More consensus than differences with India, says Chinese Minister

Discussion in 'Foreign Relations' started by AVERAGE INDIAN, Jun 9, 2014.

  1. AVERAGE INDIAN

    AVERAGE INDIAN EXORCIST Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Messages:
    2,762
    Likes Received:
    2,718
    Location:
    Detroit MI
    [​IMG]

    Mr Wang is optimistic that a solution to boundary issue could be found

    China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi, who begins an official visit to New Delhi on Sunday, has expressed optimism that India and China, under the new leadership of Mr Narendra Modi, could find a solution to the vexed boundary question, by showing “strong will and resolve”. Mr Wang stressed that both sides had “more strategic consensus than differences”.

    In an exclusive interview with The Hindu, Mr. Wang, who will on Sunday establish the first high level contact from Beijing with Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government, called on both sides to ensure that differences over the border dispute do not “affect the normal development of our relations”.

    Mr. Wang, in written responses to questions submitted by The Hindu, also revealed that President Xi Jinping had personally instructed him to visit India as his “special envoy” soon after Mr. Modi took office, underscoring the Chinese leadership’s intent to quickly establish contact with the new government in New Delhi. He also confirmed that Mr. Xi will visit India later this year - his first visit as President - although the Chinese leader will is likely to meet briefly with Mr. Modi in July on the sidelines of the BRICS Summit in Brazil.

    The Chinese Foreign Minister praised Prime Minister Modi for showing the world “resolve and courage” by setting an agenda to push reforms and development and for injecting “vigour and vitality” immediately after taking charge.

    His comments indicate that the Chinese leadership believes Mr. Modi’s government will embark on a “reform and development” process akin to what former Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping unleashed three decades ago. The Chinese government, he said, wants to invest in special industrial zones in India as well as share its experiences of reforms from 30 years ago.

    “My trip brings a most important message to the people of India — China stands by your side throughout your efforts of reform and development,” Mr. Wang said. “It is a trip to convey messages and to get to know more friends.”

    He said while it was “unavoidable that between neighbours, there might be certain issues left from history or some differences in immediate interests”, both countries “have much more strategic consensus than differences”.

    “No country can choose its neighbour, but friendship may be fostered,” he said. “Certain issues may not be avoided, but innovative answers could be found. One can not rewrite history, but the future is in our hands.”

    Mr. Wang said China “highly appreciated” India's support following a string of recent terror attacks in its western Xinjiang region. Describing terror as a common challenge, he said Beijing “stands ready to deepen counter-terrorism cooperation” - an issue that has, in the past, figured lower on the agenda considering China's ties with Pakistan.

    On trade relations, the Chinese Foreign Minister acknowledged both sides were yet to make the most of the untapped potential, which he likened to “the emerging tip of a massive buried treasure that awaits your discovery”.

    Last year, bilateral trade declined by 1.5 per cent on account of a slump in Indian exports of ores, propelling the trade deficit to a record $ 31.4 billion. China has proposed boosting mutual investments to bridge the gap. Mr. Wang expressed optimism that both sides would soon finalise an agreement on setting up Chinese industrial parks in India.

    Excerpts of the interview

    As a new government takes office in New Delhi, this is the first high-level visit from China. How does China view the future of working with the government under Prime Minister Modi?

    I am very honoured to visit India as the special envoy of President Xi Jinping shortly after the new government took office. I was here in this beautiful country many times, but this trip is different. It is a trip to convey messages and to get to know more friends. It is also a trip to cement our existing friendship and explore further cooperation. India was a cradle of splendid ancient civilisation, and I am glad to see this country gaining new vigour and vitality.

    Less than two weeks into office, the new Indian government, led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, has already shown to the world its resolve and courage in pushing forward reform and development, and its sincerity and enthusiasm in seeking friendship and cooperation with other countries. The international community, impressed by the great opportunities in India, is full of confidence in the future of the country.

    My trip brings a most important message to the people of India — China stands by your side throughout your efforts of reform and development, and your pursuit of dreams. China is ready to work with our Indian friends for an even brighter future of our strategic and cooperative partnership.

    How does China view the current situation along the boundary?

    The boundary question is indeed a difficult one, but with strong will and resolve, we will eventually find a solution. Even if we could not resolve it for the time being, we could at least manage it effectively, not allowing it to affect the normal development of our relations. Thanks to our joint efforts, the border areas between China and India have on the whole enjoyed peace and stability over the past 30 years and more. What has happened proves that as long as we respect and accommodate each other’s concerns, and insist on managing differences through dialogues instead of confrontation, we are surely able to properly handle the boundary question, and to reduce its impact on our bilateral relations to the minimum level.

    The Border Defence Cooperation Agreement signed last year represents further efforts by the two sides to strengthen communication and properly manage differences on the basis of a series of existing mechanisms related to the boundary question. It will help increase direct engagement and mutual trust between the Chinese and Indian border troops and promote peace and tranquillity in the border areas.

    It is unavoidable that between neighbours, there might be certain issues left from history or some differences in immediate interests. However, let me emphasise that China and India have much more strategic consensus than differences, and cooperation is our top priority. No country can choose its neighbour, but friendship may be fostered. Certain issues may not be avoided, but innovative answers could be found. One cannot rewrite history, but the future is in our hands.

    On the trade front, both sides have been discussing setting up China-dedicated industrial parks in India. What is the current status?

    To carry out cooperation on industrial zones is one of the important agreements reached between leaders of the two countries. An important piece of experience we have drawn from China’s sustained and rapid economic growth over the past 30 years and more is the setting up of development zones to attract foreign investment with preferential policies and promote cluster development of industries. China is willing to share its experience and cooperate with India in this regard.

    At the current stage, competent authorities of the two countries are negotiating on relevant agreements, which are expected to be finalised and signed soon. China has sent a delegation to India to inspect the prospective sites of the zones. To my knowledge, some Chinese businesses are already on the move and have begun construction on the ground. We hope that India will introduce more preferential policies and investment facilitation for Chinese businesses so that we can push for early, substantive outcome of such cooperation and foster signature projects of China-India practical cooperation.

    China recently suffered a series of terror attacks. Considering the increasing and common challenges faced by both countries in this regard, do you see any room for India and China to do more on counterterrorism cooperation?

    Recently, China was hit by a number of serious violent terrorist attacks. The Indian government publicly stated its position immediately after the attacks, standing together with China and condemning the terrorist attacks. China highly appreciates India’s position.

    China and India, both being victims of terrorism, share common interests and face similar challenges in counter-terrorism, and enjoy broad prospects for cooperation in this area. The two sides have already had good cooperation in terrorism-related issues, including policy exchange and joint exercises. Going forward, China stands ready to deepen counter-terrorism cooperation with India to better safeguard the common security interests of the two countries.

    More consensus than differences with India, says Chinese Minister - The Hindu
     
    Peter likes this.
  2.  
  3. mattster

    mattster Respected Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,048
    Likes Received:
    518
    Location:
    California

    China has no interest in solving the border issue.

    It uses the border as leverage against India to bully India. Its a simple but effective 2 pronged approach. The East they can create problems on the border, and on the West they use the Pakis - the perpetual terror machine.

    Only those who are retarded think China wants to solve the border.
    If they wanted to solve - it would have been done 30 years ago.
     
  4. Peter

    Peter Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,218
    Likes Received:
    1,130
    Location:
    Kolkata
    On China bhai-bhai day, Modi serves up 3S

    New Delhi, June 8: Prime Minister Narendra Modi today stressed that if India were to compete with China, it would need to acquire and finesse the three S’s: skill, scale and speed.

    Speaking a day before his meeting with Chinese foreign minister Wang Yi, Modi said: “Spardha hai (competition exists), we have to recognise that. We need to have the skill, scale and speed to meet the spardha.”

    He added: “When we think of trains, our mental canvas only extends to express trains but not to bullet trains. We need to think on a large scale; our thinking has to intellectually expand onto a huge canvas.”

    Modi held his focus so tight on his version of development that he recast the original symbolism of the three colours on the Indian national flag, replacing abstract and timeless ideas with everyday material concerns.

    So, the green that denotes prosperity signified to Modi the urgent need for a “second green revolution” that would stand for “enhanced agri-productivity, value multipliers, the use of more refined agro-technology and decentralisation of warehousing”.

    The white, symbolising truth, peace and purity, turned into a call for another “white revolution” that would not only look at increasing milk production but on creating health systems for cattle. Under a programme Modi had introduced, Gujarat is replete with eye camps for cattle.

    As for saffron — a colour that Modi said “kayeeyon ke kaan khada kar dega” (would get many to prick up their ears) because of its association with the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh’s Bhagwa Dhwaj (saffron flag) — it has been deemed to stand for sacrifice and renunciation.

    Modi interpreted it as the colour of “solar energy” or “Surya oorja”. He turned it into the context for a “saffron revolution” that would have renewable energy sources like solar power (again propagated and used in Gujarat) to meet India’s energy requirements.

    The navy blue Ashok Chakra at the flag’s centre was, to India’s second President S. Radhakrishnan, the wheel of the “law of dharma (virtue)”. To Modi, it is the harbinger of a “blue revolution” signifying the commercial prospects of fisheries, including those breeding exotic species.

    If the bullet trains that sprint across much of Southeast Asia were one prong of Modi’s prescription for getting India on a par with China, he bemoaned the absence of the concept of “speed” in India.

    “What kind of fuel do we use that our vehicles run in reverse gear instead of speeding if that fuel is put inside?” he asked.

    As for skill, he linked the idea to India’s “demographic dividend”.

    “Imagine, 65 per cent of our population is below 35 and we have a youth power that contains the largest market for skill development and enhancement. This market is crying to be tapped. There are nurses, paramedics and, most importantly, teachers whose skills need to be refined,” he said.

    “Can a country ever think of exporting teachers? Yes, it can, because a trader who travels abroad only brings back dollars and pounds. A teacher influences an entire generation of human beings.”

    He added: “Our IIMs are focused on minting potential CEOs who can earn Rs 2 (crore) and (Rs) 3 crore packages. Yet ask these CEOs what they want for their children. In one voice, they will say, ‘The best education; the best teachers’.

    “It is sad that teaching is regarded as a second or third career option. Someone who can’t make the grade as a doctor or an engineer says, ‘Okay, I’ll become a teacher’.

    “That mindset has to change. From Class X or XII, students must start thinking, ‘Yes, I will go into teaching’.”

    Modi said that high on his reforms agenda was a shift from building highways to building “i-ways” and optical fibre networks, and creating 100 “smart” cities that would open up windows for job creation and change.

    “In the past, cities were built along riverbanks. They are now built along highways. In future, they will be built along a different pattern, based on the availability of optical fibre networks and next-generation infrastructure,” he said.

    Modi’s speech came at the launch of Getting India Back on Track: An Action Agenda for Reform, a compendium of essays edited by Bibek Debroy, Ashley J. Tellis and Reece Trevor. It’s been published by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, with a foreword by Ratan Tata.

    Tellis is a senior associate and Trevor a research assistant at Carnegie. Debroy is an economist and a professor at Delhi’s Centre for Policy Research.

    Debroy was in the news in 2005 when he wrote a paper that marked Gujarat as the number one state in terms of economic laissez-faire, measured on variables such as governmental non-interference, favourable legal structures and the security of property rights.

    Debroy was then a research director at the Rajiv Gandhi Institute for Contemporary Research. The paper was put out by the Rajiv Gandhi Foundation, which is chaired by Sonia Gandhi and has Rahul and Priyanka on the board of trustees and the executive committee.

    It was published at a time the Congress had stepped up its campaign against Modi and his development “claims” before the 2007 state elections.

    There was a howl of protest from the Gujarat Congress and within the central party unit against the Foundation’s link to the “pro-Modi” document. Debroy, thought to be close to the Gandhis, quit his job.

    He turned into a vocal proponent of Modi’s Gujarat template and became a regular at the state government’s events, notably the biennial “Vibrant Gujarat” industrial summit.

    Modi’s official Twitter account commended the book because it “talks about getting India back on the path of good governance and development, subjects that are very close to the PM”.

    Wang-Sushma talks

    Wang and external affairs minister Sushma Swaraj today discussed the “perennial” bilateral issues at a “cordial, useful, productive and substantive” meeting in New Delhi that lasted three hours, a PTI report said.

    The agenda is believed to have included the boundary dispute, incursions, issuance of stapled visas by China to a certain category of Indians, Beijing’s construction of dams on the Brahmaputra and increased Chinese investments.

    Wang praised the new government saying it had injected new vitality into an ancient civilisation.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    http://www.telegraphindia.com/1140609/jsp/nation/story_18492854.jsp#.U5UyUPmSw2w
     
  5. AVERAGE INDIAN

    AVERAGE INDIAN EXORCIST Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Messages:
    2,762
    Likes Received:
    2,718
    Location:
    Detroit MI
    dude every body knows it they are not interested in solving the issues that for sure but no leader in the world stage admits openly that we will go to war or we have expansion plans and so on the above statements are routine and will be in future too its all diplomatic B.S and the truth will be always the other way
     
  6. mattster

    mattster Respected Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 30, 2009
    Messages:
    1,048
    Likes Received:
    518
    Location:
    California
    I understand that the Indian establishment knows this and its all for show - but why does India always roll out the diplomatic red carpet for these Chinese diplomats. Treat them like a low level diplomats.

    The Chinese want to screw you and but they still want you to buy their products - Why can't India use the heavy trade deficit in favor of China for leverage.
    Why is all the leverage so heavily in favor of China.......does India have no card that it can play ?
     
  7. AVERAGE INDIAN

    AVERAGE INDIAN EXORCIST Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2012
    Messages:
    2,762
    Likes Received:
    2,718
    Location:
    Detroit MI
    India’s foreign policy is, unfortunately, not dictated by national interests alone, but increasingly by coalition party interests. Coalition governments, now a regular feature in India’s political landscape, are usually formed after tough horse-trading and accommodate the regional coalition partners’ political agenda that can be at variance with the broader national interest.

    Present-day Indian politicians resort to appeasement, which is interpreted as a sign of weakness and helplessness by China’s Stalinist indoctrinated senior army officers. Peace between nations is a wonderful thing, but it becomes a futile quest for the Holy Grail when one side follows it and the other shows scant respect for it

    The lack of aggression in our culture or psyche has and is playing havoc in our foreign policy, military affairs, internal affairs and every sphere of influence. We are docile and mute spectators to Chinas aggressive designs and Pakistans sinister, belligerent behaviour. Chinas open intimidation that it can divide Indian into 20-30 pieces and its brazen call to assist the insurgent regional groups in India to create “independent nation states of their own, out of India, or Pakistans 26/11 carnage in the heart of India, have united us and moved us to tears but not to action.

    We are not a war mongering nation and this is not a war cry but we the people and our leaders should not forget that danger is lurking in the corner. hope its not too late:mod:
     

Share This Page