Laser/Beam weapons

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by LETHALFORCE, Jul 27, 2009.

  1. Bheeshma

    Bheeshma Regular Member

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    No a high speed missile cannot change its course willy nilly. It will experience massive G forces. Russians already had a solution keep the missile frame rotating so the heat is dissipated. Same reason why the Shaurya missile also rotates in flight. Laser system is very useful against aircrafts and sub-sonic cruise missiles. They cannot keep spinning. Laser and EMP systems are required for the future and will be in service in a decade or two. The time to do research on them is now not then.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
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  2. arnabmit

    arnabmit Homo Communis Indus Senior Member

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    Don't know which moron wants to bask in borrowed glory, uploaded this video!

    This is NOT KALI. This is LM ADAM.

    Here is the original video:

    [video=youtube_share;StC9nRB_AVY]http://youtu.be/StC9nRB_AVY[/video]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  3. CCP

    CCP Senior Member Senior Member

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    Some holes from 1998.

    BM at re entry stage and 155mm shell

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2014
  4. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  5. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  6. cobra commando

    cobra commando Tharki regiment Veteran Member Senior Member

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  7. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  8. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  9. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  10. cobra commando

    cobra commando Tharki regiment Veteran Member Senior Member

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  11. cobra commando

    cobra commando Tharki regiment Veteran Member Senior Member

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    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M., Feb. 17, 2015 – Boeing [NYSE: BA] has been awarded a $29.5 million contract to design and develop a beam control system that could provide exceptional accuracy for laser weapons on U.S. Navy warships. Boeing will begin to design a prototype High Power Beam Control Subsystem (HP BCSS) that’s compatible with High Energy Lasers (HEL) based on solid-state laser (SSL) technology. Boeing’s solution will be compatible with systems other companies are designing for the Office of Naval Research’s (ONR) Solid State Laser Technology Maturation (SSL-TM) program. The resulting beam control system will focus and hold a laser on a moving aimpoint long enough to disable the target. Doing that with a ship-based laser is particularly challenging, given the maritime environment and constant movement of an at-sea vessel. “Boeing innovations in beam control and directed energy technologies are keys to understanding laser weapon system configurations that could yield a capability for the Navy in their maritime environment,” said Peggy Morse, vice president, Boeing Directed Energy & Strategic Systems (DESS). The Boeing beam control system capitalizes on the company’s work with the U.S. Army’s High Energy Laser Mobile Demonstrator (HEL MD). In demonstrations at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida in 2014, in which Navy program team members participated, HEL MD acquired, tracked and destroyed targets in windy and foggy conditions. Important technical data was collected on energy systems within a maritime environment, which ONR shared with the Army and Boeing. HEL MD has disabled mortars and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) during recent testing.
    Boeing System Could Bring Precision to Laser Weapons on US Navy Ships
     
  12. cobra commando

    cobra commando Tharki regiment Veteran Member Senior Member

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  13. Victor3

    Victor3 Regular Member

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    But a missile can slow down and turn?
     
  14. Victor3

    Victor3 Regular Member

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    I think doesnt matter that the enemy has a EMP if you have long range missiles that intercept the plane that carry the EMP. Problem is that a EMP can be introduced in country via a spy. Also a EMP can be fired by a submarine that closes to your borders (and india has a poor navy) but this is another topic thing. And the problem is that ICBMs turn the war in a blitzkrieg anihilation.
     
  15. Victor3

    Victor3 Regular Member

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    Also a cooling liquid like helium could prevent laser for making damage
     
  16. Victor3

    Victor3 Regular Member

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    About cruise missiles: can a motor spin the body of the missile?
     
  17. Victor3

    Victor3 Regular Member

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    I have a question: when a laser is pointion first electron hit something affect the speed of all electrons in line?
     
  18. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  19. suny6611

    suny6611 Regular Member

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    no, the electrons r never in line.
    when a electron " hits" ... it hits another electron only.

    a laser is not a flow of electrons (electricity is a flow of electrons) but it is an amplified light ( a flow of photons)
     
  20. sorcerer

    sorcerer Senior Member Senior Member

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    General Atomics: Third-Gen Electric Laser Weapon Now Ready
    While fashions in high-energy lasers have changed as technology progresses, from gas to diode and now fiber, General Atomics Aeronautical Systems (GA-ASI) has stayed its course over more than a decade and believes its third generation of electric laser weapon is ready for prime time.

    The company has responded to an Office of Naval Research (ONR) solicitation for a 150-kw laser weapon suitable for installation on DDG-51-class destroyers to counter unmanned aircraft and small boats using only ship power and cooling.

    Under ONR’s Solid-State Laser Technology Maturation program, the weapon is to be demonstrated in 2018 on the USS Paul Foster, a decommissioned Spruance-class destroyer that now serves as the U.S. Navy’s ship-defense test vessel at Port Hueneme in California.

    GA-ASI has proposed its Gen 3 High-Energy Laser (HEL) system, which recently completed independent beam-quality and power testing for the U.S. government. The Gen 3 system is the third generation of electrically pumped laser using the architecture developed for Darpa’s Hellads program.
    [​IMG]
    General Atomics’ third-generation tactical laser weapon module is sized to be carried on its Avenger unmanned aircraft. Credit: Graham Warwick/AW&ST

    Under development since 2003, the 150-kw Hellads will be tested this summer at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. A smaller, lighter and more efficient Gen 2 system was built and tested in 2010-12 for the Pentagon’s HEL Joint Technology Office (JTO), says Jim Davis, director of laser weapons.

    Gen 3 has increased electrical-to-optical efficiency, improved beam quality and further reduced size and weight, says GA-ASI. A mockup of the Tactical Laser Weapon Module was displayed for the first time at the Sea-Air-Space show on April 13-15 in Washington.

    The module includes high-power-density lithium-ion batteries, liquid cooling for the laser and batteries, one or more laser unit cells and optics to clean up and stabilize the beam before it enters the platform-specific beam-director telescope, says Davis.

    The unit cell is a laser oscillator that produces a single 75-kw beam. Modules can be ganged together to produce a 150- or 300-kw beam. There is no beam-combining, Davis says, as there is in systems that use multiple lower-power fiber lasers.

    The Pentagon and several other manufacturers have shifted focus to fiber lasers because they are a commercial technology and have higher electrical-to-optical “wallplug” efficiency than diode lasers previously demonstrated at power levels exceeding 100 kw.
    [​IMG]
    Mockup shows one 75-kw laser unit cell (gold), although the tactical module has room for two, for a 150-kw laser weapon. Credit: Graham Warwick/AW&ST

    But the Gen 3’s efficiency is at the level of fiber lasers, Davis says, adding that the company has worked for several years to improve beam quality and achieved “excellent quality” in the latest tests. Adaptive optics adjust the beam to compensate for atmospheric distortion.

    In the independent unit-cell tests, beam quality was measured over a range of operating power and run time, which is limited only by the “magazine depth” of the battery system. “Beam quality was constant throughout the entire run of greater than 30 sec.,” says GA-ASI.

    “Fiber lasers are interesting, but it is a matter of maturity,” says Davis. “We are where fiber may be in five years. We have built several versions of this laser over the last 10 years, and we believe [the Gen 3 system] is affordable as is.”

    In addition to the ONR program, GA-ASI is eyeing the U.S. Army’s Boeing High Energy Laser Mobile Demonstrator (HEL MD). Live-fire tests of the HEL MD used a 10-kw industrial fiber laser and the Army intends to upgrade the system to a 60-kw Lockheed Martin fiber laser.

    The next step is a 120-kw laser, planned for testing in the early 2020s, and for which GA-ASI plans to propose the Gen 3 system. The Air Force Research Laboratory, meanwhile, is interested in a podded laser weapon, although there is no formal program yet.

    Davis says the Gen 3’s size enables an airborne laser module in the 150-kw range to be carried by GA-ASI’s Avenger unmanned aircraft. The UAV has sufficient onboard power to recharge the module’s batteries in flight. “That’s the utility; you don’t need to go back to reload,” Davis says.

    General Atomics: Third-Gen Electric Laser Weapon Now Ready | Technology content from Aviation Week
     

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