Make them pay for terror

Discussion in 'Internal Security' started by maomao, Jul 10, 2012.

  1. maomao

    maomao Veteran Hunter of Maleecha Senior Member

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    Cramped by outdated laws and fettered by a lack of political will, the UPA regime has failed to tackle terrorism. It must change its mindset.

    The country is not only under attack from foreign terrorists but is also threatened by certain home-grown terror outfits such as the Indian Mujahideen. Unfortunately, the Union Government, by its inaction, has only allowed them to flourish.

    Of course the Constitution guarantees certain freedoms to every citizen. But it does not permit any group or individual to abuse that freedom in a bid to destroy the country. Syed Zabiuddin Ansari, alias Abu Jundal, the terrorist handler who directed the 26/11 attacks in Mumbai and was recently extradited from Saudi Arabia, has claimed that he was instrumental in routing funds for the Lashkar-e-Tayyeba’s sleeper cells in Kerala and Maharashtra through hawala channels, thanks to his network of contacts in Riyadh and Dubai.

    More importantly, he has also revealed that he recruited 50 people during his nearly two-year stay in Saudi Arabia. The recruits were mostly from Pakistan, India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, and have since been inducted into the LeT. Additionally, Ansari also said that he had trained 250 recruits in the LeT’s training camps in Pakistan-Occupied Kashmir. Out of these eight were Indian Muslims who were being trained for another 26/11 type attack on India to be carried out in 2011.

    The media has rightly highlighted Ansari’s role as an Indian Muslim in the 26/11 attack on Mumbai. Such people bring a bad name to the entire Muslim community in India. But it is unlikely that anything significant will come out of the investigation. Remember that under the present Indian laws, no confession made before a police officer is admissible in a court of law, unless there is independent corroborating evidence.

    Unfortunately, since the repeal of Terrorists and Disruptive Activities (Prevention) Act, the Union Government has failed to frame any law to deal with this menace. In fact, New Delhi’s weak-kneed policies have only created a mess all around.

    On the one hand, the Union Minister for Home Affairs blames Pakistan and its military intelligence agency for major terrorists attack in India. On the other hand, the Pakistani High Commissioner thinks nothing before inviting Kashmiri separatists for a meeting that was held earlier this month. Obviously, it was not just a casual social meeting held to exchange pleasantries, but had greater import.

    Speaking of separatists, it is worthy to note that the law on sedition under Section 124A has never been applied to them. Perhaps, it is not entirely surprising then that the process of Islamisation is almost complete in the Kashmir Valley. The Prime Minister believes that Maoist violence is the biggest internal security threat to India. But either he has forgotten or has deliberately chosen not to add jihadi terror, particularly in Kashmir, to the list of threats.

    Consequently, I do not believe that blaming the ISI or Pakistan for India’s troubles will help solve the country’s problem. This is because the fault lies in us — in apathetic and anaemic approach towards jihadi terror.

    In Kashmir, for instance, the writ of the State Government does not run beyond Srinagar because the regime has willingly capitulated before the terrorists. So much so that the day after the Government removed the Armed Forces Special Powers Act from Srinagar, half a dozen policemen were killed.

    Similarly, the Union Government is yet to carry out the death sentence given by the Supreme Court to Afzal Guru even though he masterminded the 2001 Parliament attack. New Delhi’s excuse is that Guru’s mercy petition is under the President’s consideration. It has been there for the last seven years. The same is the position of Ajmal Kasab from Pakistan who too has been awarded the death sentence for his role in the Mumbai attacks of 2008. India has become the laughing stock of the world by deluding itself into believing that it is following the due process of law.

    India is still governed by laws that were formed in the British era — be it the Indian Penal Code or the Criminal Procedure Code. These have outlived their utility for the most part. Also, as a result of not strengthening the criminal justice system, there is unacceptable delay in deciding court cases. There are still some CBI cases pending for over 20 years. Pray, how can you expect a witness to be hiding behind a tree when, for instance, an encounter takes place between the security personnel and terrorists trying to cross the border into India in the middle of the night? Similarly, isn’t it too much to expect that a witness will also be present when Maoists and CRPF personnel are involved in a bloodbath in Chhattisgarh?

    Though the whole world knows about these criminals, terrorists still get away because of the obsolete laws and the Government’s total neglect of the judicial and criminal justice system. It is for this reason that nobody obeys even traffic rules. Unless we deal with the terrorists firmly at the entry point, the problem will continue.

    Jihadis are told — and they believe — that, once they are killed in the pursuit of their ‘duty’, they go straight to heaven where hoors (beautiful virgins) are waiting for them. However, the Government has failed to fulfil the expectations of these jihadis. It is time that their earnest desires are fulfilled by dispatching them to heaven at the earliest. Surely, this is not too much to expect even of this UPA Government!

    Make them pay for terror
     
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  3. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    JOGINDER SINGH has written the aforesaid, well he was ex CBI chief, he should know better that we have enough and toughest law in the world that is NSA Act, 1980 http://mha.nic.in/pdfs/National_Security_Act1980.pdf

    Person can be arrested even before he can commit any offence which is against the India, period can be technically indefinite if approved by Advisory board as sufficient reason, then authority can decided on the period of detention. We have to fight terror with these types of laws. Sadly police is not using this provision of law against terrorists.
     
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  4. maomao

    maomao Veteran Hunter of Maleecha Senior Member

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    His points are not against NSA. He is talking about the intent of the GOI, age old IPC and a non-existent anti-terror law!
     
  5. Bhadra

    Bhadra Defence Professionals Defence Professionals Senior Member

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    They only want votes !!
     
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