Manipur blockade to be called off

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by Oracle, Jun 12, 2010.

  1. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    Manipur's development blockade
    June 12, 2010 04:18 IST


    The people of Manipur have had a hard summer. The price of petrol in the black market is Rs 150 per litre. Diesel costs Rs 110. A filled LPG cylinder ranges between Rs 1,500 and Rs 2,000--when you can get it. The price of kerosene has gone up from Rs 35 to Rs 65 over the last few days. Militant groups--whether Kuki, Naga or Meitei--are raking it in: they levy a tax of Rs 2 on every Rs 100 spent in the state and this has recently been raised to Rs 5. Traders too are making hay. The only people who're hurting are ordinary, hapless citizens, waiting for life-saving medicines to be airlifted or wheat or rice.

    The All-Naga Students' Association launched the blockade in Manipur on April 12 to protest against elections to six autonomous district councils in the hills. The Nagas, who inhabit the hills, feel the Manipur (Hill Area) District Council Act (Third Amendment) 2008, under which the election was to have been held, takes away the powers of the tribal people. The Meiteis, mostly Vaishnavites who occupy the valley and are a dominant power centre in Manipur, would like to bring the Nagas to heel. Differences between the Nagas and the Meiteis, between Naga tribes like HoHo, Angami, etc, and between communities like Kuki and Naga have been deliberately deepened and manipulated by political leaders as part of identity and caste politics in the North East. So, when the Nagas objected to the district council elections on the ground that the Act under which the polls were being held undermined the traditional tribal elders' authority, the Meiteis, led by Okram Ibobi Singh, chief minister of Manipur, merely shrugged and said: "Do your worst." This led to a week-long blockade, initially.

    Left to themselves, the Nagas may have tired after a spell, giving up the blockade. But an incident intervened. The National Socialist Council of Nagaland-Isak Muivah chief Thuingaleng Muivah was in India, and in the newly discovered spirit of friendship with New Delhi, expressed the wish to go to his village, Somdal, in Manipur's Ukhrul district.

    For those who don't know much about the politics of the Nagas, Muivah, who is considered the supreme leader of the Nagas and has been living in exile outside India to fight for a Naga "nation", is now holding talks with India to create a Greater Nagaland or Nagalim--a state carved out of the Naga-inhabited areas of Manipur, Nagaland, Assam and other states in the North East. Obviously, no state is going to allow this. Nor is the central government too keen to roil the waters, but understandably, it would rather that Muivah continued to hold a dialogue with it, instead of the government of Myanmar.

    Anyway, Muivah's proposed visit to Somdal made the Manipur government (which is a Congress (I) one, by the way) see red. On the day he reached the border of Manipur and Nagaland, the Manipur police commandoes opened fire, killing some Nagas and badly injuring members of a welcome party of Naga elders, there to escort Muivah.

    Why did the central government permit Muivah to go to Manipur? As Home Minister P Chidambaram said, no one can be prevented from travelling to the village of his birth if he wants to, no matter where the village might be. The incident hardened positions. After a couple of days, Muivah was persuaded to return without visiting his village, and a tense situation was defused. The Meiteis, meanwhile, have decided to show the Nagas who the boss is. The Nagas, on their part, say they control the two national highways that lead to Manipur and they will decide who and what will use the roads.

    A cabinet committee on security discussed this issue and decided to deal with the situation very, very tactfully. Thankfully, Muivah doesn't believe that the blockade is an India-backed conspiracy, yet. But a combination of the persuasive powers of Pranab Mukherjee, Chidambaram and A K Antony was unable to make Okram Ibobi Singh a little more charitably disposed towards Muivah: He flatly refused to let him visit.

    And why should he? Okram Ibobi Singh is the current darling of Manipuris. They see their gallant chief minister ready to battle with uncivilised Nagas to retain the "sovereignty" of the state.

    The irony should be lost on no one. It is under this very chief minister that the roads and highways leading to Manipur are in a state of such disrepair that the wheels of trucks frequently get stuck in the rutted mud. Manipur raises no revenue: It gets 90 per cent of its development funds from the Centre. Whatever happens to this money. But these questions, no one wants to ask. It is the rights of the Meiteis that must be protected.

    There isn't much that the Centre can do, beyond watching and counselling. Although mediation is on, there is no evidence that the blockade is going to be lifted soon. Why can't the political issue in the North East be development, instead of identity? All Indians must ask themselves this question.

    Aditi Phadnis in New Delhi

    http://news.rediff.com/report/2010/jun/12/manipur-development-blockade.htm
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 14, 2010
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  3. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    What stopping GOI to airlift supplies to Manipur capital.If they can do it for afghanistan then why not manipur??Really GOI at center are bunch of idiots who allow situation to get out of hand first then react violently through forces.
     
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  4. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    Do you really think we need to airlift goods to Manipur? A couple of sticks and those errant mobs will disperse.
     
  5. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    Cross post

    Manipur vehicles not to ply through Nagaland

    IMPHAL, June 12 (PTI) - Buses and trucks of Manipur will not ply through Nagaland until the Centre and the Nagaland government pay compensation for vehicles damaged during the ongoing indefinite economic blockade on National Highways, the Transporters and Drivers Council (TDC) said today.
    "Several non-government organisations and militant outfits have been extorting money and harassing drivers, vehicle owners and passengers from Manipur in Nagaland for many years but we (TDC) have been tolerating it," TDC spokesman and general secretary NG Haridas told reporters here.

    Several vehicles were destroyed during the ongoing economic blockade on NH - 39 (Imphal-Kohima-Dimapur) passing through a major portion of Nagaland and NH - 53 (Imphal-Jiribam-Silchar) by All Naga Students' Association Manipur (ANSAM), Haridas alleged.

    The decision not to ply trucks and buses was taken during an emergency meeting of the council last evening.

    http://www.assamtribune.com/scripts/detailsnew.asp?id=jun1210/at044
     
  6. anoop_mig25

    anoop_mig25 Senior Member Senior Member

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    i can only say that present upa regime attitude of leaving the problem rather then solving it. the problem dies its natural death once our news channel gets something other. look at the problems such as obc count/use of army&aif in war aginst naxals/reservations for women all left for future by making some commeties etc. i is congress attitude .rather facing the problem and try to solve it they would rather avoid it
     
  7. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    supplies are urgently needed.for stick mobilization takes time.
     
  8. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    Anoop, what you said is true. However, blaming the current UPA govt does not make any sense. It has been the attitude of GoI from 1947, whoever has been in power, which has contributed to the dismal state of North East. But things are improving on the ground, at a snails pace, but yes.
     
  9. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    Then I would say GoI is sleeping. It is almost 2 months.

    Pardon me and my confidence, but people in the right position and in NE could have controlled this in 2 days.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2010
  10. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    [​IMG]
    Vehicles form a queue for oil near a petrol pump in Manipur state capital Imphal on June 9, 2010. Residents of the remote state in Manipur are running out of essential supplies as an economic blockade imposed by tribal rebels nears its 60th day, officials say. Several Naga tribal groups have blocked the main highway into Manipur state since April 12 to protest against a government decision preventing their separatist leader, Thuingaleng Muivah, from visiting his birthplace. (AFP)

    [​IMG]
    Manipuri women preventing traders from transporting food items to Naga-inhabited hill districts in reaction to the economic blockade on NH-39 by Naga groups, at a bus stand in Imphal on Saturday, May 15, 2009. (PTI)

    [​IMG]
    A joint team of Imphal East Police and Assam Rifles patrolling a hilly road to prevent entry of NSCN(I-M) General Secretary Thuingaleng Muivah to Manipur, at Liyai in Senapati district of the state bordering Nagaland on Friday, June 11, 2010. (PTI)

    [​IMG]
    Manipur women march with a banner during a protest against NSCN (I-M) general secretary Thuingaleng Muivah's entry in the state, in Imphal on Saturday, May 29, 2010. (PTI)

    [​IMG]
    Security men fire teargas shells to disperse protesters who were demonstrating against their deployment to check the entry of NSCN-IM Secretary General Thuingaleng Muivah into Manipur, at Mao gate on Thursday, May 6, 2009. (PTI)

    [​IMG]
    Members of Greater Guwahati Manipuri Association (GGMA) take part in a peace rally in the wake of prevailing tension in Manipur over NSCN (IM) leader Thuingaleng Muivah's visit to the state, in Guwahati on Tuesday, May 11, 2009. (PTI)

    [​IMG]
    Nagaland Chief Minister Neiphiu Rio (R) shakes hands with NSCN (I-M) leader Thuingaleng Muivah at Viswema village in Nagaland on Friday, May 7, 2009. Muivah is camping at Viswema after the Manipur government barred his entry into the state. (PTI)

    [​IMG]
    Naga women and children sit at a temporary shelter for displaced Nagas from Manipur state, at Khuzama village, in the northeastern Indian state of Nagaland on Friday, May 7 2010. Police fired tear gas and clashed on Thursday with hundreds of people trying to remove barricades put up by authorities to prevent Thuingaleng Muivah, the leader of the separatist National Socialist Council of Nagaland, from entering Manipur state in northeast India, officials said. Situation has been tense in the Manipur-Nagaland border area ever since. (AP)

    [​IMG]
    People collecting ration, being distributed by the FCS department, as there is shortage of essential commodities due to economic blockade two National Highways by ANSAM, in Imphal on Tuesday, May 18, 2009. (PTI)

    [​IMG]
    female cadre of the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN-IM) helps a colleague tie a belt to hold ammunition, at the central headquarters of the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN-IM), at Hebron, on the outskirts of Dimapur, in the northeastern Indian state of Nagaland, Wednesday, May 5, 2010. India is offering wide autonomy to the group though it has already rejected the rebels' demand for an independent homeland in northeastern India bordering Myanmar, where most of the 2 million Nagas live. (AP)
     
  11. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    [​IMG]
    People line up their vehicles at a petrol pump demanding fuel, in Imphal on Tuesday, May 25, 2009. Essential commodities, including petrol, in Manipur are in acute shortage due to the economic blockade on NH-39 and NH-53 by a Naga students' group. (PTI)

    [​IMG]
    Supporters of Thuingaleng Muivah, General secretary NSCN(IM), blocking National Highway No. 39 with stones and burning firewoods in protest against Manipur government's decision of not allowing the leader to visit his home town Ukhrul, in Senapati on Friday, May 7, 2009. (PTI)

    [​IMG]
    Residents waiting for their turn to collect rice rationed by the state government following the economic blockade on NH-39 by Naga groups, in Imphal on Tuesday, May 18, 2009. (PTI)

    [​IMG]

    Police trying to pacify students and activists of Nagaland who tried to storm Manipur Bhavan after Manipur government denied entry of Thuingaleng Muivah, leader of NSCN (IM) into the state, in New Delhi on Thursday, May 6, 2009. (PTI)

    [​IMG]
    Fire men extinguish a police vehicle torched by protesters during a demonstration against deployment of security personnel to check the entry of NSCN-IM Secretary General Thuingaleng Muivah into Manipur, at Mao gate on Thursday, May 6, 2009. (PTI)

    [​IMG]
    Naga students and activists holding a candlelight service to show solidarity with NSCN (IM) leader Thuingaleng Muivah, who was barred from entering Manipur, at India Gate in New Delhi on Sunday, May 9, 2009. (PTI)

    [​IMG]
    Naga Students' Union Guwahati (NSUG) taking part in a rally to condemn killing of students during police firing at Manipur's Mao gate, in Guwahati on Saturday, May 8, 2009. Police fired on protesters who demonstrated against Manipur's ban on the entry of NSCN (IM) leader Thuingaleng Muivah into the state. (PTI)

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    A view of the trucks stranded on NH 39 due to the indefinite economic blockade of All Naga Students Association Manipur at Mao in Senapati district of Manipur on Friday. (PTI)

    [​IMG]
    Manipur police commandos detain and question locals after a rally against the Manipur state government's decision to prevent Thuingaleng Muivah, the leader of separatist National Socialist Council of Nagaland, from entering Manipur state in India's northeast, in Mao, about 30 kilometers (20 miles) from Kohima, capital of the northeastern Indian state of Nagaland, Thursday, May 6, 2010. Several people were injured in clashes with police near Manipur's land border with Nagaland state, said a Manipur state government spokesman. However, a spokesman for the Naga People's Movement for Human Rights, said at least two people were killed in police firing in the area. (AP)
     
  12. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    So, you all have seen now, how openly they roam with AK's. That is North East mates.
     
  13. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    [​IMG]
    Onlookers stand beside damaged cars outside the Manipur Bhavan (House) in New Delhi May 7, 2010. Hundreds of 'Naga Students Union Delhi' (NSUD) students on Friday protested outside the Manipur Bhavan against the government's refusal to allow T. Muivah, leader of Socialist Council of Nagaland-Isak Muivah (NSCN-IM) to visit his ancestral village state, according to local media. (REUTERS)

    [​IMG]
    Manipur security personnel stand guard as they block the highway bordering Manipur border at Mao, about 30 kilometers (19 miles) from Kohima, capital of the northeastern Indian state of Nagaland on Thursday, May 6, 2010. Police on Thursday fired tear gas to disperse hundreds of people who tried to remove barricades put up by authorities to prevent a Naga separatist leader from entering Manipur state in India's northeast, officials said. Ravi Hemadri, a spokesman for the Naga People's Movement for Human Rights, said at least two people were killed in police firing in the area. (AP)
     
  14. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Centre mulls extra forces to clear Manipur blockade

    13 Jun 2010, 0032 hrs IST,TNN


    ManipurNSCNT MuivahNSFEconomic blockadeNaga protesters

    NEW DELHI: The Centre is mulling sending additional paramilitary personnel to Manipur to assist the state in clearing the blockade on two national highways if the agitating Nagas continue to stick to their plan to cut off the state from the rest of the northeast.

    People in the state are facing problems due to shortage of essential commodities because of the blockade on NH-39 (Imphal-Dimapur) and 53 (Imphal-Jiribam) by Naga protesters who have been agitating for over a month against Manipur’s decision of not allowing NSCN (IM) leader T Muivah to visit his ancestral village.

    Sources in the home ministry said that though the state police personnel were there, nothing substantial had been achieved on the ground. The Center would have to send additional paramilitary personnel if the situation did not improve, they added.

    Organisations like the Joint Parliamentary Working Committee of Nagaland Assembly, Churches of Nagaland and Manipur and All Assam Students Union had already appealed to the Naga Students’ Federation (NSF) to lift the blockade on the two highways on humanitarian ground.

    “We expect the Naga leaders will listen to such appeal. Otherwise, we will have to take strict action by using force”, said a senior official here. Union home secretary G K Pillai had visited Manipur to take stock of the situation last week.
     
  15. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Isn't National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN-IM) a banned group???? India's east and north east is like wild west of pakistan if they can roam with AKs freely.
     
  16. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    /\/\/\ Banned, but they are in ceasefire with the GoI. During a ceasefire, GoI takes care of all their cadres food, supplies etc which runs into crores of rupees a year. During a ceasefire brandishing weapons are not allowed, nor is extortion or any other activity as rules of the ceasefire agreement state. But laws are like asses in NE, they sell cheap.
     
  17. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Manipur Blockade: A Tale of Vested Political Interests and Exclusivist Narratives



    Namrata Goswami

    June 10, 2010
    In a liberal democracy like India, pluralism should ideally inform everyday life. Sadly, this is not always the case on the ground. The latest blockade of the National Highway 39 (NH-39) connecting Imphal (Manipur) with Kohima (Nagaland) by the Naga Students’ Federation (NSF) and the All Naga Students’ Association Manipur (ANSAM) since April 12, 2010 is one such example of an exclusivist and intolerant attitude, unacceptable in a democracy like India that celebrates ‘unity in diversity’. It not only goes against the very idea of ‘humanitarianism’ but is also based on deep seated ‘meaningless’ ethnic hatreds of the other. Worst of all, when the rest of India and the world are marching ahead in an interactive and inclusive way despite numerous odds, the people of Manipur and Nagaland are marching backward: towards nostalgia, territorial exclusivity, xenophobia and ‘ghetto like’ tendencies which are out of sync with the modern world.

    [​IMG]

    Why has this crisis suddenly come about between Manipur and Nagaland and that too, at this particular juncture? Meiteis and Nagas have been at odds, violently so at times, due to the demand by the Nagas, specifically by armed outfits like the National Socialist Council of Nagalim led by Thuingaleng Muivah and Isaac Chisi Swu [NSCN (IM)] that the four hill districts of Manipur, namely, Chandel, Tamenglong, Senapati and Ukhrul, be included as part of their “Greater Nagalim” (See Map below). Meiteis are wary of this territorial demand as it would result in the loss of 90 per cent of their territory and they being left with just 10 per cent territory comprising of the Imphal valley. Moreover, non-Naga tribes like the Kukis and the Thadous (the largest hill tribe in Manipur) inhabit the hill districts along with the Naga tribes and are against the unification agenda of the NSCN (IM).

    Figure 2: Map of the NSCN (IM)’s Greater Nagalim
    [​IMG]

    Given these differences between Meiteis and Nagas, the present blockade of the NH -39 has come about because of three reasons:-

    First, the blockade was started on April 12, 2010 by ANSAM protesting against the holding of elections to six Autonomous District Councils (ADCs) in the hill districts of Manipur. Over 200,000 voters were exercising their ‘right to vote’ to elect 39 representatives to the ADCs of Chandel, Churachandpur, Ukhrul, Tamenglong, and Senapati districts. These elections were being held after a gap of 20 years. The first phase of the elections was held on May 26, 2010 in Chandel, Churachandpur and Sadar Hills in Manipur. The second phase was held on June 2, 2010 in Ukhrul, Tamenglong and Senapati districts. And this is where the sub-text of inter-ethnic politics is playing out its destructive role. From an inter-ethnic perspective (read Naga versus Meitei), holding of elections to the ADCs especially in Ukhrul, Tamenglong, Senapati and Chandel districts have two significant political implications.

    The participation of the people in the hill districts, especially in Chandel, Ukhrul, Tamenglong and Senapati districts in these elections is a “thumbs down” to the Naga territorial unification agenda as it gives representation to Nagas within Manipur in democratic institutions, in which they will have their due say. It also creates an added fear for armed groups like the NSCN (IM) that the ADC elections could prop up alternative Naga leaders, who may see positive political stakes in being a part of Manipur and thus enjoying enough political autonomy and representation through the ADCs. Significantly, eight houses belonging to the candidates contesting in the ADC elections were attacked at Ukhrul Headquarters on May 31, 2010, just days before the scheduled June 2, 2010 ADC elections to intimidate people and force them to stay away from the election process. Significantly, most of the candidates whose houses were attacked belonged to the Tangkhul tribe that dominates Ukhrul and which supposedly supports the NSCN (IM)’s Nagalim project.
    The Ibobi Singh led Manipur state government has its own vested political agenda as well in this crisis, namely, using the ADC elections to negate the Naga unification demand. Hence, both parties are playing their own political games with the common man caught in between. Consequently, in this Naga-Meitei divide, the voices of tribes like the Kukis, who are supportive of the ADC elections, are being lost.
    Second, when the ongoing crisis over the ADC elections was on, Thuingaleng Muivah, the General Secretary of the NSCN (IM) announced on May 4, 2010 that he intended to visit his native village, Somdal in Ukhrul district. This move was indeed motivated to earn political mileage from the ADC issue as well as visibly demonstrate his commitment to the Nagalim project to Nagas in Ukhrul at a time when many Tangkhul Nagas have started to express scepticism about the NSCN (IM)’s extortions and heavy handed ways. Subsequently, on being denied entry into Manipur by the Manipur state government, the NSCN (IM) led by Muivah also joined the blockade from the first week of May.

    Third, the Naga Students’ Federation, in its latest meeting in the last week of May decided to intensify the blockade of NH-39 as a reaction to the Ibobi Singh Government’s decision to disallow NSF activists from entering Oinam village in Senapati district. Also, the NSF demands the withdrawal of section 144 of CrPC which has been imposed on Naga inhabited areas of Manipur since May 3, 2010.

    The consequences of this blockade are manifold.

    First, it has rekindled ethnic hatred and divides between Nagas and Meiteis so much so that the President of the Naga civil society body, the Naga Hoho (Naga Apex Tribal Council), Keviletuo Kiewhuo stated on May 22, 2010 in Kohima that “we want the total separation of the people, that is the Nagas and the Meiteis. We have to live as different identities, we cannot co-exist anymore." The convener of the Coordination Committee of Naga Civil Society, Neingulo Krome, and its member secretary, Rosemary Dzuvichu, similarly argued that “The Nagas are fully aware that after more than six decades of political struggle, our future are [sic] bound together not only with our neighbours but also with the world’s community in a global village. But if our aspiration to attain our rightful humanity is constantly denied, we would rather face the challenges with the worth of human person than to live with humiliation.”

    Second, the divide has become intensely politicised with the NSCN (IM) General Secretary Muivah and Manipur Chief Minister Ibobi Singh stoking dangerous ethnic divides.

    Third, Manipur is facing a humanitarian tragedy of sorts. One kilogram of rice now costs Rs. 30; a litre of petrol is priced between Rs. 150 and Rs. 200. Diesel is not available in gas stations and a LPG cylinder is priced between Rs. 1000 and Rs. 1500. The Public Distribution System (PDS) is closed. Worse still, the Regional Institute of Medical Sciences and Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences, two main hospitals in Manipur, have stopped functioning due to non-availability of medicines.

    Despite all this, not much has been written in the national media in contrast to the intense media focus on the blockade of the Kashmir valley in August 2008 over the Amarnath land dispute. The Union government’s role in igniting the crisis must be noted as well. When Muivah made his request to visit his village amidst the ADC election crisis in Manipur, and Ibobi Singh agreed, the Centre should have known that this will ignite negative passions amongst the Meiteis, who fear the NSCN (IM)’s agenda of Greater Nagalim. Muivah visiting Manipur during the Naga protests against the ADCs only validates Meitei fears that these areas will one day become a part of Nagalim. The Chief Minister of Manipur also appears to have drawn political mileage out of it by refusing entry to Muivah despite appearing ambiguous when he was first approached on the issue by the Centre.

    What can be done?
    Four steps need to be immediately taken to defuse the ongoing crisis.

    First, the Naga Baptist Church Council has come forward to work towards defusing the crisis in consultation with the Manipur Church. This is perhaps a viable way, given the influence Church leaders enjoy in Naga society.

    Second, the Union and state governments should work together to lift the blockade of a national highway. Such acts should be declared unconstitutional and anyone responsible for it must be held accountable in a court of law and given due punishment for disruption of public life. This will deter future blockades.

    Third, the NH-53, from Silchar in Assam via Jiribam (Manipur) for movement of goods into Manipur is not a realistic option as the terrain is difficult for heavy trucks to ply upon. Airlifting of basic commodities and medicines should therefore be the first option.

    Fourth, a committee of inquiry should be constituted by the Union government, comprising both influential Meiteis and Nagas in order to find ways and means to resolve the crisis quickly.

    While ethnic divides are a reality in pluralistic societies like India, they are not intractable. Divisions of this kind can be handled through a framework of pluralism and inclusive thinking. The first and most important thing to do is to condemn such exclusivist narratives, and work towards meaningful bridging of the divide. For this to happen, one needs to go beyond the local state structures, which feed on ethnic divides for narrow political gains. Societies on both sides have to be brought together. While the Naga Hoho is appreciated for its efforts at reconciliation between Naga tribes, its recent statements about the inevitability of the Meitei-Naga divide smacks of irresponsibility and must be fittingly refuted and condemned as it only makes life difficult for the common man living in these heterogeneous ethnic spaces. Finally, it is social cohesion and determination by local communities to bring about peace that can realistically tide over vested political interests and narrow destructive narratives that seem to be informing the present crisis between Manipur and Nagaland.
     
  18. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    There are certain things center can do urgently...
    1. massive airlift of supplies.
    2.procuring supplies from burma and through bangladesh.
     
  19. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    Point # 1 - I agree with you. However, giving into terrorists demands is not what I think GoI should do.
    Point # 2 - NO. There is no need to involve other countries in a home grown insurgency problem. This is our headache and we can solve it. Period.
     
  20. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    instead of spending $ 1 billion in each of Afghanistan and srilanka without any returns if these idiots in center spend those monies in maoist affected area and north east most of the insurgencies will die natural death.
     
  21. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    point2 :for long india has been taking burma's help in joint military operation against northeast rebel groups which operates from burmese soil into india.so whats wrong in purchasing supplies from burma and transporting them to manipur.Btw khalistan movement died coz of active support to indian govt from pakistan.
     

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