Major Production Milestone for U.S. Navy Air and Missile Defense Radar Program

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  1. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Raytheon Achieves Major Production Milestone for Air and Missile Defense Radar
    UNITED STATES - 19 MAY 2011

    TEWKSBURY, Mass. | Raytheon Company has produced the first group of S-band transmit/receive (T/R) modules for the U.S. Navy's Air & Missile Defense Radar program.

    The modules have been thoroughly tested and have proved to meet or exceed all AMDR performance and reliability requirements. This success marks a major milestone for the program, for which Raytheon is currently developing a technology demonstrator for the system's S-band radar and radar suite controller.

    "Our AMDR T/R modules are demonstrating significant capability and performance reliability," said Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems' (IDS) Kevin Peppe, vice president of Seapower Capability Systems. "Leveraging our established manufacturing expertise, experience and capacity, we will deliver a low-risk, high-performance system on schedule and on budget."

    This milestone advances Raytheon's progress for Phase II of the AMDR program and also demonstrates Raytheon's manufacturing readiness for AMDR Phase III, which calls for engineering and manufacturing development. Under Phase III, industry teams competing for the program will each be required to produce a functioning radar. Raytheon recently participated in a system requirements review with the Navy to report on its progress to date.

    Raytheon's skill and experience working with multiple radar bands, dating back to the Cobra Judy program and continuing today with the advanced Dual Band Radar and Cobra Judy Replacement programs, will ensure that AMDR's S- and X-band radars operate in coordination across a variety of operational environments. Additionally, Raytheon's extensive work with large-scale, active phased-array radars and expertise in ballistic missile defense radar technology position the company well for the AMDR competition. The company has a long heritage of developing and producing some of the world's most capable air and missile defense radars. Additionally, Raytheon has produced more than 1.8 million AESA (active electronically scanned array) T/R modules to date and has decades of experience working with adaptive beamforming technologies.

    AMDR will provide unprecedented capabilities for the Navy's Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. The radar suite will consist of an S-band radar, X-band radar and radar suite controller. The AMDR S-band component will provide volume search, tracking, ballistic missile defense discrimination and missile communications, while the X-band will perform horizon search, precision tracking, missile communication and terminal illumination functions. Also, AMDR will be scalable, enabling installation and integration on multiple platforms to meet the Navy's current and future mission requirements.


    AMDR allows naval forces to quickly respond to a broad spectrum of threats, both present and future.
    [​IMG]


    Source: Raytheon Company
     
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  3. Someoneforyou

    Someoneforyou Regular Member

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    Raytheon Conducts Key Customer Review for Air and Missile Defense Radar
    UNITED STATES - 7 JUNE 2011

    TEWKSBURY, Mass. | Raytheon Company conducted its system requirements review (SRR) for Phase II of the U.S. Navy's Air and Missile Defense Radar program. This review marks a major milestone for AMDR, for which Raytheon is currently developing a technology demonstrator for the system's S-band radar and radar suite controller.

    On May 17, Raytheon presented its progress to date on Phase II of the program to Navy representatives. During the SRR, the company demonstrated its understanding of AMDR's requirements and explained how Raytheon's mature design and architecture meets those requirements. The Raytheon team also displayed operational hardware from its AMDR pilot array, which is now undergoing integration and testing to ensure risk reduction for the program. Additionally, Raytheon presented its analysis of requirements, including cost and performance trade studies that showed how the system could be made less expensive without loss of important capability.

    The review established a clear path for Raytheon to advance to the system functional review, which will be held later this year. The Navy's feedback throughout the review was favorable, and Raytheon was commended for the advancements it has made to date on the program, having matured its design ahead of schedule, surpassing customer expectations.

    "The system requirements review was a major step forward for Raytheon and our entire AMDR team as we work to deliver a high-performance, low-cost solution to the Navy," said Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems' (IDS) Kevin Peppe, vice president of Seapower Capability Systems. "The strength of our industry team, combined with Raytheon's legacy of working with a broad range of scalable multifrequency radars, positions us well for this opportunity."

    AMDR provides unprecedented capabilities for the Navy's Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. It fills a critical gap in the joint forces' integrated air and missile defense capability, enabling highly effective missile defenses to be deployed in a flexible manner wherever needed. The radar suite consists of an S-band radar, X-band radar and radar suite controller. The system is scalable, enabling the radar to be sized according to mission need and to be installed on ships of varying size as necessary to meet the Navy's current and future mission requirements. The radar's digital beamforming capability enables it to perform multiple simultaneous missions, a critical feature that makes the system affordable and operationally effective for the Navy.



    Source: Raytheon Company
     

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