MRCA 'Strategic and Political' Aspect, benefits and losses

Discussion in 'Indian Air Force' started by rahulrds1, Nov 16, 2010.

  1. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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  3. Indianrabbit

    Indianrabbit Regular Member

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    Never thought Germany is spelled starting with J.
     
  4. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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    Interview given by Hervé Morin, Minister of Defence, France, to "Indian Defence Review" : October 18, 2010

    Source: http://ambafrance-in.org/france_inde/spip.php?article6715

    Question: - Could you give a brief overview of Indo-French defence relations?

    Ans :- We have a long-standing military cooperation. When India desired to diversify its military relations in the early 1980s, France responded, and a relationship of trust was built, especially with the supply of Mirage 2000s.

    The Rafale is an exceptional aircraft, which meets the needs of the Indian Air Force particularly well.

    In 1998, India and France decided to raise their bilateral relation to a strategic level. The establishment of an Indo-French strategic partnership enabled us to strengthen our ties further and mutually support our voices at international bodies. Whether it concerns its candidature for a permanent seat at the Security Council or the amendment of regulations for civil nuclear energy exportation, India knows that it can count on France’s support.

    Since the beginning of our strategic partnership, a high-level defence committee has been meeting every year and other agreements have strengthened our bilateral relations. I would particularly refer to the founding of an annual forum on research and technology in 2002, and the signing of the Indo-French defence agreement in 2006. Further, joint military exercises are held every year between our air forces and navies. Our relation in all these areas has attained a high level of trust.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2011
  5. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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    India France Relations :

    France and India have extensive strategic co-operation, with the military services of both nations conducting joint exercises. India has purchased much military equipment from France, especially the French Mirage 2000 fighter aircraft and the Scorpène class submarines. France was one of the few nations who did not condemn India's nuclear tests in 1998 and has supported India's bid to become a permanent member of the U.N. Security Council as well as G-8. France is one of the largest suppliers of nuclear fuel to India, and signed a "Framework Agreement for Civil Nuclear Co-operation" in January 2008 during French President Nicolas Sarkozy's visit to India. During the Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh's visit to France after India's waiver from the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG), both nations signed an agreement that would pave the way for the sale of French-made nuclear reactors to India on September 30, 2008. France and India also maintain a discreet "strategic dialogue" that covers joint cooperation against terrorism. However, India has objected to France's military assistance to Pakistan, with whom it is in conflict. In July 2009 the French government invited the Indian prime minister Manmohan Singh to be their chief guest at the French national day (Bastile day) celebrations. Both countries pledged for closer economic, strategic & cultural cooperation on this occasion.

    Source: wikipedia.org
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2010
  6. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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    India Germany Relations :

    Germany has extensively supported education and cultural development in India. Germany helped establish the Indian Institute of Technology Madras after both governments signed an agreement in 1956 and increased its cooperation and supply of technology and resources over the decades to help expand the institution.

    In 2008, both nations established the Indo-German Science and Technology Center in New Delhi to promote joint research and development in energy, environment, coal and water technologies.[4][6] Germany is India's largest European trading partner and the 5th largest trade partner. Current trade volume stands at € 10.5 billion in 2006, € 12.7 billion in 2007-08 and both nations see it increasing to € 30 billion by 2010. India and Germany enjoy strong commerce and cooperation in telecommunications, engineering, environmental technology, food processing, chemicals and pharmaceuticals.

    Strategic ties:

    In the 1990s, Germany condemned India's 1998 nuclear tests, but has since expanded its cooperation with India in fighting terrorism and conducting joint military exercises. Germany has also supported India's waiver from the Nuclear Suppliers Group to trade nuclear materials and energy.In 2008, the Indian navy and the German navy conducted joint exercises for the first time, following a defense cooperation agreement between the two nations signed in 2006.[7]
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2011
  7. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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    Fighter jet rebuff, Roemer exit, signal US-India distance

    Source : http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...nal-US-India-distance/articleshow/8109993.cms

    WASHINGTON: In an alphabet soup of acronyms that spell informal diplomatic tie-ups featuring India, there's the newbie BRICS, the neighbourhood SAARC, the spread-out IBSA, the under-stated BIMSTEC, the formidable ASEAN, and the hoary NAM, not to speak of the various Gs that have nothing to do with spectrum: from G-77 to G-20. But there's one big association that has repeatedly failed to live up to promise for much of this decade: Ind-US.

    On Thursday, the emerging alliance was dealt a significant blow when New Delhi rejected two American firms from a massive jet aircraft deal while pencilling in two European firms for final selection.

    There was dismay in Washington at the decision, particularly since the Obama administration and proponents for a strong US-India strategic alliance had invested much energy in lobbying for the two American fighter jets - from Lockheed Martin and Boeing - which were in the race.

    "There is an acute sense of disappointment in the US government about this decision," said Ashley Tellis, a Carnegie Endowment scholar who authored a 140-page report titled "Dogfight" on the India's Multi-Role Combat Aircraft (MRCA) decision. "As best I can tell, the downselect was made entirely on the basis of the technical evaluations - the cost of the aircraft or the strategic considerations did not enter into the picture."

    Indeed, Tellis, who was also a key figure in the US-India civilian nuclear deal, had indicated in his study that the Eurofighter, one of the two finalists, would edge to the top of the list in terms of overall sophistication. But, he had argued, "having an American airplane in the IAF livery would simply be transformative for bilateral defence relations and it would send an important signal about the changing geopolitical dynamics in South Asia." US officials, from President Obama to secretary of state Hillary Clinton to ambassador Tim Roemer in New Delhi, had sent out the similar messages. The Americans were also keen on the deal as an export factor which would help job creation at home.

    But New Delhi, suddenly in thrall of strengthening ties with BRICS and the European Union, remained cool to US entreaties even as the warmth of the Obama visit appears to have faded quickly. Evidently, the MRCA decision, as Tellis told ToI in an email, was largely made on technical metrics at the expense of strategic considerations.

    "The IAF, which is a fighter force, chose a fighter pilot's fighter: airplanes that are hot rods," Tellis explained, adding what this leaves India with now is a choice between two "incredibly expensive" fourth-generation jets ($85million + for the Rafale and the $125million+ for the Eurofighter by his estimates). If India goes with the former, it will end up literally bailing out Dassault which has not sold a single Rafale abroad yet, he added.

    Expectedly, proponents of the use of the MRCA decision as a strategic choice are pillorying New Delhi's call. "The UPA government's decision to reject both American proposals, of the F-16 and F/A-18, demonstrates either a poor appreciation of the geostrategic aspect or worse, indicative of a lingering anti-American mindset," said Nitin Pai, a Fellow at the Takshashila Foundation. "This move will most certainly reduce India's geopolitical leverage with the US military-industrial complex, at a time when India needs it most."

    Pai, who also edits the journal Pragati, the Indian National Interest Review, maintained that India was being "gratuitously generous" to Europe, where Italy had blocked India's UNSC candidature and other smaller countries had tried to wreck the US-India nuclear deal. "Not buying fighter aircraft from a US supplier is strategic stupidity of enormous proportions," he added, while mockingly asking whether "Europeans will use their non-declining global superpower in support of India in AfPak, East Asia, UNSC etc."

    For their part, the arms companies have played it cool, aware that there is yet more than $ 100 billion at stake as India modernizes its military. Boeing, whose F-18 Super Hornet lost out in the MRCA deal, still has its heavy lift helicopters Apache and Chinook in play in a separate deal, having already won contracts for heavy lift transport planes. "We are obviously disappointed with this outcome. We believe we offered the Indian Air Force a fully compliant and best-value multi-role aircraft for the defined mission," the company said in a statement, adding, "We will continue to look for opportunities to help India modernize its armed services and enhance its aerospace industry."

    Tellis too suggested both sides should look forward without rancor. "Whatever India goes with, I hope the commercial negotiations are concluded quickly and that the chosen fighter enters the force soon - IAF force structure will simply dissolve without the MRCA and the LCA," he warned.

    The larger question though is whether the MRCA set-back to Washington will affect the broader US-India relations, which have been frequently bedevilled by trade spats and strategic misperceptions. Already, Washington is fuming about New Delhi not keeping its end of the nuclear deal bargain. The annual strategic dialogue between the two sides scheduled for April had to be deferred ostensibly because of regional elections in India, but some analysts have suggested that it was because of the nuke deal screw-up and the impending MRCA rebuff. The sudden resignation of US ambassador to India Timothy Roemer, coming within hours of the MRCA decision being made public, is also seen as a setback although Tellis believes it is not linked to the MRCA call.

    Amid all this, the regional environment is getting increasingly complex with a toxic Pakistan upping the ante with Washington and demanding India's downsizing in Afghanistan as price for its cooperation. Former US under secretary of state and Af-Pak envoy Marc Grossman headed out to New Delhi last night on the first leg of his trip to the region where more than Af-Pak is at stake
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2011
  8. rahulrds1

    rahulrds1 Regular Member

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    U.S. "deeply disappointed" by thumbs down to fighter jets

    Source : www.thehindu.com

    With both Boeing and Lockheed Martin failing to make it to the Indian Air Force's final shortlist for the $11 billion deal for 126 Medium Multi Role Combat Aircraft (MMRCA) — a contract that American leaders and diplomats had said would determine the direction of strategic relations between the two countries — the United States on Thursday expressed deep disappointment at the outcome and indicated it would continue to press its case with India.

    Representatives of the European consortium offering Eurofighter and French Dassault offering Rafale were on Thursday asked by the Ministry of Defence to extend the validity of the commercials bids — that expire on April 28 — till December 31, 2011, officials said here.

    It is understood that the companies have been given two weeks' time to complete the formality while on its part, the Ministry decided to start the process of “benchmarking,” setting a price band for the deal.

    As reported by The Hindu on Wednesday, the Ministry sent letters to the two European companies after completion of Technical Evaluation by the Indian Air Force. The process of ‘down selecting' the two meant elimination of the other four competitors including two American firms — Boeing (F/A-18 Super Hornet) and Lockheed Martin (F16IN Super Viper). Sweden's SAAB (Gripen) and Russian Mikoyan (MiG35) were the other two to lose out in the deal that is estimated around Rs. 45,000 crore.

    Of the 126 MMRCA , 18 would be in ready-to-fly condition while the rest were to be produced in India under Transfer of Technology. That 50 per cent value of the deal would have to be sourced within the country is among the terms and conditions.

    Roemer ‘disappointed'

    Meanwhile, the U.S. Ambassador, Timothy J. Roemer, said he was “deeply disappointed” on being informed by the government that the two aircraft it offered to India were not selected for procurement.

    In a statement released hours after announcing his decision to resign as the Ambassador, he said the Embassy was reviewing the documents it received from the government and “is respectful of the procurement process.”

    Mr. Roemer said he had been personally assured at the highest levels of the Indian government that the procurement process for the MMRCA “has been and will be transparent and fair” and expressed confidence that aircraft offered by Boeing and Lockheed Martin would “provide the Indian Air Force an unbeatable platform with proven technology at a competitive price.”

    “We look forward to continuing to grow and develop our defence partnership with India and remain convinced that the United States offers our defence partners around the globe the world's most advanced and reliable technology,” the statement said.

    On its part, the Boeing company said it would request and receive a debrief from the Indian Air Force and after reviewing the details, it will make a decision concerning possible options, “always keeping in mind the impact to the Indian Air Force.”

    “We believe we offered the Indian Air Force a fully compliant and best-value multi-role aircraft for the defined mission. We will continue to look for opportunities to help India modernise its armed services and enhance its aerospace industry,” the company release said.

    Over the last few years, the United States has successfully sold several defence equipment to India through the Foreign Military Sales (Government-to-Government) route. These include 12 Boeing VIP Business Jets, 8 P8I Long Term Maritime Patrol Aircraft. Lockheed Martin has supplied the first of the six C130J tactical transport aircraft for IAF and a follow-up order is expected. 12 weapon locating radars, Landing Ship Dock INS Jalashwa (USS Trenton) are already with India while recently HAL/DRDO signed deal for 99 GE414 engines to power ‘Tejas' Light Combat Aircraft.

    The government is in the process of finalising deal for 10 Boeing C17 Globemaster transport aircraft that American President Barack Obama indicated during his November 2010 visit. In addition, the Indian Army is to get 145 ultra-light Howitzer field guns from BAE Systems while inquiries are on for Javelin anti-tank missile, beside a few more. The collective value of these deals is expected to cross $ 15 billion.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2011
  9. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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  10. usapaki

    usapaki New Member

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    The USA has worked with Pakistan to take out and kill Bin Laden.

    You have spit in the face of the quid pro quo of UNSC membership, USA future technologies.

    Well Pakistan saw their opportunity.

    It will be Pakistan flying the F-35.

    You have made a terrible, terrible strategic blunder - we have worked together to insure the re-election of OBAMA for many more years!!!

    OBAMA will go down in history, his reign will last another ten years and the Pakistani will be flying UAVs with HELLFIRE MISSLE!!
     
  11. JBH22

    JBH22 Senior Member Senior Member

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    oh tough guy if this goes according plan Pakistani army will have dinner at Delhi Inshallah :)
     
  12. p2prada

    p2prada Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    Holy Hell
    Obama cannot keep getting re elected term after term. If he wins the next elections he will rule for 4 more years and then retire from politics.
     
  13. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    And i will volunteer to wash dishes of pakii generals. :pound:
     
  14. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    Uh... yeah. USA didn't tell Pakistan about the operation until AFTER it was over. They didn't want ISI tipping off Osama so he could get away again. Pakistan was HARBOURING Osama for TEN years. I wouldn't be suprised to see military aid quickly disappearing... much less Pak EVER getting F-35.
     
  15. sandeepdg

    sandeepdg Senior Member Senior Member

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    You dumbass, your country begs for bullets and rations from the Americans, and you expect to receive the F-35 as a gift ??? No way you have the money to afford it anyway other than buying Chinese planes. And don't worry about our future relations, USA is smart enough to understand the value of a strategic rising power like India holds for the US in Asia and they don't give a shit about you. The US-Pakistan relationship is that of a master(US) and its dog(Pakistan) and will remain that way forever.
     

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