Mekong river patrol: China, Thailand, Laos, Myanmar

Discussion in 'China' started by amoy, Aug 25, 2013.

  1. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Operation "Safe River" crushes Mekong drug gangs, says China - CNN.com

    [​IMG] Mekong river patrol: China, Thailand, Laos, Myanmar | Bangkok Post: learning
     
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  3. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    Drug trafficking is a serious problem in this region. We also have this problem especially in the Indo-Myanmar border here in northeast, where these drug lords fund and support terrorists in my region. Not just drugs but human trafficking big time. We often wonder how these terrorist groups survive and who finances them, well it is these drug and human trafficking groups that make hell load of money and terrorize people.
     
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  4. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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  5. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    I would like to see data on the ultimate destination of the drugs.
     
  6. Tshering22

    Tshering22 Sikkimese Saber Senior Member

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    I don't have the data of that but probably a google search might help you out.

    Most of the drugs and women go into places like Thailand where drugs and women are the key shady attractions and also in countries like Malaysia and Indonesia where though drug laws are harsh but still massive drugs get trafficked.

    Not to mention in India as well through our states in the northeast borders with Myanmar. Myanmar is the second largest producer of illegal drugs after Afghanistan and a lot of drugs move into this region. The drug cartels in the region are as ruthless as Taliban.
     
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  7. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Four Mekong nations join forces to tackle drug trafficking - The Nation

    Laos, Thailand, Myanmar and China have agreed to beef up their coordination efforts to crack down on illegal drug trafficking along the Mekong River.

    The four countries have set up the Safe Mekong Coordination Centre to strengthen their information exchange and have carried out inspections to observe anti-drug trafficking efforts along the river. The move comes after authorities from the four countries acknowledged that the drug problem on the Mekong affects their national security and stability.

    Chief of Bokeo provincial Police Headquarters, Colonel Lamphay Yotpaphay, told Vientiane Times on Monday that the centre will enable authorities in the four countries to consolidate their efforts to combat the drug trade.

    According to a Chiang Rai Times report, millions of methamphetamine pills are transported yearly along the Mekong.

    Chief of the Mekong Riverine Unit in Chiang Rai province, Capt Phanu Rattanananthawathi, said the number of arrests in the area was quite low because authorities in each country patrol their own territorial waters.

    Capt Phanu said drugs are mainly smuggled in from these countries on cargo ships. Couriers smuggled between 200 and 300 million speed pills and 3,500 kilogrammes of crystal methamphetamine just last year.

    Personnel stationed at the centre will start their patrols at the same time on each section of the Mekong. Along an 85 kilometre section of the river there are 10 spots which need special attention.

    The main focus areas are Chiang Rai’s Golden Triangle, an area near the borders of Myanmar, Laos and Thailand, the fourth Thai-Lao Friendship Bridge, which connects Chiang Rai’s Chiang Khong district and the Lao town of Houayxay, and ports along the river such as Chiang Saen, Hiran Nakhon and Lan Chang.

    Representatives of the four countries meet every six months to review their cooperation and set plans for the year ahead.

    Colonel Lamphay said "We met in Bokeo province last month to discuss how we could strengthen our cooperation and better deal with drug issues in our region."
     
  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    China has already suffered because of Opium.

    [​IMG]

    It cannot allow the country to sink again.
     
  9. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    China FM: Countries along Mekong significant partners - CCTV News - CCTV.com English

    A smart move to enhance ties with the Mekong subgroup that has overland links with China in ASEAN :thumb:

    [​IMG]
     
  10. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    'China, Thailand Plus One': Japanese, South Korean, Chinese companies flocking to Mekong region- Nikkei Asian Review

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    Preparations are underway to launch operations in the Phnom Penh Special Economic Zone.

    TOKYO -- The economic zone in the basin of the Mekong River is starting to thrive as a key location for businesses pursuing so-called "China or Thailand Plus One" strategies.

    Japanese, Chinese and South Korean companies are flocking to the area to take advantage of inexpensive labor, raising a question of whether they and other foreign companies will leave the zone for the sake of "Mekong Plus One" strategies if local wages rise.

    Attractive integration

    Ando, a well-established maker of small articles for Japanese kimono in Kyoto, manufactures in Pakse, a major city in southern Laos. To the sound of local popular music, some 60 young women weave braided cords with Japanese looms, sew drawstring purses and examine the quality of products at the Ando plant.

    Operation manuals are written in Japanese. The women workers include nine who have completed a three-month training program in Japan and speak basic Japanese.

    Ando built the Laos plant at a cost of some $500,000 and began operating it in 2014. Founded in 1923, Ando already had plants in Kyoto and China but added the Laos plant because, as third-generation CEO Ichiro Ando put it, "We'd be in trouble if something happened in China, and we find the integration of Southeast Asia attractive."

    The comment symbolizes the "China Plus One" strategy. Japanese companies have grown wary of operations in China due to rising wages and anti-Japan sentiment and begun seeking "Plus One" locations.

    Ando picked Laos as his company's Plus One location because factory workers in major cities there earn around $100 a month, compared with more than $500 in Beijing.

    He also found the integration of Southeast Asia attractive because of Laos's geographical features.

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    A worker weaves a braided cord for Japanese kimono at Ando's plant in Pakse, Laos.

    Laos is an inland country that borders five countries, including China, Thailand and Vietnam.

    When the ASEAN Economic Community starts up at the end of 2015, customs duties will be lowered within the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. Exporters will be able to choose convenient ports, whether in Thailand, Vietnam or other ASEAN members, depending on their products' destination.

    As labor expenses are also rising in Thailand, many businesses recognize the need for a "Thailand Plus One" strategy. Located on the opposite side of the Mekong River, Laos is an attractive alternative to Thailand for companies that want to cut payroll costs.

    [​IMG]

    A plant operated by Nikon, the Japanese manufacturer of optics and imaging products, in Savannakhet, Laos's second largest city only four hours' drive from Pakse, is a typical Thailand Plus One operation.

    While the plant is responsible for labor-intensive production of parts for single-lens reflex cameras, Nikon brings them to its plant in Thailand for assembling into advanced cameras for sale as popular made-in-Thailand, rather than Laos, products.

    The inland location of Laos has been a major disadvantage preventing the country from having sea routes to establish ties with the rest of the world. But the disadvantage will quickly turn into an advantage after the integration of the region.

    Recognizing Laos's strategic location, Toyota Boshoku, Mitsubishi Materials, Aderans and many other Japanese companies have begun operating in the country in recent years.

    Drawbacks too

    But not everything is rosy in Laos. Unlike Japan, Laos is a socialist country, which poses problems that Japanese companies sometimes struggle with.

    According to the 2014 corruption index compiled by Transparency international, a German nongovernmental organization that monitors corporate and political corruption. Of the 174 countries in the ranking, Laos came 145th, much lower than China's 100th place.

    The widespread corruption makes it difficult for foreign businesses to operate smoothly. But Laos's attractions more than offset its disadvantages.

    [​IMG]
    Kolao Group boasts "Korean Technology" on its motorcycles, like the one pictured here in Savannakhet, Laos.

    A large number of South Korean companies have set up shop in Laos. The Kolao Group, for example, has a noticeable presence in Savannakhet. The group's name combines "Korea" and "Laos" and both countries' national flags fly in front of its plant's main entrance.

    Kolao was founded by a South Korean and has grown by importing products such as automobiles from Hyundai Motor. Motorcycles produced by Kolao carry a label that says proudly, "Korean Technology."

    Like Japan, South Korea is struggling with a dwindling birthrate and aging population. With domestic demand stalling, South Korean companies need to develop overseas markets for growth.

    In a sense, Kolao symbolizes the situation of South Korea, as it was founded in 1997 when the country was caught in a currency crisis.

    The toughest competition involving Japanese and South Korean as well as Chinese companies in the Mekong economic zone is down the river in the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh.

    Cambodia is a leading Plus One candidate as its wage level is almost the same as that of Laos. Japanese retail giant Aeon opened a large-scale shopping center in Phnom Penh last year. Next to the center, hotel chain Toyoko Inn operates a big hotel for businesspeople, reflecting Japanese companies' entries into Phnom Penh.

    Located 20km from the center of the capital is the Phnom Penh Special Economic Zone, featuring corporate and export tax breaks.

    Japanese investment firm Zephyr has a 22% interest in the SEZ and 42 of the 78 companies operating there are Japanese companies including Ajinomoto and Denso.

    The SEZ will offer shares for training on the Cambodia Securities Exchange this summer and use funds from its initial public offering to develop a new SEZ near the border with Thailand in a bid to lure companies promoting Thailand Plus One strategies.

    The CSX, which is owned 45% by the Korea Exchange, has created its trading system and trained the necessary personnel thanks to support from the South Korean bourse. South Korean companies are trying to benefit from Cambodia's economic growth by establishing close ties with the Cambodian government and business community.

    A Korean restaurant facing Phnom Penh International Airport is called Dok Do, the Korean name of South Korea-controlled but Japan-claimed Takeshima island. Though the name of the restaurant was initially believed to be a sign of anti-Japanese sentiment in Cambodia, it more likely suggested the presence of economic tensions between South Korea and Japan.

    Cambodian operations

    Chinese companies, as the push ahead with overseas business expansion in the face of rising costs at home, are also entering Cambodia. They account for the majority of companies operating in the Sihanoukville Special Economic Zone 210km from the capital's center. The zone competes with the Phnom Penh SEZ, which is led by Japanese companies.

    [​IMG]
    A bridge, right, built with Japan's support and another constructed with China's assistance stand side by side over the Tonle Sap River in Phnom Penh.

    The competition between Japan and China is symbolized by two big bridges over the Tonle Sap River in Phnom Penh. The Japan-Cambodia Friendship Bridge, originally built in the 1960s, was destroyed during Cambodia's civil war. It was later rebuilt with Japanese aid. Right beside it is a similar bridge, recently completed with Chinese support.

    Workers recently demonstrated in Phnom Penh, calling for higher wages. The minimum wage in Cambodia has more than doubled over the past three years and will rise further in view of foreign companies' strong interest in the country.

    Laos is in a similar situation. Given its population of nearly 7 million, less than half of Cambodia's, wages may rise sharply as a result of intense competition for workers.

    One is what foreign companies operating in Laos and Cambodia will do when labor cost rises sharply.

    Over the past half century, the sewing industry has shifted operations from the U.S. to Japan, South Korea, China and Southeast Asia in a bid to secure inexpensive labor. If companies pull the plug on operations simply because of wage increases, they will meet fierce protests from societies wishing to protect employment. Businesses cannot thrive unless they coexist in the societies where they operate.

    Hiroshi Uematsu, CEO of the Phnom Penh SEZ, referred to one Japanese manufacturer's strategy as an intriguing outlook for the future. The company has no choice but to make products with low added value in the zone for now, but it plans to increase mechanization by stages to manufacture higher value-added products. The company will "never retreat" from Cambodia, Uematsu quoted it as saying.

    According to the strategy, the company will transfer the production of low value-added products to countries having inexpensive labor but can justify the payment of high wages in Cambodia on its economic development and maintain employment.

    The strategy of contributing to long-term economic growth offers an important clue to companies operating globally as well as countries that accept companies with Plus One strategies.

    ==============================

    Now C-J-K have extended their battle ground to Mekong :shocked:
     
  11. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    video clip - China launches first communication satellite for Laos

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    A rocket carrying the LaoSat-1 satellite blasts off from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Xichang, southwest China's Sichuan Province
    , Nov. 21, 2015. (Xinhua/Qin Haishi)

    BEIJING, Nov. 21 (Xinhua) -- Chinese President Xi Jinping and his Lao counterpart, Choummaly Sayasone, sent each other congratulatory messages on Saturday to mark the successful launch of a Lao communication satellite with a Chinese carrier rocket.

    The satellite, Lao Sat-1, was launched on Saturday at the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in southwest China's Sichuan Province.

    Hailing the Lao Sat-1 project as "a significant manifestation of China-Laos comprehensive strategic cooperative partnership under new circumstances", Xi said it ushers in a new paradigm of cooperation between developing countries in the field of astronautics, and will promote economic development, improve the people's livelihood and facilitate social progress in Laos.
     
  12. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Laos' northern 230 KV power grid put into operation 2015-11-30 01:01:41

    LUANG PRABANG, Laos, Nov. 29 (Xinhua) -- Laos' northern 230 KV grid was put into operation Sunday, a major boost to the country's building of a unified high voltage grid.

    The project was constructed by China Southern Power Grid and it is one of the China-Laos cooperation projects within the Belt and Road initiative proposed by China to enhance regional connectivity.

    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2015-11/30/c_134866617.htm

    The minister said the grid will not only help build a unified national high voltage grid, it will also provide infrastructure for cross-border power transmission.


    ~~Still waters run deep. ~~from my MiPad using tapatalk
     
  13. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    China's railway projects in Thailand, Laos to start

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    China's high-speed railway models on display for the first time, at the China-ASEAN Expo, held in Nanning, capital of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region from Sept. 18 to 21, 2015. [Guo Yiming / China.org.cn]

    China's high-speed railway projects are finally gaining ground in Southeast Asia, as top government officials in Thailand and Laos attending the 12th China-ASEAN Expo indicated the construction in both countries might start before the end of this year.

    Thailand's Deputy Prime Minister Dr. Tanasak Patimapragorn said his country's 840-kilometer project may start this December, linking the northern city of Nong Khai with Bangkok.

    Laos is also determined to have a high-speed railway project with cooperation from China in order to transform the landlocked country, according to its Deputy Prime Minister Somsava Lengsavad who gave a speech in fluent Mandarin during the opening ceremony of the 12th China-ASEAN Expo and Business and Investment Summit on Sept. 18, 2015.

    As Laos' largest investor, China is also going to help launch a man-made satellite for the southeast country, according to Somasava, who saw both projects as being of historical and strategic significance to the country whose lack of infrastructure remains a massive headache.

    The Thai Deputy Prime Minister added that China's "Belt and Road" initiative prompted the realization of the railway project which had gone through 10 years of tough negotiations.

    China is looking to build a high-speed line from Kunming all the way down to Singapore, passing through Laos, Thailand and Malaysia, a project that would increase China's GDP and those of the involved nations by US$375 billion, according to China Railway Corp.

    [​IMG]
    http://china.org.cn/business/2015-09/22/content_36649035.htm


    ~~Still waters run deep. ~~from my MiPad using tapatalk
     
  14. aliyah

    aliyah Regular Member

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    behind all drug trafficking there are intelligence agency's . without there help no trafficking can't take place
     
  15. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Plan cements Mekong cooperation

    China and five other countries along the 5,000-km Lancang-Mekong River agreed on Wednesday on a sweeping plan to deepen cooperation and build a comprehensive connectivity network covering railways, highways, waterways, ports and aviation.

    China also promised 10 billion yuan ($1.54 billion) in preferential loans and a credit line of $10 billion to support infrastructure and production capacity projects in cooperation with the countries.

    Premier Li Keqiang announced the loans and the agreement in Sanya, Hainan province, at the first meeting of the leaders from the six countries along the river.
    [​IMG]
    The Lancang-Mekong Cooperation Leaders' Meeting also discussed the use of water resources, and China vowed to take measures to support improvement of living conditions in downstream areas along the river.

    The Mekong River, whose upper part is known in China as the Lancang River, is an important water source for the five countries on the Indochinese Peninsula — Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam — and it nourishes a population of 326 million.

    Beijing announced last week that it will provide an emergency water supply through April 10 to countries along the river to deal with drought.

    "That demonstrates China's sincerity toward improving living conditions in countries along the Mekong River," Premier Li said at a joint news conference after the meeting.

    He announced that China will use $200 million from its South-South Cooperation Assistance Fund to help the five nations to realize the targets set in the United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. China also will provide $300 million to support small and medium-sized cooperation projects proposed by the six countries.

    Additionally, it will set up a Lancang-Mekong water resources cooperation center and an environmental cooperation center to promote green development.

    Li suggested holding leaders' meetings every two years, foreign ministers' meetings every year and occasional meetings of high-ranking officials and working teams.

    Thai Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha, who co-chaired the meeting with Li, called the gathering a "new chapter" in the Lancang-Mekong cooperation process.

    Former Chinese ambassador to Cambodia Zhang Jinfeng said, "The mechanism will not only benefit the six nations, but also boost the integration of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations."

    China is the biggest trading partner of Cambodia, Myanmar, Thailand and Vietnam, and the biggest source of investment in Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. China's bilateral trade with the five nations reached $193.9 billion last year.
     

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