MUST SEE: Confusion over changes in child rail ticket concession

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by Ray, Jul 23, 2014.

  1. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    This is really unusual.

    Families travel on holidays to their homes, people go out as a family for excursion. Railways is the ideal way to see India and bond with the different people and places which make them proud to be Indians. Not all are affluent to travel by air.

    Further, the best way to see India is to travel by road in your own car, so that you can stop where you want and interact and see. That is not feasible in conducted road trips by tourist agencies. However, the cost of petrol and diesel has made this impossible.

    The next best is by rail. You can see the countryside as the train moves past.

    Air travel is the worst way to see India since it flies high and you are confined from one point to another.

    It is true that a child travelling with concession occupies a seat or berth just like an adult. Had that seat or berth been booked by an adult, the railways would have received the full fare. If people don't grudge paying airlines full fare for children, why should they seek concession during rail travel, but then the Railway Board senior official must realise that it is not the rich who travel by train or those who can afford air travel.

    Further, Railways is run on tax payers money and not the airlines! Hence, it should be a profit oriented cum social need balanced organisation.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2014
  2.  
  3. ladder

    ladder Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2013
    Messages:
    4,751
    Likes Received:
    2,666
    Location:
    India
    Children 0-5 years are not allocated separate berth IMHO.

    But, what is disgraceful? They are removing the child concession in Phases what is the problem?
     
  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Then they should remove all concessions including free travel that of the Railway personnel, MPs and so on to include the disabled, senior citizens, freedom fighters and their attendant (most of them are bogus in any case).

    IS the Railway and the MPs special class to travel free?

    Categories with Concessional fare
    http://www.indianrail.gov.in/conc_Rules.html
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2014
  5. ladder

    ladder Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2013
    Messages:
    4,751
    Likes Received:
    2,666
    Location:
    India
    Those concession too should go. But, one at a time or all in a single stroke? Or take some decision and roll back few of then if there is protest? What do you suggest?
     
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere

    Why one at a time?

    One must look at the rationale for the concession.

    India is already in turmoil since we are getting too insulated with our own communities and religion and all that.

    It is time to open up India for all to see. Travel is the only answer,

    One cannot be lopsided. While much talk is being made about opening up domestic tourism, if you make the travel cost prohibitive, then were is domestic tourism and refurbishing the sluggish economy.

    There has to be synergy.

    Have you noticed the plight of those from NE in Delhi?

    Or how little we know, including on the DFI, about anything beyond Bengal?

    it is all because people are not encouraged to travel and interact because of poor infrastructure in publicity, hotels and rail and air links.

    Isn't it time to encourage all to visit NE so that they bond or do we want the NE people to feel that they are 'foreigners' int heir own land because none know anything about them?

    On concessions, the defence gets concessions, but the Railways does not lose. It is paid from the Defence Estimates to include special trains that carry a unit from Place A to Place B.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2014
  7. ladder

    ladder Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2013
    Messages:
    4,751
    Likes Received:
    2,666
    Location:
    India
    Domestic tourism will be not affected if 50% concession is provided to children? Well be affected if that concession is removed?

    Removing children concession makes travel prohibitive? That is strange logic.

    If someone reserves one berth or one seat he/she should pay full why the difference between child or adult?

    Providing concession to everyone going for domestic travel too would also improve tourism, should 50% concession to all should be provided?

    BTW, cross subsidy is already accounted for.

    ===================
     
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    The bulk of domestic tourism is not the high flying jet setters. They go international.

    it is basically the average man who takes off during Pujas and Diwali holidays to tour around as a family.

    They travel not only as a family, but as an extended family with a whole lot of children.

    Therefore, the child concession not being there, will only deter them.

    Let the free concessions given be removed and it will be a great save to the exchequer.
     
  9. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    [​IMG]

    Domestic tourism

    Domestic travelers recorded an all-time high of 650 million during 2009, 15.5% higher than the previous year. After rising 18% and 14% respectively in 2006 and 2007, rise in domestic travel slowed down to 6.9% during 2008. The increase in 2009 reflects recovery in sentiment in the later part of the year and preference for domestic visits over international visits. Although the Indian economy was not as severely affected by the economic slowdown as other economies, Indian consumers are cautious and are either postponing their travel plans or opting for shorter duration holidays and travelling within the country. Indians travel within India mainly for pilgrimage/religious reasons, leisure, visiting families/friends and business.

    [​IMG]

    Online travel sales have increased drastically in recent years. Greater proliferation of the Internet, growth in low-cost air carriers, secure payment mechanisms, and coming-up of the Indian railways portal have led to rise in online sales in the travel industry. A number of low-cost carriers operate on certain routes, and hence online booking offers choice of air carriers to customers. Airline ticket booking constitutes more than 70% of online travel sales. However, a shift is being seen from air to non-air segments in the online travel market. This shift is due to the non-air ticket booking segment growing swiftly with launch of the Indian Railways online portal (www.irctc.co.in) and many online travel agencies providing bus tickets. Indian Railway Catering and Tourism Corporation is the largest travel website in the APAC in terms of transaction volumes. A number of hotels also use the Internet for booking of rooms.

    https://www.dnb.co.in/Travel_Tourism/Indian_Travel_and_Tourism_Industry.asp
     
  10. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
  11. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    Significance of domestic tourism

    Narinder Kumar


    Tourism has been a major social phenomenon from time immemorial. Motivated by the natural urge of every human being for new experiences, adventure, education and entertainment, these also include social, cultural and business interests.

    Travel for pilgrimage and learning has been an integral part of Indian culture and thus several centuries of learning and religious worship developed all over the country. This gave further impetus to the mass movement of people from one place to another. Development of traditional industries and trade created yet another stream of travellers. Several trading routes were established and traders started frequenting the centres of trade from distant places. The ancient rulers gave due consideration to these travellers and created many wayside facilities like inns, sarais, dharamsalas and caravans for their benefit. Thus, India has been experiencing a massive movement of domestic tourists for several decades.

    A few centuries ago the Moghul rulers introduced pleasure tourism by building luxurious palaces and gardens in places of natural scenic attraction, including many in the beautiful valley of Kashmir. It was, however, during the British rule in India, that domestic tourism received new direction and meaning. Several hill stations were also developed during the period, which became the core of the Indian leisure tourism.

    The emergence of a large 'urban middle class' coupled with better transport and communication facilities has created a new class of holiday and leisure tourists in contemporary India. Millions of pilgrims and devotees now travelling from one part of the country to another make an effort to understand the spirit and mystique of India and take pride in its ancient cultural traditions and ethos.

    Domestic tourism is also one of the most vibrant expressions of Indian heritage. It is the single unifying force, which helps in achieving understanding between various linguistic, religious and communal groups living in different parts of the country. In the contemporary India, the phenomenon of domestic tourism with its vibrant and changing dimensions can be expected to make an even greater contribution toward strengthening the fabric of the unity of India.

    Despite its great significance in the national integration and development, domestic tourism has not received adequate attention in the process of development planning. However, there has been the almost unobtrusive and yet inexorable rise of domestic tourism in the Indian paradigm. From approximately 270 million domestic visits in 2003, the number rose to almost 432 million in 2006. The ministry of tourism's vision is to achieve a level of 760 million domestic tourist visits by the year 2011, the end of the 11th Plan at an annual average growth of 12 per cent.

    The average Indian is also an avid sightseer and can travel thousands of miles to different environments. A significant pointer to this is travel during the summer months, a time when most foreign tourists avoid India. The bulk of the affluent middle class, however, flock to the tourist stations of the Himalayas and test the carrying capacity of these resorts to the maximum. Even in winter, the Indian traveller is on the move, targeting seaside resorts, forests sanctuaries, desert safaris and historical monuments for special attention. Domestic tourism is also fuelled by business travel to various parts of the country, as also by agriculture demands.

    Hitherto, domestic tourism was confined to lower spectrum of spending and so did not figure in hotel and restaurant receipts. Now the domestic tourist demand is shifting to expansive tourist resorts, hotels and resorts.

    As the rich domestic tourist will look after himself, there is a need to make domestic tourism reach within the capacity of the lower middle class and millions of pilgrims and devotees. It should be the job of the Central and state governments, travel agencies and tour operators and other agencies to work out packages which they could conveniently afford.

    Since accommodation is the core of the tourism industry, efforts need to be made to provide the domestic visitors economy accommodation. There are a large number of dharamsalas, sarais, choultries, agarshalas etc., which were built round the places of worship only during ancient times through the efforts of private individuals, institutions and rulers. The British administration then built a number of circuit houses, dak bungalows and rest houses and hill resorts. Most of the dharamsalas and sarais are today in a dilapidated condition. These could be made fit for staying with a small expenditure.

    Dharamasalas and sarias at the pilgrimage and religious places should be improved and provided with more facilities. Some of our pilgrim places woefully lack even basic hygienic amenities. During the festival days, millions of pilgrims and devotees visit the shrines, a large majority of them sleeping in the open with hardly any sanitary facilities. Basic facilities at these places including camping sites and budget hotels, which the ordinary travellers could afford should be developed not only at the pilgrimage and religious places but at other places of interest. Presently, tariffs of hotels run by the tourism corporations in northern India are beyond the reach of average domestic traveller.

    Former tourism minister, Jagmohan had rightly said that domestic tourism must be the backbone for international tourism. It is the base on which the pyramid of international tourism is built. He said that tourism was more of a civilisational issue and thus a total change in mindset was needed to usher in a tourism friendly atmosphere. Ours is a vast and a varied country, pluralistic in food, language, custom and religion. Tourism contributes significantly to our ethos of unity in diversity and integration. Hence the primary importance of domestic tourism, which needs more importance than it has received. Today in pilgrim tourism alone, there are more than 150 million people travelling within the country in each year. This class of tourists requires special attention. National Tourism Policy also focuses on domestic tourism as a major driver of tourism growth.

    Talking about the importance of domestic tourism, Jafar Jafri says that " In order to attract foreign exchange and promote understanding across the boundaries, perhaps, each country should first look within and develop its domestic tourism industry for internal bridges of understanding and stronger economic structure. Then the country can more surely receive international tourists for foreign exchange and promote cross-cultural communication for a global communication".

    With exposure to their countries past heritage and resources, contemporary efforts, and future aspirations, the people travelling within their own country, can witness the dynamism of their own country at work, and see and learn about their own nation. Consequently, the country, with its problems and prospects in sight will become a more real rather than a national country. Domestic tourists repeatedly zigzagging the country further reinforce the many cultural themes with national characteristics or potentials.

    Apart from the cultural benefits, domestic more than international tourism, help in the development of local products including handicrafts and cottage industry products which the visitors take back as souvenirs and gifts for their relatives and friends. The economically backward regions also get benefited on account of the visit of the domestic tourists from creation of employment and income opportunities.

    Often the local infrastructure and standards are more readily acceptable to domestic than to international tourists. As the demand for international tourism depends upon many external factors such as international economic prospects, international political climate, air accessibility, and seasonal oscillations, domestic tourism is more stable. Northern Indian states would do well to promote domestic tourism by providing them reasonably priced facilities and design inter state packages.

    The author is Professor Tourism at ITFT- Chandigarh

    Significance of domestic tourism - Express TravelWorld
     
  12. ladder

    ladder Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2013
    Messages:
    4,751
    Likes Received:
    2,666
    Location:
    India

    I am taking your point a little further, why not 50% concession on all who are travelling for domestic tourism, tourism will improve by leaps and bounds.

    Same should be extended to business travelers also, as economy will improve.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2014
  13. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2009
    Messages:
    43,118
    Likes Received:
    23,545
    Location:
    Somewhere
    .


    Because one would not know who is going for domestic tourism and who are on a lark.

    Business travellers have the money and it is reimbursed by his company, but the average govt servant, a farmer or even a petty businessman does not have.

    Take it further, why not have free travel for all!

    Children are your future.

    They require to be exposed to India and its differences and its commonality. That is why it is important that they see India and Indians beyond the narrow confines and prejudices of their State.


    Notice how the children of those who are from All India Services are more tolerant to ambiguities of India than others. All because they have had a change to mix and cohabit with an all India mix and not being frogs in the well.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2014

Share This Page