pakistan’s case against the resolve of Afghanistan to build the 12 hydro-power projects on the river Kabul.

    The documents unveil that four hydro-power projects will be constructed in the Punjshir sub-basin. These include the $332 million Totumdara project which will generate 200MW of electricity and have water storage capacity of 332,510 acres feet; the $1.174b Barak project which will generate 100MW of electricity and store 429,830 acres feet of water; $1.078 billion Panjshir (100MW) project with the capacity to store 105,4300 acres feet of water; and the $607 million Baghdara (210MW) project with the capacity to store 324,400 acres feet of water.

    In the Logur Upper Kabul sub-basin on the river Kabul four more dams are to be built which include the $72 million Haijana project (72MW) with water storage capacity of 178,420 acres feet; $207 million Kajab (15MW) project with water storage capacity of 324,400 acres feet; the $356 million Tangi Wadag (56MW) project with capacity to store 283,850 acres feet; and $51m Gat (86MW) project with water storage capacity of 405,500 acres feet. Four more dams will be built in the Lower Kabul sub-basin, including the $442 million Sarobi project (210MW) with the capacity to store 324,400 acres feet of water; the $1.434 billion Laghman project (1251MW) with water storage capacity of 233,568 acres feet; and the $1.094 billion Konar (A) (94.8MW) and Kama projects (11.5MW).

    Pakistan and Afghanistan currently share nine rivers with annual flows of about 18.3 million acres feet (MAF) of which the river Kabul accounts for 16.5MAF, while River Chitral, which originates from Pakistan, contributes about 8.5MAF. After it enters Afghanistan this river is called River Kunar. It joins the river Kabul near Jalalabad and then re-enters Pakistan.

    However, the documents say: “Ninety percent of Afghanistan’s land area is located in the five river basins namely: Panj-Amu Darya River Basin, Northern River Basin, Harirud-Murghab Basin, Helmand River Basin and river Kabul basin. The total storage capacity of these dams is around 4.7 million acre feet. It is further estimated that the planned dams will utilise 0.5 MAF water to irrigate additional 14,000 acres of land.

    “Afghanistan has the right to utilise water from the river Kabul as the total flow of Kabul River is 21,000 million cubic meter. But the river Kunar, which contributes 15,000 million cubic meter to the river Kabul, originates from Pakistan.

    “In the absence of major dams in Pakistan, it is feared that Pakistan will have to buy electricity from Afghanistan, which is the underlying purpose of the above mentioned plan of the Afghan government in collaboration with India.”

    However, Syed Mehr Ali Shah, Joint Secretary (Water Wing) in the Ministry of Water and Power said that all the water uses of river Kabul are 100 percent committed up to Kotri Barrage. Pakistan is the country which is facing water deficit and has total water flows in its rivers and dams stand at 137 MAF and these water uses have been developed for the last many decades and no upper riparian country like Afghanistan can utilize the committed water uses of Pakistan.

    Mr Shah said that Afghanistan could utilize 2.5 MAF water for irrigation purposes at the maximum. However, at Warsak, Pakistan has committed water flows of river Kabul of 16-17 MAF out of which 8-8.5 MAF water comes from the river Chitral which generates from Pakistan. “No doubt it is the failure of the authorities and political leadership of not building the Kalabagh Dam and Munda Dam, but if the said dams are not built, even then Pakistan’s water uses of river Kabul are established and Pakistan’s case is very strong if needed to move any international forum,” he claimed.

    When asked about the huge quantum of 36 MAF water that went down the drain during the flood season, Mr Shah said that it was flood water which could not be stored. However, in the remaining months, Pakistan faces the water deficit and the Kabul water uses are 100 percent committed in Pakistan. He said since there is no water treaty with Afghanistan, but under the international convention Pakistan has the right to utilise 17 MAF water in river Kabul as the said water uses are committed in lower riparian country. Likewise Afghanistan uses 1.8 MAF which is its developed water rights. Both the countries under the international convention are bound to continue to utilise their developed water uses. To a question Mr Shah said that Munda is being built on Sawat basin which is Pakistan’s own basin.

    Talking about the 4.7 MAF water to be stored in 12 hydropower project being built on river Kabul, Mr Shah said that it was not correct as the water storage would not be more than 2 MAF. However, in the initial filling, the said projects may store the water more than 2 MAF, but after that projects will not be able to store more than 2 MAF. However, the Afghanistan if tries its best, it can use 2.5 MAF water from river Kabul to irrigate its plain lands at the maximum.

    https://www.thenews.com.pk/print/125490-India-out-to-damage-Pakistans-water-interests-on-Kabul-river
     
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  7. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Regional Isolation:

    Pakistan Isolated. After India, 3 More Nations Pull Out Of SAARC Summit
    New Delhi:
    Highlights
    1. Bangladesh, Bhutan, Afghanistan opt out of SAARC summit: sources
    2. India pulled out of the summit yesterday over 'cross-border attacks'
    3. The decision is a key move in India's global campaign to isolate Pak
    After India said Prime Minister Narendra Modi will not travel to Islamabad for the regional SAARC summit in November, three other members - Bangladesh, Afghanistan and Bhutan - have also pulled out of the meet, isolating host Pakistan.

    The SAARC or South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation summit cannot take place even if one of the eight members withdraws.

    http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/afte...t-of-saarc-summit-in-pakistan-sources-1467361
     
  8. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Naela Quadri Baloch seeks India's help for forming 'Balochistan govt in exile'



    President World Baloch Women's Forum and prominent Baloch nationalist leader Naela Quadri Baloch on Monday said the Balochistan Freedom Movement (BFM) activists want to form an "Azad Balochistan government in exile" and they want India, Afghanistan and other SAARC nations to support their government.

    "We want to form an Azad Balochistan government in exile and we want India, Afghanistan and other SAARC nations to support the Bloach Government in Exile," she told ANI.



    When asked about her (and BFM activists') expectations from India, Quadri, who landed in New Delhi after holding a conference with Afghanistan leaders in Kabul, said, "India should give us space and office to establish the government in exile. Besides, we express our deep gratitude to Modiji (Prime Minister Narendra Modi) and (external Affairs Minister) Shushma Swaraj for raising their voices on the Baloch issue. We are also thankful to the Indian people and the Indian media."

    "The Bloch Freedom Movement is going ahead successfully, the struggle is on, and we need your help," she added.

    Asked if things had changed since Prime Minister Modi raised the Balochistan issue, she said, "Things are changing rapidly; things are changing rapidly at the international level - you have seen it at the United Nations, you have seen that other countries are coming to support the Baloch issue internationally."

    Demanding the release of Baloch Students Organisation - Azad (BSO-Azad) spokesperson Shabir Baloch, who was "picked up" by Pakistani Security Forces during the Gwarkop military operation on October 4, Quadri said, "Shabir Baloch was picked up; before him Abdul Wahid Baloch (Baloch poet, writer and social activist) was picked up; and even before them and 30,000 Baloch activists were picked up, and tortured-mutilated bodies of some of them were found recently. The picked-up Baloch leaders and activists should be freed at the earliest."

    As Cyril Almeida, a columnist and reporter for the Dawn, has been barred by the Pakistan Government from leaving the country after he reported on a suspected rift between civilian and military leaderships, Naela Quadri said, "Pakistan has become 'graveyard' for journalists.

    Wishing the people of India 'Happy Dussehra', she said, "May Goddess Durga gives us strength that we could get Balochistan freed.
    http://www.business-standard.com/ar...balochistan-govt-in-exile-116101100508_1.html
     
  9. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Does India have a Plan ‘B’ (Balochistan)?


    Balochistan has, for some years now, become something of a buzzword in India to score some debating points over Pakistan. In the process, India has done great disservice to the Baloch who are waging a lonely battle against the might of the Pakistani state. Unwittingly, every time any Indian mentions the ‘B’ word, the Pakistanis get an alibi and an excuse, even a degree of legitimacy, to ramp up their savage military campaign to crush nationalist aspirations of the

    Baloch. In a sense, it’s a double-whammy for the Baloch: they face the brunt of a brutal Pakistani crackdown without getting any material, or even moral, assistance from India. Clearly, if empty talk is all that India can do for the Baloch, then instead of helping them, Indians actually end up harming them.

    Broadly, there are four possible reasons for India to get interested in the issue of Balochistan. The first relates to what we have already been doing, which is that we bring up Balochistan in debates with the Pakistanis because it makes them squirm. Balochistan is after all Pakistan’s soft-underbelly, and if there was anything like conscience in international relations, then Pakistan would have been in a dog-house for the crimes of humanity they have committed and continue to visit upon the Baloch. The Pakistanis, despite brazening it out and blaming India for their troubles in Balochistan – the drama over the alleged Indian spy is just the latest in a series of bizarre accusations that the Pakistanis level against India – know the truth about the horrors being inflicted upon the Baloch and find themselves on the defensive when these are pointed out to them in debates. But the vicarious pleasure isn’t policy. While Balochistan might come handy to us to sock it to the Pakistanis every time they mention Kashmir, it doesn’t do anything for the Baloch.

    A second reason for India to get involved in Balochistan could be as a payback for all the terrorism, insurgency and separatism that Pakistan has sponsored and supported in India. Balochistan can serve as an excellent leverage that India has over Pakistan, and as such, can become a negotiating tool to make Pakistan back off from what they are doing inside India. At the very least, India can settle scores in Balochistan for anything the Pakistanis throw at us in Kashmir or elsewhere in India. But in a broader strategic context, the tit-for-tat policy is neither here nor there. At best, it has only a marginal utility because it really doesn’t change the strategic environment in any meaningful way. More importantly, it doesn’t have a long shelf-life because it turns off the people who feel they are being used as pawns who will be sacrificed to serve someone else’s interest.


    A third reason for backing the Baloch independence movement could be because it is the right thing to do, a moral imperative and obligation that must be fulfilled. Balochistan is currently seeing the fifth and longest and bloodiest uprising against Pakistani rule. This latest rebellion can be traced back to around 2001-02 when reports started filtering in of rocket attacks on Quetta cantonment, sabotage actions, target killing of ‘settlers’ and law enforcement officials. After the killing of the octogenarian Baloch leader Nawab Akbar Bugti in 2006, the rebellion changed gears and became more intense.

    Like the previous four, the fifth uprising was fuelled by deprivation, discrimination, marginalisation and exploitation of the Baloch by the Punjab-dominated Pakistan. Thousands have been mercilessly killed and thousands more have ‘disappeared’ – kidnapped, tortured and later killed by death squads backed by the Pakistan authorities or in many cases run by Pakistani security personnel. The media is muzzled, and any local Baloch journalist intrepid enough or foolish enough to report honestly is invariably intimidated and occasionally ‘silenced’. Newspapers have been shut down, internet is strictly monitored, TV channels have limited access — in short, it’s a police state. To make ‘good’ Muslims of the secular Baloch, terror groups like the Lashkar-e-Taiba have been given a run of the place to infuse the virus of Islamic extremism into the Baloch society.

    In the name of development, mega projects aimed to colonise the Baloch even more, and reduce them to the status of ‘Red Indians’, have been started.
    The much vaunted Gwadar port project has made the local Baloch aliens in their own city, ruined their habitat and their livelihoods, and introduced apartheid-type rules to keep them out of the way of the Chinese overlords.


    It is in this context that it becomes a moral duty of not just India but also other right thinking countries to support the struggle of the Baloch.
    That cynical strategic compulsions and calculations often guide the policy of countries is manifest in Balochistan, where the ‘thekedars’ of human rights in the West haven’t uttered a word against the Pakistanis. Though organisations like Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International have published reports on the state of affairs in Balochistan, they haven’t really agitated, much less lobbied, over the issue. In other words, they paid lip service to what was happening in Balochistan lest they be accused of hypocrisy and double-standards.

    The fourth reason to back the Baloch is because an independent Balochistan fit into our grand strategic calculation. Not only does it cut Pakistan down to size but more importantly robs Pakistan of the only area which actually lends Pakistan any geo-strategic importance. If anything, Balochistan’s strategic relevance lies outside Pakistan and not inside it. Its geographical location will make Balochistan a strategic pivot in the region. What is more, the secular character of Baloch society, will make beacon of progressive values in a region where fires of jihadism are wreaking havoc.

    Clearly, if India has to support the Baloch, it must be because it is the right thing to do and because it makes strategic sense. But if India does indeed decide to do so, then it must persist until the achievement of the objective. Unfortunately, India is notorious for flip-flops in policy and half-way house solutions. Worse, India is seen as an unreliable partner which leaves people in the lurch to cut a deal. This is precisely what India did with the Baloch in the 1970s, so much so that top leaders who considered India a friend were refused visas because the then government wanted to woo the Pakistani military dictator Gen Zia-ul-Haq. In the end, India ended with worst of both worlds: it lost the trust of the Baloch without getting anything from Zia.


    Apart from mounting a robust diplomatic and publicity campaign to highlight the issue of Balochistan before international audiences, India must also educate itself on Balochistan before taking any plunge
    . At the political level the ignorance about Balochistan in India is astounding. During the parliamentary debate on the Sharm-el-Sheikh fiasco, the JDU leader Sharad Yadav spoke passionately about Balochistan and then linked it up with Khan Abdul Gaffar Khan! Unless we become better informed about Balochistan we will not know the enormous pitfalls and complexities that will confront us if we were to get involved there.

    These include the socio-political dynamics in which tribal Sardars and even political leaders who don nationalist robes in opposition take no time to behave like Quislings and sell their people and their own souls for money and positions. The absence of any coherent national movement which is spearheaded by any one party or organisation is one of the most glaring weakness in the fight of the Baloch for self-determination. In other words, while the passion of freedom burns deeply, the politics that can guide that passion towards its objective is all messed up. Finally, there is sensitivity of neighbouring countries like Iran (which has its own Baloch problem which is not just ethnic but also sectarian) that has to be taken into account, because the logistics of providing material support will depend on cooperation of Balochistan’s neighbours.

    As is our wont, we can delude ourselves that merely empty rhetoric on Balochistan will be enough to win this war. That is a folly best avoided. A bigger folly would, however, be to jump in headlong and then leave the job half done. This time, if India starts something, it must see it to the end without getting into any quid pro quo deals with the devils.

    http://www.freepressjournal.in/analysis/does-india-have-a-plan-b-balochistan-sushant-sareen/824487
     
  10. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Baloch leader Brahumdagh Bugti meets Indian authorities for political asylum
    Balochistan Republican Party leader Brahumdagh Bugti on Tuesday met authorities in Geneva to discuss the process for his political asylum in India. Bugti, who is currently living in exile in Switzerland, is leading the Baloch movement against Pakistan.

    Bugti, who spoke to Indian embassy officials on Monday over telephone from Geneva, has been living in Geneva for the last six years, and his application for political asylum in Switzerland is “pending with the Swiss authorities”.

    Bugti, grandson of slain Baloch leader Akbar Bugti, went into exile in Afghanistan after the death of his grandfather in 2006. He moved to Switzerland in 2010 and has been living there since.



    Bugti also said that the Baloch leaders have decided to file criminal cases against Pakistani army generals and China at the International Court of Justice. “Will take China to International Court of Justice with the help of Bangladesh, Afghanistan and India,” said Bugti.


    He also said his Baloch Republican Party has decided to approach the International Criminal Court against Pakistani army generals.


    Bugti said Baloch Republican Party has also decided to file case against China at the International Court of Justice and to do it, the party will approach India, Afghanistan and Bangladesh for help.

    http://indianexpress.com/article/in...ties-in-geneva-for-political-asylum-in-india/
     
  11. Abhijat

    Abhijat Regular Member

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    @sorcerer , good initiative .

    Would help in undermining capability of "Deep state" actors . And would also be a source of following, "comprehensive national power" of India.
     
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  12. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Now Is the Time to Hit Pakistan With Sanctions


    On October 7, Dawn, a Pakistani based newspaper, published an article detailing the anxiousness of the inner sanctum of Pakistan’s civilian controlled government. A debate is raging within Pakistan regarding the country’s tacit support of militant groups.

    The article titled, “Act against militants or face international isolation, civilians tell military,” detailed plans articulated by the civilian government to military and defense bureaus of the need to act on banned militant groups operating in the country.

    The decisive action ordered by Islamabad to combat insurgent groups operating in the country followed a high-level meeting chaired by Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif in which Foreign Secretary Aizaz Chaudhry presented to high ranking members of government that Pakistan’s diplomatic talking points were failing to sway the international community and that Pakistan faced potential international isolation.


    As Afghanistan limps on from one its bloodiest fighting seasons that has witnessed almost 4,500 casualties from March to August, many fingers have pointed at Pakistan’s support of Taliban militants for much of the instability and discord ravaging the countryside.


    Five of Afghanistan’s provincial capitals are under threat of collapse, and, on Tuesday, Afghan forces struggling to repel Taliban advances around Lashkar Gah were massacred while orchestrating a negotiated tactical retreat; reports indicate that 100 Afghan forces were killed in the ambush.

    U.S. forces were rapidly deployed on Wednesday to assist Afghan security forces as they attempted to push back Taliban gains near the entrance of Farah city, the provincial capital of Farah.

    Haroon Chakhansuri, a spokesman for President Ashraf Ghani, blamed Pakistan for much of violence in remarks to The New York Times, “We can see there is a lot of truth and evidence — in the examples of fighting in Uruzgan and Kunduz — that terrorist groups and their operations are led by foreigners and generals, and they are receiving military and financial support from outside Afghanistan,” he said. “The way this war is managed, it shows that this is done by experts. This is very clear.”

    Over the last several months, the international community has stepped up efforts to pressure Islamabad into ending its support of militant groups. Highlighting its displeasure with Pakistan, the U.S. canceled sales of its F-16 fighter jets to Pakistan, and withheld $300 million dollars in U.S. assistance earmarked for allies combating terrorism around the globe.

    Despite Washington’s signals to Islamabad, Pakistan has continued to bloody Kabul through proxy agents — namely the Haqqani Network, Pakistan’s” veritable arm,” and much of the international community sees Pakistan’s hallmark on the terrorist attack on the Indian military camp in Uri, Kashmir that killed 17 Indian soldiers in September.

    Pakistan may be feeling the pressure with Tuesday’s arrest of three prominent Taliban leaders including Mullah Nanai who operated as Mullah Akhtar Mansour’s intelligence chief. Local sources have indicated that the arrests were a result of the Taliban’s refusal to enter peace talks with the Afghan government.

    However, Afghan officials are skeptical of Pakistan’s sincerity on the crackdown; Dawa Khan Minapal, President Ashraf Ghani’s deputy spokesman stated, “Pakistani government has not informed the Afghan government over its claims of arresting several Taliban members; therefore, Kabul cannot verify the credibility of the report.”

    Pakistan has in the past initiated high-level operations to flush out militants in an attempt to sway skeptical minds of its seriousness to combat jihadi groups in the country. In 2014, Pakistan launched a major military operation named Zarb-e-Azb in North Waziristan in an effort to combat militant groups hiding out in Pakistan’s frontier region. However, many analysts have indicated that Pakistan used the operation to protect groups that it deemed important to its strategic efforts, allowing many Taliban factions to flee the area.

    The international community should not take Pakistan’s carrot at face value. The Global Competitiveness Report 2016-17 indicates that Pakistan is currently the least competitive economy in South Asia and ranked 122 out of 138 countries overall. The erosion of Pakistan’s industrial base and a reliance on imports has led to Pakistan’s poor competitiveness in the region.

    Pakistan’s economic vulnerability has made it dependent on Chinese investments, chiefly the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor as its only shimmering light in a bleak economic forecast.

    If the United States and the international community want serious concessions from Pakistan, a credible threat of sanctions must be on the table. As the international community has begun to sour on Pakistan’s support of jihadi groups, the time is ripe to put sanctions on the table; it is time to hit Pakistan where it is most vulnerable.

    http://thediplomat.com/2016/10/now-is-the-time-to-hit-pakistan-with-sanctions/
     
  13. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Thanks..Lets keep updating it all information which formulates to containment of the retard state of pakistan from spasms!!!
     
  14. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    PM Modi brings up sanctions against Pakistan at world forums


    The pressure is on Pakistan as it was never before— not even when Osama bin Laden was discovered hiding in Abbottabad or after 26/11 in India. Never before has the Prime Minister of India brought up the need for declaring Pakistan a terrorist state and bringing sanctions against it, at major public forums. He gave two warnings to Pakistan in five days—first brought up at the G20 and then at the Asean Summit.

    In addition, two warnings have been made to Pakistan by Kerry and then by Obama’s US State Dept spokesman that Pakistan has to stop supporting terror outfits on its soil. In a recent Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing in the USA, Bob Corker the Chairman, accused Pakistan’s military and intelligence service of duplicity for providing safe haven to the Haqqani leadership despite the country’s stated commitment to target them. He said that far from stabilizing Afghanistan they are harbouring people who are intent on destabilizing it.

    Senator Ben Cardin said that US ties with Pakistan were “very challenging.” And added that Pakistan has been “very selective in going after terrorist networks, in particular the Haqqani network and the LeT. We have problems with Pakistan.”

    For the first time since independence we have a pragmatic Prime Minister. He first tried soft diplomacy and when that did not work he has gone for the jugular. This has at least brought to the attention of the world facts that 24/7 cycle of news often puts on the back burner. Now if India keeps up the drumbeat that Pakistan is a terror state and actively supports terror with its neighbours whether it is Afghanistan or India for its own nefarious purpose, the international community will listen. The more we take up Baluchistan as a major human rights issue and Gilgit/Baltistan including PoK, the more we put Pakistan on the back foot.

    It is surprising that with all the acts of war that have been initiated by Pakistan on India from the Parliament attack to bomb blasts in many states to Kargil, to 26/11 and now Hafiz Saeed openly speaking about supporting militants and stone throwers in Kashmir, that we took so long to read them the riot act. This made Pakistan even bolder. They think we were cowards and will forever turn the other cheek but this time PM Modi is giving them the tough treatment and this is how it should be.

    Two- years into his tenure our Prime Minister says enough is enough. We will not countenance this for another day. The Indian people apart from the Left, the Congress and Pakistan lovers all want a strong leader to tell Pakistan:

    “We will not take your bleeding from a thousand cuts anymore, we will tell the world what you are doing in Baluchistan and Pakistan occupied Kashmir and we will bring out the truth of what is happening in Kashmir to the world. You have funded this from 1989 to now and all we wanted was peace. We will also tell the world what you have done in Gilgit/Baltistan and Baluchistan where no elections are ever held and the populations are terrorized and killed or simply disappear.”

    Not one country in the G20 meet spoke up for Pakistan when Modi clearly implied that in our neighbourhood we have a country that exports terror. Another massive terror attack like 26/11 will clearly put Pakistan in the dock. The US has been putting pressure on Pakistan to bring the preparatory of the attack to justice but little has been achieved.

    I have written before on my blog and I will say it again: What if America had Pakistan as a neighbour? I said they would have simply blown it into the dark ages or put up their own puppet head of state to jump at their command as they have done in many countries. They did it in several countries in Latin America and Central America. They did it all over the Middle East. They tried to do it in Iraq and as the world knows it went horribly bad.

    In South Asia, India is their only hope and if the next President of America does not realize it than we will have to place all our cards before the international community who are already fed up with Islamic terror.

    China plays both ways since they want their port in the Arabian Sea but also have to deal with Islamic terror. In their case there is no question of Amnesty International reading them their Human Rights Obligations. They just kill or imprison the Muslims they suspect.

    They will only have problems if Pakistan disintegrates and because they know this they support it at every forum so that their 46 billion dollar road and access to Gwadar is not compromised. In a recent article I read that China already owns Pakistan but Pakistan does not know it yet. This would be ironical but in keeping with China’s interests in the region.

    Tarek Fatah and Hussain Haqqani both leading Pakistanis have written and spoken up on Pakistan’s terror strategy and the army and the ISI. Christine Fair a significant US voice has also laid bare the Pakistani Army’s duplicitous games. Recently, at terrorism conference in Jaipur, where India’s home minister was also present Fatah said, “Disengage with Pakistan completely. No talks, no visits, no trade.”

    He feels that peaceniks in India have completely misread Pakistan’s intentions and Pakistan simply can’t be trusted. A country that gave and still gives a safe haven to Mullah Omar and Hafiz Saeed, all terrorists have been exposed time and again as a state sanctioning terror. Saeed is allowed to openly say at rallies that Kashmir will be a Pakistani state and he will not stop till it is. Pakistani authorities not only encourage this but give him the protection and support he needs at his rallies. This is the man who was responsible for 26/11 and yet there are some in Indians who want Aman Ki Asha and talks with Pakistan!


    Fatah said, “End the ridiculous ‘Aman Ki Aasha’ that has been a one-way traffic of ISI aunties coming to India and running circles around it.”:pound:


    Mani Shankar Aiyar is a big proponent of this and has had the gall to go to Pakistan and on TV say that India needs its help to remove the present government. In any other country, he would have been jailed for sedition.

    We need to be tough with Pakistan not only for the Islamization and militancy they have exported and paid for in Kashmir but also because its army and ISI will not stop their shenanigans against India unless a lot more pressure is brought on them and sanctions on a terror state would be one way of doing it.

    http://blogs.timesofindia.indiatime...p-sanctions-against-pakistan-at-world-forums/
     
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  15. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    India to nail Pakistan's lie on LeT funding at international meet
    • India will look to corner Pakistan at a weeklong discussion on financing of terrorism in Paris
    • Free run given to banned outfits like Lashkar-e-Taiba, Jamaat-ud-Dawa in Pakistan will be brought up

    NEW DELHI: When delegates from 190 countries, the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), United Nations and multilateral agencies sit together from Sunday in Paris for a weeklong discussion on financing of terrorism, the Indian representatives will turn the spotlight on the free run given to banned outfits like Lashkar-e-Taiba and its UN co-listed entities Jamaat-ud-Dawa (JuD) and Falah-i-Insaniyat Foundation (FIF) for raising funds for terrorism in the name of charity in Pakistan. :clap2:

    India will also highlight the recent collection of funds in the name of Hizbul commander Burhan Wani.

    According to the latest Asia Pacific Group report on action taken by Pakistan against terror financing in line with FATF recommendations, exclusively accessed by TOI, Islamabad claimed to have taken several measures under international pressure against these UN listed groups. The action included taking over the management of these UNSCR 1267 designated organisations — LeT and its charitable arms — FIF and JuD, and appointing an administrator from Punjab (Pakistan) government to oversee their operations. Pakistan also said it has frozen 33 bank accounts related to individuals and entities associated with LeT, JuD and FIF. In order to stem the fundraising activities of these outfits, the Nawaz Sharif government claimed to have put a ban on advertisements seeking funds in the name of charity, holding public rallies and has blocked websites and telephone services for raising of funds.

    However, the report which Indian officials are likely to raise in Paris says that the Markaz is still running under the name of JuD, which indicates that asset freezing and prohibitions on collecting funds are not comprehensively implemented. Indian officials say that Jamaat-ud Dawa and its branches still openly hold public rallies and collect funds while Pakistan is lying to the international community on such action.

    "It's all eyewash. Pakistan doesn't want to take action against UN listed organisations and individuals and doesn't comply with the recommendations of world body on terrorism financing — FATF," said a government functionary.



    The Indian delegation, which includes officials from MHA, MEA and other agencies, will also share steps taken by the Narendra Modi-led government in curbing terror funding through banking and non-banking channels, confiscating terrorists' assets, action on money laundering and amending unlawful activities (prevention) act to criminalize terror financing.

    In its last report to FATF in 2015, India had informed that Pakistan-based terror outfit Hizb-ul-Mujahideen was receiving funds originating from Pakistan through different channels.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...t-international-meet/articleshow/54874631.cms

    What can we expect?
    '
    International Isolation for pakistan from 190 nations :tongue2: Not really

    partial sanctions on engagement with pakistan political or otherwise :tongue2: May be

    :clap2:scrutiny of paki funding to all other nations be it even by the paki business community will be under scrutiny.. :D this can actually hinder the pace at which paki does business with outside world. :clap2:

    paki uses business money with terrorism and India need to sensitize other nations on it..

    ooh la laa!!!! We got a nice snow ball in the making!!
     
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  16. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Modi takes on Pakistan at BRICS, terms it 'mother ship of terror'

    Taking on Pakistan at the BRICS summit, India on Sunday said terrorism is a “direct threat” to economic prosperity and growth.


    Speaking at the BRICS leaders' meeting, Prime Minister Narendra Modi sought action against terrorism and called for an early adoption of CCIT (Comprehensive Convention on International Terrorism).


    “The most serious direct threat to our economic prosperity is terrorism; tragically, its mother-ship is a country in India’s neighbourhood,” Mr. Modi said, indirectly referring to Pakistan.

    New Delhi’s concerns about cross-border terrorism has been an underlying factor in the ongoing BRICS summit and the various bilateral meetings that India held over the last two days here.

    Addressing the media, Foreign Secretary S Jaishankar said that India thanked Russia for “unequivocal condemnation” of terrorism after the September 18 Uri attack that killed nineteen soldiers. Prime Minister Modi, spoke against terrorism in his speech during the 17 th India-Russia summit that was held on Saturday and pitched for blacklisting of Masood Azhar, Pakistan-based leader of terror group Jaish-e-Mohammed, at the United Nations, in his meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping.

    China stresses cooperation under SAARC

    However, a disagreement between China and India was visible after Mr. Modi held talks with President Xi on Saturday evening. Contradicting India’s tough position, which led to the postponement of the Islamabad SAARC summit, President Xi demanded more cooperation under the SAARC framework.

    “China and India should consolidate public support for bilateral friendship by boosting exchanges between their political parties, local governments, think tanks, cultural bodies and media organizations,” President Xi said and added, “meanwhile, the two countries should support each other in participating in regional affairs and enhance cooperation within multilateral frameworks including the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO), the South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation and the East Asia Summit,” Xinhua reported.

    On Saturday, President Xi also reached out to South Asian leaders and met with Prime Minister Pushpa Kamal Dahal ‘Prachanda’ of Nepal and promised developmental support to Kathmandu.
    http://www.thehindu.com/news/nation...urhood-pm-modi-tells-brics/article9226569.ece
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2016
  17. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Pakistan is host to Ivy League of terrorism, Uri attack part of continuous trail: Govt

    Hours after Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif raised the issue of Kashmir and praised Hizbul Mujahideen terrorist Burhan Wani who was killed in an encounter with security forces on July 8, India on Thursday hit back and called Pakistan a “terrorist state” which hosts the “Ivy League of terrorism:pound:” and carries out “war crimes” against Indians through its “long-standing policy of sponsoring terrorism”.

    Later in the day, the Ministry of External Affairs spokesperson Vikas Swarup used a Hindi proverb to drive home the point that the Pakistani establishment was colluding with terrorists. Responding to a query on the absence of Pakistan’s intelligence chief at a SAARC meeting of intelligence chiefs in New Delhi, Swarup said “chor ki daadhi mein tinka” :pound:(having done something wrong and trying to hide it).



    Exercising India’s right to reply after Sharif’s speech to the UN General Assembly, Eenam Gambhir, First Secretary at the Permanent Mission of India to the UN, said, “The land of Taxila, one of the greatest learning centres of ancient times, is now host to the Ivy League of terrorism. It attracts aspirants and apprentices from all over the world.”:pound:

    “The effect of its toxic curriculum are felt across the globe,:pound:” she said, adding it was ironical that a country which had established itself as the global epicentre of terrorism was preaching human rights and talking about ostensible support for self-determination. Gambhir said shortly before Pakistan gave its “hypocritical sermons” at the world body, its envoy in New Delhi was summoned over the most recent of the terror attacks, the one at Uri that claimed 18 Indian lives. “That terrorist attack is part of a trail of continuous flow of terrorists trained and armed by our neighbour and tasked to carry out terrorist attacks in my country,” she said.



    “When practised as an instrument of state policy, it is a war crime. What my country and our other neighbours are facing today is Pakistan’s long-standing policy of sponsoring terrorism, the consequences of which have spread well beyond our region,” she said. India sees in Pakistan “a terrorist state” that channelises billions of dollars, much of it diverted from international aid, to training, financing and supporting terrorist groups as militant proxies against it neighbours.

    In a clear reference to Jaish-e-Muhammad chief Masood Azhar and Mumbai terror attack mastermind Zaki-ur-Rehman Lakhvi, Gambhir said terrorist entities and their leaders, including many designated by the UN, continue to roam the streets of Pakistan freely and operate with state support.



    “With the approval of the authorities, many terrorist organisations raise funds openly in flagrant violation of Pakistan’s international obligations,” she said. While Pakistan’s nuclear proliferation record is marked by “deception and deceit,” it talks about restraint, renunciation and peace. “Similar false promises it has made to us — the international community — on terrorism. Perhaps renunciation of lies and self-restraint on threats could be a good place for Pakistan to start,” Gambhir said.

    Criticising Sharif for glorifying Hizbul Mujahideen terrorist Burhan Wani, she said, “Even today, we have heard support from the Prime Minister of Pakistan for a self-acknowledged commander of a known terrorist organisation.” She said Pakistan was a democracy-deficit country and practised terrorism on its own people.



    “It extends support to extremist groups, suppresses minorities and women and denies basic human rights, including through draconian laws,” she said. She voiced India’s firm resolve to protect all its citizens from all acts of terrorism in Jammu and Kashmir. “We cannot and will not allow terrorism to prevail,” she said.

    Later in the day, Swarup also hinted at the Indus Waters Treaty — as there is a growing demand for it to be reviewed and used as a lever against Pakistan — “for any such treaty to work, you need mutual trust and goodwill. I will leave it at that.” He said that over the past two days, about 50 countries have spoken at the UNGA, but nobody had raised the issue of Kashmir — 80 per cent of Sharif’s speech was on that issue. He also praised UN Secretary General Ban ki-Moon’s “wise” words that India and Pakistan should resolve the dispute “bilaterally”.

    Asked about diplomatic relations between India and Pakistan, he said demarches — like the one made on Wednesday to Pakistan High Commissioner Abdul Basit — can be made only if there are diplomatic relations.:pound: He was responding to a question on demands from certain quarters for snapping diplomatic ties.

    Swarup said India does not need to prepare any dossier since the world knows about the deeds of Pakistan on terrorism.:pound: He said Foreign Secretary S Jaishankar had shown Basit photographs of grenades with Pakistan markings and GPS devices, which he called “irrefutable evidence”. He reiterated India’s request for checking the fingerprints and DNA samples of terrorists in Uri attack with their own national database to establish their identity. “We await a response from Pakistan,” he said. He declined to comment on Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to Islamabad for the SAARC summit in November. “Every question cannot be answered in yes or no,” he said.

    http://indianexpress.com/article/in...k-part-of-continuous-trail-says-govt-3044703/
     
  18. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Who coined 'Ivy League of terrorism' and how India found language of rebuttal against Pak
    Nikhila Natarajan Updated: Sep 23, 2016 07:00 IST

    Who wrote the 'Ivy League of terrorism' rebuttal that demolished Pakistan's anti-India rant at the UNGA?

    ×
    A “brainstrust” of 5 senior staffers sitting around Syed Akbaruddin's desk on the 4th floor of India's permanent mission to the US in New York's East 43rd St put their heads together to write up the 513 word stinger that has broken free from the trap of knotty officialese while Pakistan errs on the other extreme with cuckoo outbursts at its annual whine fest in New York City.

    [​IMG]
    All in a day's work - scripting the India pushback from Akbaruddin's office in NYC

    Syed Akbaruddin, a 1985 batch IFS officer, is India’s Permanent Representative to the United Nations - the boss in the New York outpost.

    The applause for India's strident tone, content and the brevity of the rebuttal on September 21 has been stirring.

    Word cloud for People Like Us

    “Deception”, “deceit”, “lies”, “terrorism”, “toxic curriculum”, “sermons”, “preaching” - the word cloud from India’s rap taps into the collective loathing Indians feel about Pakistan’s web of lies. No wonder then that the Eenam Gambhir slam dunk is taking a dizzy ride on social media platforms.


    Commoners' lingo

    The way politics is practised is changing everywhere - where truth and evidence are of secondary importance and popular trust in established institutions has crashed. By slamming Pakistan’s baloney so hard on the world stage, India is responding to the change in how audiences consume foreign policy and meeting them where they are, in language that is evocative yet blunt, something that appeals to outliers who are shunning elitism in droves.

    Short attention spans have been fully factored in - a 500 worder for a Pakistan pushback is as good as it gets.


    Four hours from start to finish

    "It took 4 and a half hours from start to finish, after Nawaz Sharif spoke," a top official at India's UN mission told Firstpost in a detailed off the record conversation.

    They’re not telling who came up with the coolest line of the one pager - “Ivy League of terrorism”. “We don’t want to go into that but when we did come up with it, we knew we had a winner.”


    These five people are drawn from the inner circle at the mission here and “of course, we consulted Capital ( New Delhi)” while the draft got polished to a sparkle.

    Who chose Eenam Gambhir?

    What about the choice of Eenam Gambhir? Who took that call? The same person who played big daddy for the theme of the stern rejoinder settled on Gambhir as a natural choice.

    "That decision (of Gambhir speaking) was taken well before we finished writing this. We wanted to make a few things very clear. Whoever speaks for us speaks for India. There's no question of seniority here. So we chose our youngest officer and anyway, she has been working on this. It's her area.”

    But the Gambhir read-out is not the starter piece for this new hauteur. That happened in July when Syed Akbaruddin took a meat cleaver to tear into Pakistan’s misuse of the UN forum — “…Pakistan; a country that covets the territory of others; a country that uses terrorism as state policy towards that misguided end; a country that extols the virtues of terrorists and that provides sanctuary to UN-designated terrorists.”

    The approach has been consistent now at least for the last few months - Akbaruddin pitched tent in New York early this year.

    New style sheet

    A top diplomat who oversaw the latest India offensive to the last detail admits there is a deliberate change in style. “Diplomacy has to reach audiences spead across wide swathes of the world, not just Indians in a limited sphere of operation,” he said.

    That approach is now being hard wired into the content creation at the mission - “sharper statements, smaller sentences, not long winded”.


    Incidentally, media and communication as an academic discipline are not new for Syed Akbaruddin - his father headed the journalism department at Osmania University for many years and later the research wing at FTII Pune too. Akbaruddin inks every official communication from the mission and so too for India’s reply at UNGA.

    That there is very little traction for Pakistan adds to India’s confidence in these recent maneovers.

    “If they want to come to the United Nations and talk about India, we will do what we have to do. Our default position is that this has to be sorted out bilaterally, however if you (Pakistan) bring this to the UN, we have a counter narrative ready which is stronger,” says the official.

    Every paragraph of the India counter has at least one mention of the word terrorism — this was a consensus among the group of five.

    Girl power

    “In 5 minutes of time, you can’t put in too much. It’s not a general debate statement. If we had too many themes, it would lose its bite, so we were clear that we keep it short and everything we did with the rebuttal was a conscious choice.”

    That includes the language, target audience, end game, closure and the choice of a woman to speak for India.

    Apart from being chosen for being the youngest, Gambhir as the woman factor was strategy, not randomness.

    “They (Pakistan) talked about women and all that bluster, we said chalo, we’ll send a woman in reply. The optics are not lost on us. We got it right. The whole world could see that the bullies were watching while Gambhir spoke."


    "It wasn’t like - achcha bhai, kisi ko bhi bhej do. “We know exactly what our messaging was and how to deliver it for maximum effect. This is the voice a much more confident India, the official said.

    That Pakistan uses the UN forum time and again to spin a tangled web of falsities does not impress the folks at India’s mission to the UN.

    “That they can come up with speeches like this and we all know that it finds no resonance - it means there’s something terribly wrong with their diplomacy,” the official said.

    Like others, India’s top officials at the mission here know that Pakistan’s wacko stance at UNGA is a reflection of the state of domestic politics. “They have a town with two sheriffs, so the way they turn out at world forums mirrors the contradictions within.”

    To fittingly answer politicians messing around in a global sandbox with assertions that have no basis in fact, India may have just found a new currency of rebuke - emotion, in short form.

    External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj is likely to raise the terror attacks in Uri and Pathankot in her speech at the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) most likely on September 26.

    That’s up next.



    http://www.firstpost.com/world/who-wrote-ivy-league-of-terrorism-rebuttal-against-pak-3016626.html
    ---------------------------

    Awesome ..No?

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  19. Mikesingh

    Mikesingh Senior Member Senior Member

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    Make Pakistan behave like a sovereign nation as its supposed to be? You gotta be joking, right? It's more probable that the sun will rise from the West due to a pole shift on earth than Pakistan behaving like a mature nation.

    Pakistan is a stillborn child - dead from its inception! It's like flogging a dead horse to rise and shine!
     
  20. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Absolutely...It was a Sarcasm... the establishment of pakistan always say pakistan is a sovereign nation with nukes..and we all know

    pakistan is a soverign nation with drone as its national bird and terrorism as its state asset .
     
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  21. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    Breaking the Rhetoric with Offensive Defence - Military Option at Play!


    Lock, Stock And No Smoking Barrel



    by Namrata Biji Ahuja and Ajit K. Dubey


    There is no perceivable evidence of India’s covert operation across the LoC, precisely because it was what our special forces intended. THE WEEK brings you exclusive details about what happened before, during and after those crucial four hours when our men were out avenging Uri


    Exclusive details about what happened before, during and after those crucial four hours when our men were out avenging Uri



    There was no surgical strike. What the Indian Army did to seven Pakistan Army-guarded terrorist launch pads across the Line of Control was a covert commando operation. An eminently successful one at that.



    A surgical strike, says the Macmillan Dictionary, is “a military attack, especially by air, that is designed to destroy something specific and to avoid wider damage”. The common military understanding is that it is an attack carried out without warning and intended to deal only with a specific target. Such operations are quick and covert, but the result is left open for the world to see. The classic example is Israel’s air raid on Iraq’s Osirak nuclear reactor in 1981.


    What the Indian Army did on the night of September 28-29 was a slow and laborious operation, which had troops creeping, climbing and crawling across the LoC and across two kilometres of rugged terrain, avoiding stepping on land-mines or alerting village dogs, reaching largely undefended targets, catching the enemy off-guard, killing him and destroying his camp in the dark. No photos sent, no bodies carried back, no trophies. But they did it.



    [​IMG]



    As much was conceded, though inadvertently, by Air Marshal (retd) Shahzad Chaudhry of the Pakistan Air Force: “What India has done is an LoC violation. Not a surgical strike.”


    The Indian Army had done it earlier, too (see graphics). Pointed out Lt Gen Hardev Singh Lidder, former chief of Integrated Defence Staff and veteran special forces officer: “We have had strikes earlier, but those were mostly local. This is the first time that strikes were carried out as a national policy.”



    The idea of a covert counterstrike was mooted on September 18 night, when Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar and Army chief Dalbir Singh Suhag were flying back to Delhi from the brigade headquarters in Uri, where 18 soldiers had been killed in a terror strike early that morning. Parrikar wanted the general to give him a few actionable options that they could present to Prime Minister Narendra Modi in the cabinet committee on security the following day.


    Meanwhile, Modi had been in touch with National Security Adviser Ajit Doval. He wanted to know whether the attack had a confirmed Pakistani link. Yes, said Doval. A GPS set found on the attackers had shown that they had come from across the LoC.



    That night, on Gen Suhag’s orders, the directorate-general of military operations headed by Lt Gen Ranbir Singh burnt the midnight oil. Doval ordered all intelligence inputs, from the National Technical Research Organisation (NTRO), the Research and Analysis Wing, and the Intelligence Bureau, to be made available to the DGMO. But Ranbir Singh had a problem. The Army’s Northern Command had informed him of the existence of 30-odd launch pads across the LoC within striking distance, but they had all been emptied out immediately after the Uri attack. Yes, the Pakistanis were expecting payback.




    A launchpad, as an officer explained to THE WEEK, is like a bus shelter. The training camps, mostly run by ex-army officers on the payroll of outfits like Lashkar-e-Taiba, are deep inside Pakistan-occupied Kashmir—often 30 to 40km inside. From there, the trained boys are taken to the launchpads, where they spend days until the coast is clear for infiltration. Guides, mostly villagers and double agents, take them across the LoC.



    At the cabinet committee on security the following day, the Army’s proposals (“not one, but several,” said a senior officer) were discussed. An in-principle clearance for an operation was given. (The final clearance would come a week later.) Meanwhile, Doval advised the committee to discuss other options like revisiting the Indus Water Treaty, stopping trade and suspending diplomatic relations. “All that talk created the clutter that we wanted,” said the officer. “It also lured the enemy into thinking that we wouldn’t hit back.”:clap2:




    The trick worked. “In a few days, we had inputs that the launchpads were again getting peopled,” said the officer. The enemy had an urgency. It would start snowing in a few days and the infiltration routes would get blocked.



    Once the in-principle go-ahead was issued, Modi called on President Pranab Mukherjee and briefed him. On September 20, Doval told the PM that a defensive approach would not suffice this time. “We need to be offensive-defensive,” he is said to have told Modi.




    Once Modi charged him with overseeing what could be done, the first thing Doval did was to “empower” the chiefs of the forces, the various intelligence gathering units and the surveillance agencies to forget procedural clearances. “If there are any glitches, sort them out yourselves. Share as much as you can among yourselves,” Doval is said to have told them.




    The chiefs did not have a problem. They knew that the Army had resorted to cross-LoC actions several times in the past, but it was the first time they were being asked by the political leadership to do it. All such actions in the past had been cleared at the brigade, division, corps or command level.




    The political clearance eased things. For the first time, the agencies opened their operational rooms to other agencies. :clap2:The uphill task was to decipher the satellite imagery and provide real-time technical intelligence to the Army’s Northern Command headquarters in Udhampur, which would have to supervise the strike. “For any intelligence agency, assets and techniques are paramount,” explained an NTRO officer. “They cannot be accessed by even the chiefs of other agencies. For the first time, we allowed the Army inside our base and they allowed our men. At both the locations, our men were sitting together. As a result, what would have taken five to eight hours for one agency to decipher, was done in five minutes.”:clap2::clap2:




    Meanwhile, the Northern Command, headed by Lt Gen D.S. Hooda, was making its own assessments. He had the freedom to choose the targets. The morale of the military was paramount. So was the timing. Hooda asked the formation commanders under him to identify 150 commandos for a few tasks. The commanders chose three broad target areas which fell under the 19 Division (Uri), 28 Division (Kupwara) and 25 Division (Rajouri). By then, the military’s own intelligence, too, had provided targets across Uri, Poonch and Bhimber sectors.




    But who would do the strikes? It had to be a commando operation undertaken by the special forces. The two units chosen for the task were the Udhampur-based 9 Para (SF) and 4 Para (SF), commanded by Col Kapil Yadav and Col J.S. Sandhu, respectively.




    An SF battalion comprises four assault teams which have close to 100 men. The teams are further divided into three assault troops comprising 24 men, supported by troopers who operate heavy weapons such as RPO7 flamethrowers and PK machine guns. But Hooda correctly assessed that the operation could not just be ‘outsourced’ to the special forces. The units that had taken the terrorist hit at Uri would like to have their pound of flesh. So a few Ghatak commandos of the 10 Dogra, 6 Bihar and 19 Punjab, which are otherwise regular infantry, were also selected. They were to avenge the death of their buddies.:clap2::clap2:




    Hooda now ordered a few diversionary activities. Formations were told to move troops along the 250km arc from Uri to Rajouri sectors on the LoC to confuse the enemy. Artillery batteries were asked to open up all along to keep the Pakistani posts engaged. The IAF’s Western Command also chipped in. It restarted its Exercise Talon, which had been put on hold because of a mishap involving a Jaguar deep-strike aircraft in Ambala. As the airspace on the Indian side got saturated with Indian fighter flying, the Pakistan Air Force suspended all civilian air activity over PoK and Gilgit-Baltistan, and kept its air defences on high alert.



    When Modi was addressing BJP workers in Kozhikode in Kerala on September 24, Lt Gen Ranbir Singh was conferring with Lt Gen Satish Dua, commander of the Srinagar-based 15 Corps, and Lt Gen N.N. Nimbhorkar, commander of the Nagrota-based 16 Corps. And, in an undisclosed location, the SF troopers were practicing strikes.:clap2::clap2:



    As soon as Modi returned from Kozhikode, there were further diversionary tactics at the political and diplomatic level. On September 26, he summoned experts and explored the possibility of choking the Indus waters. As think-tanks, the media and the government’s spin-doctors discussed the pluses and minuses of the move, others speculated on how China would hit back by choking the Brahmaputra. The spin the following day was about severing trade ties and diplomatic links.


    The final go-ahead was given on September 27. A couple of hours before the H-Hour, the Kupwara division intensified small arms and mortar fire. By then, the assault troops of 24 each from 9 Para (SF) and 4 Para (SF) had been divided into four groups of 12 each. They had been taken by helicopters to four locations on the Indian side of the LoC in Kel, Tutmari Gali, Nangi Tekri and Baalnoi post in Mendhar sector. “No helicopter flew to the other side,” said an officer.




    A couple of teams slipped out between the Beloni and Nangi Tekri battalion areas in Poonch sector and across the Tutmari Gali in the Nowgam sector. The Ghatak teams were pushed in separately, but they were told that the assault would be made by the para commandos. They could join the fight and kill if the enemy opened fire on the commandos on their way back.



    Around 11pm on September 28, Parrikar and Doval reached the Army’s operations room. Gen Suhag was waiting for them. The three had skipped a dinner hosted by the Coast Guard chief for his commanders’ conference.



    The Ghatak teams had crossed the LoC the previous evening and had been lying in wait. The idea was that even if they were caught, the Pak troopers would have thought of them as teams who had come to avenge the killing of their buddies. Any exchange of fire with them would have also been a diversionary tactic from the main operation.



    About an hour after the midnight of September 28, the commandos crossed the barbed-wire fences, which in most places are about a kilometer short of the LoC. There was a nip in the night air, a sign of the approaching winter. In a few days, there would be snowfall, and the passes and tracks would become difficult to traverse. That also meant another certainty, confirmed by the NTRO’s decoded maps: the launchpads had been peopled again with infiltrators. “The enemy had evacuated all launchpads immediately after the Uri attack,” said an officer. “But the boys were brought back because they had to be sent across before the passes got blocked.”


    How did the commandos get to know of the tracks? “Didn’t you know of the guides on the LoC?” asked an officer. “There are local villagers who help the infiltrators. They also help us. Some are from our side; some from the other.”



    By around 1am, most teams had traversed the stretch between the fence and the LoC, and crossed into enemy territory. They hardly carried any electronic equipment, for fear of being caught by the enemy’s electronic sensors. They knew the coordinates of the terrorist launchpads from the satellite images provided by the NTRO. A few maps had also shown unusual activity at some of the launch pads on previous days.



    The commandos knew one thing for sure. The boys at the launch pads would not be armed. The Pak army never allowed terrorists to roam around the nearby villages with arms. They were given arms only when their mission began.




    The SF troops, wearing jungle camouflage, walked slowly with the aid of night vision devices and night sights on their Tavor rifles, and reached their designated targets. There was little resistance from the Pakistan troops. Most pickets on the LoC were still being engaged by the Indian small arms fire. The few soldiers who were guarding the launchpads were gunned down in no time:clap2::clap2:.



    As the SF troops reached the villages housing the launchpads, they barged into the buildings and used the Russian RPO7 flamethrowers, which created a temperature of 3,000 degrees Celsius and caused massive explosions. Once they reached their targets, it was more of an arson exercise than actually engaging the enemy in combat.:clap2::clap2:




    The job was done in less than 40 minutes in most target areas.:clap2::clap2: The commandos returned before daybreak with Ghatak troopers guarding their rear. “Once the troops returned to their launch bases, helicopters were sent to fetch the officers, who were lifted straight to Udhampur and Nagrota for debriefing,” said the officer. Overall, the operations lasted almost four hours. Four to five launchpads (whether one was actually a launchpad or an abandoned village hut was not certain), located up to 2km deep in enemy territory, had been destroyed.:clap2::clap2:



    How many did they kill? The Army is not giving specific numbers, because “they just set fire to the launchpads and made a quick exit. No one knows how many were there inside.” The estimate is 40 to 45 killed, based on estimates of the number of persons each launchpad can hold. But five launch pads and two Pakistan army posts—which were co-located with the launchpads—were destroyed and all occupants killed. The most realistic estimate is that about 30 were killed in three launchpads.




    A statement released by Pakistan’s Inter-Services Public Relations said, “At least two army men were killed as Indian and Pakistani troops exchanged fire over the LoC in Azad Jammu and Kashmir.” A few hours later, ISPR released the photographs of the dead soldiers, havildars Jumma Khan and Naik Imtiaz. The casualty on the Indian side? Two para commandos injured in landmine blasts on their way back.



    By 4.30am on September 30, the operation was declared successful and Modi was briefed. The PM was not shown a “live telecast” of the operation, as reported by some.


    Early morning, Lt Gen Ranbir Singh called up his Pakistani counterpart, Maj Gen Sahir Shamshad Mirza, who had taken over recently as director-general of military operations, and told him that India had struck at the launchpads in the territory under his control.



    Uri was avenged. :india:


    Source>>
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2016
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