Multiple Independently Targetable Reentry Vehicles (MIRVs)

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by LETHALFORCE, May 10, 2009.

  1. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    India Poised To Test Agni-V Missile | AVIATION WEEK

    India Poised To Test Agni-V Missile


    India is about to take another big step forward in its nuclear weapons delivery capacity with plans to flight-test the Agni-V ballistic missile this year.

    The Agni-V would represent a big step forward in India’s strategic weapons arsenal given its range in excess of 5,000 km (3,100 mi.). Once testing begins, developers hope to declare the Agni-V operational in two years. The missile’s predecessor, the 3,500-km-range Agni-III, is currently under induction into strategic missile groups governed by India’s nuclear command.

    The development comes as the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute warns that India and Pakistan “continue to develop new ballistic and cruise missile systems capable of delivering nuclear weapons. They are also expanding their capacities to produce fissile material for military purposes.” The organization notes in its latest yearbook that the Indian nuclear stockpile is estimated to have grown to 80-110 warheads, up from 60-80 a year ago, with Pakistan’s inventory at 90-110 warheads, up from 70-90.

    Earlier this month, in a departure from the Indian government’s traditional reluctance to talk publicly about the country’s strategic weapons arsenal, Indian Defense Minister A.K. Antony ordered the country’s missile program administrators to speed up the Agni-V program, saying, “the [Defense Research Development Organization] must demonstrate its capability to reach the range of 5,000 km at the earliest.” DRDO chief Vijay Saraswat adds that the 22-meter-long (72-ft.) Agni-V would be test-fired in December.

    In May, the Indian Nuclear Command Authority (NCA) reviewed progress on the indigenous submarine-launched ballistic missile (SSBN) program and the country’s long-range missiles. That meeting appears to have led to the decision to speed up the Agni-V program and ensure that there were no slippages in the induction of India’s first nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine, the Arihant, next year.

    The Agni-V’s range puts China—India’s principal focus as far as nuclear deterrence is concerned—fully within range of a retaliatory strike. India functions on a no-first-strike nuclear policy. The Agni-V will be cannisterized, road-mobile and designed for quick deployment. It was revealed last February that the Agni-V is also being developed to carry multiple independently targetable re-entry vehicle (MIRV) warhead payloads.

    An Agni-V program developer says “the missile will soon be ready in all respects for its first test. We are continuing with subsystem testing and simulation trials. We do not foresee any delays.” The 700-km-range Agni-I and 2,000-km-range Agni-II are already operational.

    The three-stage prototype Agni-V that will be fired is currently under integration and fabrication. The DRDO’s Advanced Systems Laboratory (ASL) has tested the missile’s three stages separately on the ground. The Agni-V will be India’s first strategic missile with a rocket motor built from composites, unlike the metal construction used in all earlier Agni-series missiles. Over the next few months, confirmatory ground evaluations of all major subsystems will be completed. Last year, the program team grappled with delays arising from changes to the weapon’s payload structure, the addition of extra heat shields and alterations to the missile’s re-entry mechanism.

    In terms of range, the Indian government does not feel the need to go beyond what the Agni-V is capable of, making it perhaps the last long-range ballistic missile in the country’s guided weapons program for the foreseeable future. The DRDO has revealed that while it has no official sanction to build an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) with ranges in excess of 8,000 km, it has developed the critical technology to build one quickly if necessary.

    Less is known about India’s K-series of submarine-launched missiles. While the K-15, with a range of 750 km, continues to be tested to meet the specifications of India’s first indigenous SSBN, the Arihant, DRDO engineers have unofficially spoken of a long-range missile being developed for underwater launch. While the Agni-V will fulfill the land leg of India’s nuclear deterrent, it is the 3,500-km-range K-4 missile that will truly complete the country’s strategic triad, providing it with a crucial strike capability from the sea. India’s Arihant-class SSBNs, the first of which is scheduled to enter service late next year, are being built to deploy four K-4s and 12 K-15s. An even longer-range variant of the K-4, with a range of 5,000 km, is also being planned.
     
  2. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    SS-20 Saber from Russia this is IRBM with MIRVs

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    The Hindu : Opinion / Editorials : India’s latest strategic weapon

    India’s latest strategic weapon


    With the flawless flight of Agni-III on Wednesday, a powerful new weapon — and one that can be built upon in the years to come — is practically ready to enter India’s strategic arsenal. While Agni-I can reach places 700 km away and Agni-II can take its warhead some 2,000 km, the all-solid, two-stage Agni-III missile has a range of over 3,500 km. Thus, the new missile will give the country’s strategic forces the ability to strike well beyond the imme diate neighbourhood. Moreover, adding a small third stage to the Agni-III configuration would produce a missile with a range of 5,000 km or more. Given DRDO’s proven solid propulsion capabilities, this should pose no major problem. Indeed, senior officials of the Defence Research and Development Organisation have stated that design work on Agni-IV has begun. It is noteworthy that Agni-III and its future variants, with a diameter of two metres, will be the first Indian missiles having the potential to be equipped with Multiple Independently-Targetable Re-entry Vehicles (MIRV). A single missile with MIRV can carry several nuclear warheads, each of which can target a different place. However, unlike the addition of a third stage, creating MIRV capability could pose significant technological challenges, especially in terms of reducing the size and weight of the warheads.

    Across the border, Pakistan has been repeatedly testing Shaheen-II, its missile with the longest range that can strike much of India. Last month, the missile was fired twice in a space of three days. China, meanwhile, is in the process of modernising its strategic forces and switching from liquid-fuelled ballistic missiles to solid-propellant ones that can be launched quickly. Its latest submarine-launched ballistic missile, the JL-2, and the land-based variant of the missile, the DF-31, could soon be operationally deployed. A study published last year by analysts at the National Institute of Advanced Studies in Bangalore indicated that the JL-2/DF-31, with a diameter of two metres, was in fact a three-stage missile with MIRV capability. The missile’s three warheads might be arranged around a small third stage with a diameter of about one metre. They estimated that the missile in its MIRV configuration could have a range of about 8,000 km. With just a single warhead, the JL-2/DF-31’s range would increase to 12,000-14,000 km. Fortunately, all this activity on the missile front has not dampened overtures of friendship and efforts to reduce sources of tension between India and its nuclear-armed neighbours. Rather, it reflects a strategic mindset that seeks to augment military capability as a way of keeping the peace.
     
  4. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Russia test launches Bulava strategic missile

    Russia test launches Bulava strategic missile

    The Russian military test launched its Bulava intercontinental missile Tuesday from the Yury Dolgoruky submarine in the White Sea, a major boost for the navy after a series of failures.

    The test was the first such launch from the strategic nuclear submarine specifically designed to carry the Bulava missiles, said defence ministry spokesman Igor Konashenkov.

    All previous such launches had been made from the Dmitry Donskoi submarine.

    "The launch has been successful according to all the parameters," Konashenkov told AFP.

    The missile was fired in the White Sea in northwestern Russia and hit its target in the Kura firing area on the Kamchatka peninsula in the Pacific Ocean some 6,000 kilometers (3,730 miles) away, Konashenkov said.

    Russia plans to conduct four more missile launches this year, he added. If further tests are successful, the missile can be taken up by the armed forces in late 2011 or early next year, Konashenkov said.

    It was the 15th such test overall and the first this year, according to the defence ministry. Of the previous launches, only seven were successful.

    In 2009, the Bulava's main designer resigned after the failures, which defence experts called a major setback to Russia's bid to revamp its nuclear arsenal by 2020.

    The Bulava, which can be equipped with up to 10 individually targeted nuclear warheads capable of changing their flight trajectory, has a maximum range of 8,000 kilometres (5,000 miles).

    Its incorporation into the armed forces is part of a wide-ranging military reform aimed at updating the armed forces' Soviet-era structures and equipment to bring them in line with the demands of modern warfare.

    The missile is designed for use with Russia's new Borei class of nuclear submarines like the Yury Dolgoruky and Alexander Nevsky, named after key historical figures.

    Analysts have previously said the vessels risk being worthless unless the Bulava works.

    In late 2009, a similar missile launch ended in failure, causing spectacular images in the sky above the Norwegian city of Tromso and prompting initial speculations they were caused by a meteor, the northern lights or even a UFO.

    The White Sea, the usual site for such missile tests from Russian submarines, lies close to Norway's own Arctic region.

    Defence analysts cautiously welcomed the launch, saying the armed forces had learnt from mistakes but more tests were needed.

    "This is the beginning of possible success. Eight successful tests out of the 15 is a sign of hope, but nothing more than that," defence analyst Alexander Golts told AFP.

    "The Yury Dolgoruky is the first of the new missile carriers which has completed at-sea tests and is ready for use. There is no doubt this is good news for the Russian navy and the military."
     
  5. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  6. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Eyeing China, India to enter ICBM club in 3 months

    Eyeing China, India to enter ICBM club in 3 months - The Times of India

    NEW DELHI: The countdown has begun. Within three months, India will gatecrash the super-exclusive ICBM (inter-continental ballistic missile) club, largely the preserve of countries like the US, Russia and China that brandish long-range strategic missiles with strike ranges well beyond 5,500 km.

    However, it will become a full-fledged member of the club only when its most ambitious nuclear-capable Agni-V ballistic missile, which will be able to target even northern China if required, becomes fully operational in 2014.

    Gung-ho a day after the successful test of the new-generation 3,500-km Agni-IV missile, senior defence scientists on Wednesday declared that Agni-V, with a strike range of over 5,000-km, would be test-fired within the December-February time-frame.

    "The three-stage Agni-V is undergoing integration at the moment...it's on schedule," DRDO chief V K Saraswat said, adding that both Agni-IV and V were comparable to the best missiles in their class, including Chinese ones, as far as the technology was concerned. Agni programme director Avinash Chander said his team was "confident" of offering the 17.5-metre-tall Agni-V for induction to the armed forces by 2014. The much-lighter two-stage Agni-IV will be operational by 2013 after two to four more "repeatable" tests.

    "Our aim is to take just two to three years from the first test to the induction phase," he said.

    Once deployed, the 20-tonne Agni-IV and 50-tonne Agni-V will add the much-needed muscle to India's nuclear deterrence posture against China, which has a huge nuclear and missile arsenal like the 11,200-km Dong Feng-31A ICBM which is capable of hitting any Indian city. With higher accuracy, fast-reaction capability and road mobility, unlike the earlier largely rail-mobile Agni missiles, Agni-IV and V will give India the required operational flexibility against China since they will be capable of being stored and swiftly transported. If launched from the north-east, for instance, they will be able to hit high-value targets deep inside China.

    India, however, is not in an arms race or "numbers game" like the US-Soviet rivalry of the Cold War era. "We are not looking at how many missiles China or Pakistan has. With a 'no first-use' nuclear weapons policy, we only want a sufficient number of missiles to defend the country in the event of a crisis. Ours is a defensive-mode strategy, even if others have offensive postures," Saraswat said. The DRDO chief added that "indigenous content" in India's strategic missiles had gone up to such a level, with ring-laser gyros, composite rocket motors, micro-navigation systems and their ilk, that "no technology control regime" could derail them any longer.

    Then why not go for missiles that can fly around 10,000 km? DRDO claims that it has the capability to develop such missiles but the government does not want alarm bells to clang around the globe. India, after all, is interested only in "credible minimum deterrence" against the threats it faces. Saraswat said the current focus was on fine-tuning the Agni missiles to defeat anti-ballistic missile systems of potential adversaries. Towards this end, added Chander, the radar and other "signatures" of Agni-IV have been significantly reduced to make them "much more immune to counter-measures".

    What will make the Agni missiles even more deadly is the development of MIRV (multiple independently targetable re-entry vehicles) warheads on which the DRDO is working. An MIRV payload on a missile carries several nuclear warheads, which can be programmed to hit different targets. A flurry of such missiles can completely overwhelm BMD ( ballistic missile defence) systems.
     
  7. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    CROSS POSTED

    Eyeing China, India to enter ICBM club in 3 months - The Times of India

    Eyeing China, India to enter ICBM club in 3 months - The Times of India


    NEW DELHI: The countdown has begun. Within three months, India will gatecrash the super-exclusive ICBM (inter-continental ballistic missile) club, largely the preserve of countries like the US, Russia and China that brandish long-range strategic missiles with strike ranges well beyond 5,500 km.

    However, it will become a full-fledged member of the club only when its most ambitious nuclear-capable Agni-V ballistic missile, which will be able to target even northern China if required, becomes fully operational in 2014.

    Gung-ho a day after the successful test of the new-generation 3,500-km Agni-IV missile, senior defence scientists on Wednesday declared that Agni-V, with a strike range of over 5,000-km, would be test-fired within the December-February time-frame.

    "The three-stage Agni-V is undergoing integration at the moment...it's on schedule," DRDO chief V K Saraswat said, adding that both Agni-IV and V were comparable to the best missiles in their class, including Chinese ones, as far as the technology was concerned. Agni programme director Avinash Chander said his team was "confident" of offering the 17.5-metre-tall Agni-V for induction to the armed forces by 2014. The much-lighter two-stage Agni-IV will be operational by 2013 after two to four more "repeatable" tests.

    "Our aim is to take just two to three years from the first test to the induction phase," he said.

    Once deployed, the 20-tonne Agni-IV and 50-tonne Agni-V will add the much-needed muscle to India's nuclear deterrence posture against China, which has a huge nuclear and missile arsenal like the 11,200-km Dong Feng-31A ICBM which is capable of hitting any Indian city. With higher accuracy, fast-reaction capability and road mobility, unlike the earlier largely rail-mobile Agni missiles, Agni-IV and V will give India the required operational flexibility against China since they will be capable of being stored and swiftly transported. If launched from the north-east, for instance, they will be able to hit high-value targets deep inside China.

    India, however, is not in an arms race or "numbers game" like the US-Soviet rivalry of the Cold War era. "We are not looking at how many missiles China or Pakistan has. With a 'no first-use' nuclear weapons policy, we only want a sufficient number of missiles to defend the country in the event of a crisis. Ours is a defensive-mode strategy, even if others have offensive postures," Saraswat said. The DRDO chief added that "indigenous content" in India's strategic missiles had gone up to such a level, with ring-laser gyros, composite rocket motors, micro-navigation systems and their ilk, that "no technology control regime" could derail them any longer.

    Then why not go for missiles that can fly around 10,000 km? DRDO claims that it has the capability to develop such missiles but the government does not want alarm bells to clang around the globe. India, after all, is interested only in "credible minimum deterrence" against the threats it faces. Saraswat said the current focus was on fine-tuning the Agni missiles to defeat anti-ballistic missile systems of potential adversaries. Towards this end, added Chander, the radar and other "signatures" of Agni-IV have been significantly reduced to make them "much more immune to counter-measures".

    What will make the Agni missiles even more deadly is the development of MIRV (multiple independently targetable re-entry vehicles) warheads on which the DRDO is working. An MIRV payload on a missile carries several nuclear warheads, which can be programmed to hit different targets. A flurry of such missiles can completely overwhelm BMD ( ballistic missile defence) systems.
     
  8. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    CROSS POSTED

    Eyeing China, India to enter ICBM club in 3 months - The Times of India

    Eyeing China, India to enter ICBM club in 3 months


    NEW DELHI: The countdown has begun. Within three months, India will gatecrash the super-exclusive ICBM (inter-continental ballistic missile) club, largely the preserve of countries like the US, Russia and China that brandish long-range strategic missiles with strike ranges well beyond 5,500 km.

    However, it will become a full-fledged member of the club only when its most ambitious nuclear-capable Agni-V ballistic missile, which will be able to target even northern China if required, becomes fully operational in 2014.

    Gung-ho a day after the successful test of the new-generation 3,500-km Agni-IV missile, senior defence scientists on Wednesday declared that Agni-V, with a strike range of over 5,000-km, would be test-fired within the December-February time-frame.

    "The three-stage Agni-V is undergoing integration at the moment...it's on schedule," DRDO chief V K Saraswat said, adding that both Agni-IV and V were comparable to the best missiles in their class, including Chinese ones, as far as the technology was concerned. Agni programme director Avinash Chander said his team was "confident" of offering the 17.5-metre-tall Agni-V for induction to the armed forces by 2014. The much-lighter two-stage Agni-IV will be operational by 2013 after two to four more "repeatable" tests.

    "Our aim is to take just two to three years from the first test to the induction phase," he said.

    Once deployed, the 20-tonne Agni-IV and 50-tonne Agni-V will add the much-needed muscle to India's nuclear deterrence posture against China, which has a huge nuclear and missile arsenal like the 11,200-km Dong Feng-31A ICBM which is capable of hitting any Indian city. With higher accuracy, fast-reaction capability and road mobility, unlike the earlier largely rail-mobile Agni missiles, Agni-IV and V will give India the required operational flexibility against China since they will be capable of being stored and swiftly transported. If launched from the north-east, for instance, they will be able to hit high-value targets deep inside China.

    India, however, is not in an arms race or "numbers game" like the US-Soviet rivalry of the Cold War era. "We are not looking at how many missiles China or Pakistan has. With a 'no first-use' nuclear weapons policy, we only want a sufficient number of missiles to defend the country in the event of a crisis. Ours is a defensive-mode strategy, even if others have offensive postures," Saraswat said. The DRDO chief added that "indigenous content" in India's strategic missiles had gone up to such a level, with ring-laser gyros, composite rocket motors, micro-navigation systems and their ilk, that "no technology control regime" could derail them any longer.

    Then why not go for missiles that can fly around 10,000 km? DRDO claims that it has the capability to develop such missiles but the government does not want alarm bells to clang around the globe. India, after all, is interested only in "credible minimum deterrence" against the threats it faces. Saraswat said the current focus was on fine-tuning the Agni missiles to defeat anti-ballistic missile systems of potential adversaries. Towards this end, added Chander, the radar and other "signatures" of Agni-IV have been significantly reduced to make them "much more immune to counter-measures".

    What will make the Agni missiles even more deadly is the development of MIRV (multiple independently targetable re-entry vehicles) warheads on which the DRDO is working. An MIRV payload on a missile carries several nuclear warheads, which can be programmed to hit different targets. A flurry of such missiles can completely overwhelm BMD ( ballistic missile defence) systems.
     
  9. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    The Tribune, Chandigarh, India - Main News

    5,000-km range missile enough for India: Kalam

    Rajpura/Fatehgarh Sahib, November 17
    A nuclear-warhead capable inter-continental ballistic missile (ICBM) that has a range of 5,000 km was enough to watch India’s strategic interest, said former President Dr APJ Kalam while interacting with students of Chitkara University here today.

    “An ICBM with 5,000-km range was enough as the potential enemies were well within this range,” said Dr Kalam, replying in context of India’s announcement to test Agni-V, an ICBM that can travel more than 5,000 km. On being asked about the need to develop ICBMs with longer range, the Missile Man of India, without referring to rapidly emerging neighbour China, said the threat was not from trans-Atlantic Ocean.

    On being asked about the education system in the country, he said though the Indian students were in big demand abroad, the educational establishments needed to focus more on research. “Good research would mean better teaching faculty and students with multi-pronged approach. The technologies and the system should converge,” he said while calling upon the faculty and students to learn integrated system design. Giving a success mantra to the students who would be graduating from the university, he said the future was for those who could design, integrate and manage systems and technologies such as nanotechnology, biotechnology and information technology.

    Stressing upon the audience to work for the nation’s welfare, he said everyone needed to deliver back to the system and society. “Nations with knowledge and synergy are the world leaders and others follow,” he said.

    He outlined 10 pillars of Indian development profile 2020. Based his interaction with 12 million youths in the country and abroad, he said everyone would have become unique and think out of the box. “There has to be aim, regular update of knowledge, hard work and perseverance to achieve a goal in life,” he said while trying to strike a chord with the students who cheered to every advice handed out to them.

    Earlier, he was at Sanghol in Fatehgarh Sahib to inaugurate the International Conference on Rural Development Challenges and Opportunities. The conference is being organised by Lord Rana’s, UK-based charitable trust at Cordia Group of Institutes.

    He said nuclear energy was a clean energy and it would be beneficial for the people and the state. He said the states must go for nuclear energy.

    He also stressed the need to ensure development of rural India by strengthening PURA (Providing Urban Facilities in Rural Areas) and to take it as a mission. Elaborating on PURA, he said it involved physical, electronic and economic connectivity. He suggested to the DC and Lord Rana to make Sanghol village “Sanghol PURA”.
     
  10. JAISWAL

    JAISWAL Senior Member Senior Member

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    ok friends whats the update or any news on Agni-6 (A6).
    As mentioned in this artical posted.

    .
    [​IMG]
    as underlined
     
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  11. KS

    KS Bye bye DFI Veteran Member

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    irrelevant
    A6 ??? Wtf.
     
  12. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    Must be A5 will be without MIRV and A6 with MIRV since RV has to redesigned.

    other explanation can be that A5 is bigger so it cannot come inside sub, therefore A6 for sub with MIRV.
     
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  13. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

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    The underwater launch capability would help a lot in our case. We have distant and crucial islands to hold and a couple of necks to choke around straits of Malacca.

    Regards,
    Virendra
     
  14. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    SL missile cannot be more then 12.5 meters, A3 is 16.3 m, since A5 add one more stage to A3 therefore it will be more then A3 in hight. if that is the case A6 has to be 12.5 meters to be fired from ATV for SL launch.
     
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  15. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Rumor has it that there is a MIRV'd SLBM in development,do you know about this Saya??
     
  16. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    I always say this pic is for real, i cannot tell you how i know this, but it is for real. This A3 SLBM with MIRV must be that A6 with (MIRVs).

    [​IMG]

    Uploaded with ImageShack.us

    All credit to Arun sir for this image.
     
  17. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  18. Pintu

    Pintu New Member

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    This line has been withdrawn from DRDO newsletter, and even the some of the sentences have been changed. Therefore raising suspicion , that there might be one or more secret program of this kind has been in the offing, the fact neither acknowledged , nor denied by the DRDO.

    Regards
     
  19. JAISWAL

    JAISWAL Senior Member Senior Member

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    thats a very much possibility that whant it to be a secret like ATV and Saurya.
     
  20. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    they must be following us closely.................8)
     
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