Krishna's veiled warning to Nepal

Discussion in 'Foreign Relations' started by ejazr, Apr 22, 2011.

  1. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    4,518
    Likes Received:
    1,378
    Location:
    Hyderabad and Sydney
    http://www.telegraphindia.com/1110422/jsp/nation/story_13887027.jsp

    New Delhi, April 21: Foreign minister S.M. Krishna today asked Nepal’s leaders to stop Maoist attacks on Indian investors as he sent out a veiled warning that private-sector investments from across the border could dry up if the “harassment” continued.

    “I conveyed to the leadership of Nepal that Nepal must develop an environment of trust and confidence to attract investment from India and conveyed that Indian investors, who provided capital and employment opportunities in Nepal, should be given due protection,” the minister, on a three-day official visit to the Himalayan country, said in Kathmandu.

    The oblique warning came days after Maoist cadres stormed a meeting of Indian infrastructure company GMR and threw stones at Delhi’s envoy Rakesh Sood at an event attended by the diplomat earlier this month.

    Krishna yesterday held meetings with President Ram Baran Yadav and Prime Minister Jhala Nath Khanal. Krishna, foreign secretary Nirupama Rao, ambassador Sood and other officials also held delegation-level talks with a Nepalese side led by deputy Prime Minister Bharat Mohan Adhikari.

    After taking over as Prime Minister in February, Khanal has tried to iron out the rough spots in Kathmandu’s relations with Delhi. But he has so far not been able to rein in the Maoists, who have ratcheted up their anti-India propaganda and activities.

    The Unified Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist), led by Pushpa Kamal Dahal “Prachanda”, is the dominant partner in the ruling coalition.

    Indian officials said Delhi was willing to step up investments in Nepal in various sectors, including hydel power, if the security concerns of Indian companies were addressed. GMR is working on a hydel power project.

    Krishna reminded the Nepalese leadership that India was “the largest investor in Nepal”. He said Indian companies were eager to do more to promote the neighbour’s industrial manufacturing capabilities but cited instances of “harassment being meted out to some of the larger Indian joint ventures”.

    Nearly 400 Indian joint ventures are registered in Nepal, with a total investment of US$ 811 million. Indian officials said the investments had created direct job opportunities for over 50,000 Nepalis.

    Krishna said he conveyed Delhi’s “serious concern on the attacks on our ambassador” and requested the Nepal government to provide adequate security to Indian diplomats. He also requested deputy Prime Minister Adhikari to resolve a tax row involving Indian telecom company UTL.

    The Nepalese leadership assured the Indian delegation its concerns would be addressed and also said the dispute with UTL would be amicably resolved.

    The Nepalese leaders briefed Krishna about “internal developments” and the “progress being made towards completing the peace process and drafting of the new Constitution”. The 2006 peace process, which needs to be concluded by May 28, is perceived to be stumbling as Nepal’s political parties have so far failed to build a consensus on contentious issues like integration of Maoist cadres in the army.

    But Krishna said he had been “assured” by the Nepalese leadership that they “recognised the crucial importance of preserving the professional integrity and apolitical nature” of the army.

    The minister also raised issues of terrorism and smuggling of fake Indian currency from Nepal and the need to formalise boundary maps. He also asked for early formalisation of the revised extradition treaty and the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty that have been pending for the past five years.
    ------------------------------

    Arguably after Pakistan, the biggest country that is giving GoI a headache is Nepal and there doesn't seem to be any signs of improving relations in the short term. Keep in mind that we have an open border with Nepal and most of the cases of recent arms smuggling, fake curency rackets e.t.c. have mostly come through the open border with Nepal.
     
  2.  
  3. ganesh177

    ganesh177 Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2009
    Messages:
    863
    Likes Received:
    295
    Location:
    Pune, Incredible India
    By the way, what use is open borders for india, except from tourism angle ?
    Tourist can anyways visit nepal even if its closed borders, then why not close it if it can minimise our headache a bit.
     
  4. debasree

    debasree Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    811
    Likes Received:
    82
    Location:
    Calcutta, India, India
    stop the transit facility they r useing like kolkata port which is one of the lifeline of nepals economy
     
  5. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
    Messages:
    27,593
    Likes Received:
    28,399
    Location:
    BHARAT, INDIA, HINDUSTHAN
    Common Nepalis are not enemy nor the democratic Gov, We should never punish Nepal economic, It will eventually effects its people which are mostly and mostly PRO Indian, Our Real Enemy are CHICOMs which are indirectly backing Moist in Nepal and brain washing simple farmers..
     
  6. amitkriit

    amitkriit Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2009
    Messages:
    2,465
    Likes Received:
    1,923
    Location:
    La La Land
    Such problems exist in every big-power small-power equation. Nepal's Maoists are using India as bogeyman.
     
  7. nrj

    nrj Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2009
    Messages:
    9,252
    Likes Received:
    3,347
    Location:
    Brussels
    Not many positives for India in Krishna’s Nepal visit

    External Affairs Minister SM Krishna’s three-day visit to Nepal that ended on Friday would be remembered as a courtesy call that didn’t have many positives for New Delhi. Just before leaving Krishna told media persons that the visit was “useful”, but most of India’s crucial concerns were not a
    ddressed during the trip and are unlikely to see fruition in the near future.

    The Indian delegation that included foreign secretary Nirupama Rao highlighted key concerns like security, attacks on Indian envoy by Maoists and threats faced by Indian companies.

    But formalization of the revised extradition treaty and the mutual legal assistance treaty that have been pending for over six years made no progress except routine assurances from Nepal.

    Formalization of the boundary strip maps (covering nearly 98% of the boundary between both nations) that would create better frame of reference for boundary management also made no headway.

    Same was the case with formalization of the bilateral investment protection and promotion agreement and the double taxation avoidance agreement—both necessary to build investor confidence.

    “It is necessary for Nepal to realize that favourable climate is needed to build confidence of investors not just from India but from other countries as well,” said Krishna.

    These issues are likely to remain pending for some more time as the two-and-half month old Jhalanath Khanal government is facing opposition from all sides and its future is uncertain.

    Krishna had a “free and productive” exchange of ideas with Maoist chief Pushpa Kamal Dahal ‘Prachand’ and urged him to refrain from indulging in anti-India activities.

    As expected, the EAM offered India’s “supportive psychological role” in early conclusion of the peace process and constitution drafting---both of which have to be completed before May 28.

    When asked to point out the single most significant achievement of his visit, Krishna said it was the ability to meet many leaders from across the political spectrum within a short period.

    Hindustan Times
     
  8. sesha_maruthi27

    sesha_maruthi27 Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    3,884
    Likes Received:
    1,568
    Location:
    Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh(INDIA)
    Well we have to stop those communisits who are taking their command from the chinese and are working to spoil the relations with India. They are the cuprits who even spoiled the ROYAL FAMILY of Nepal. But if at all a war like situation arises, India can get control over Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh. This is a known fact.
     
  9. arya

    arya Senior Member Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2009
    Messages:
    2,312
    Likes Received:
    340
    well nepal ,sl,bd ,bhutan must be i mean must be our close friend
     
  10. Yusuf

    Yusuf GUARDIAN Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2009
    Messages:
    24,274
    Likes Received:
    11,283
    Location:
    BANGalore
    And along with that invite a huge problem for india. We don't need to take control of these nations for whatever reason.
     
  11. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    4,518
    Likes Received:
    1,378
    Location:
    Hyderabad and Sydney
    India concerned over anti-India activities in Nepal

    KATHMANDU, April 22: India has expressed concerns over anti-Indian activities in Nepal, including smuggling of fake Indian currency, and urged the government to check such activities.

    “We are concerned about smuggling of fake Indian currency notes to India through Nepal,” said Indian External Affairs Minister SM Krishna at the end of his three-day visit to Nepal. “I conveyed to the Nepali leadership that terrorism is a common threat to India and Nepal and our security concerns are interlinked because of an open border.


    Krishna, who arrived here on Wednesday for a three-day visit, returned New Delhi on Friday after meeting government leadership and top leaders of various political parties. India´s security concerns had featured in all the meetings.

    “I also stressed the importance of the early formalization of the revised Extradition Treaty and the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty that have been pending for over six years as these would enable better coordination and cooperation between the security agencies of the two countries,” Krishna told a press conference at the Tribhuvan International Airport.

    Earlier on Friday morning, Krishna met Maoist Chairman Pushpa Kamal Dahal to register India´s displeasure over anti-Indian activities of the former rebel parties and over attacks on Indian Ambassador Rakesh Sood. He had expressed similar concerns with the government as well.

    “I conveyed our serious concern on the attacks on our Ambassador, which is completely contrary to the rich tradition of hospitability that Nepal is known for and requested the government of Nepal to provide adequate safety to Indian diplomats and diplomatic premises in Nepal,” Krishna said.

    Krishna said that constitution writing and peace process should be completed by May 28. He stressed on the need for keeping the Nepal Army apolitical.

    Security of Indian investment in Nepal was also one of Krishna´s concerns. He urged Nepal to formalize the Bilateral Investment Protection and Promotion of Agreement (BIPPA) and the Double Taxation Avoidance Agreement.

    Earlier in the afternoon, he laid the foundation stone of the Tarai Road Project and integrated check posts in Birgunj.
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2011
  12. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    Messages:
    4,518
    Likes Received:
    1,378
    Location:
    Hyderabad and Sydney
    India raises security concerns with Nepal
    AFP

    KATHMANDU — India's foreign minister on Friday urged Nepal to provide better protection to Indian diplomats as he wound up a three-day visit to the Himalayan nation.

    India's ambassador, Rakesh Sood, has faced several protests in the past year with Maoist party members hurling shoes at him while he toured Indian-funded assistance projects outside the capital Kathmandu.

    Throwing shoes is considered a mark of disrespect in Hindu culture.

    "I conveyed our serious concern about the attacks on our ambassador, which is completely contrary to Nepal's tradition of hospitality," Indian Foreign Minister S.M. Krishna told reporters.

    He added that he had "requested the government (of Nepal) to provide adequate safety to Indian diplomats and diplomatic premises."

    Concerns about the safety of foreign diplomats was heightened after a Pakistani embassy official suffered multiple wounds when he was shot by an unidentified gunman last week in Kathmandu.

    The Maoists form part of Nepal's government and are a major force in the country. They have traditionally resented the Indians, viewing them as interfering in the country's internal affairs.

    But India provides a vital lifeline to its landlocked neighbour as its sole supplier of fuel and the two mainly Hindu countries share close religious and cultural links.

    They also share an open frontier, allowing citizens of each nation to travel freely across each other's borders.
     

Share This Page