Kerala’s riches & rapes: One of India’s most progressive state

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by parijataka, Jun 19, 2013.

  1. parijataka

    parijataka Senior Member Senior Member

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    Some might say Kerala is recording crime data efficiently but I kind of agree with the author here. Violence and Marx go hand in hand - as seen in Tripura and West Bengal. And the literacy and health care stats are due to earlier enlightened rulers, Missionaries and private efforts not due to socialism as the author (Swaminathan aiyar) proves with data.

    Kerala’s riches & rapes: One of India’s most progressive state, but crime data is shockingly bad

    Kerala is supposed to be a socialist paradise with the best social and gender indicators, frowning on economic growth and globalisation. But a look at the latest crime data suggests that even Kerala's image as a civilised paradise for women is much exaggerated.

    Of all states, Kerala has the highest crime rate of 455.8 per lakh people, over twice the national rate of 196.7 (see table). India's crime capital is Kochi (817.9) followed by Kollam (637.3).

    Now, crimes are underreported in India, especially in the north. So, Kerala's high crime figures represent, in part, proper recording of crimes. Even so, the figures look uncomfortably high.

    Crimes Against Women

    Kerala has the highest female-male ratio (1084:1000 against the national 940:1000) and the highest female literacy rate (92%). This is attributed to a historical lead in education, matrilineality and enlightened gender attitudes.

    Yet crimes against women in Kerala are shockingly high. The rape rate in Kerala (2.9) is almost one and a half times the national rate (2.1). The rate of assault on women with intent to outrage their modesty is 10.7 in Kerala, thrice as high as the national average (3.7). The rate of insults related to the modesty of women is 1.4, against the national 0.8.

    Kerala does far better than India overall in dowry deaths: its rate 0.1 against the national 0.7. Yet cruelty to women comes in at the rate of 15 per lakh population, almost double the national 8.8.

    The highest rates for cruelty are in two other Marxist strongholds — Tripura (23.4) and Bengal (21.9). Can this be attributed entirely to Marxist transparency in reporting? Nobody will believe the very low rate of 3.7 in Uttar Pradesh and Bihar, who are clearly guilty of gross under-reporting.

    [​IMG]

    Kerala has a relatively low rate of murder and theft, but its cheating rate is almost double the national average. It is the champion in criminal rioting (31.4 against the national 6.2). This may explain the state's extraordinarily high rate of criminal hurt (60.7 against the national 27.7) and arson (1.6 against 1.0). We need more research on these subjects.

    Crime data are an additional reason to rethink the famed Kerala model of socialist development. For decades, Amartya Sen and Mahbub ul Haq (creator of the Human Development Index) lavished praise on Kerala for achieving high social indicators through government intervention while being poor and growing slowly. New research shows this to be substantially illusory.

    Rethinking the Model

    Despite land reform and Marxist pretensions, the state is virtually the most unequal in India (with a Gini coefficient of 0.392 against the national 0.336). True, it has the highest Human Development Index, life expectancy and literacy, and the lowest fertility and infant mortality rate. But these have not arisen by emphasising welfare over GDP or economic growth.

    Kerala has been among the richest five states (measured by per capita income) since 1980-81. It has the highest per capita spend in rural and urban areas. It is among the fastest-growing states, with a peak growth rate of 10.4% in 2007-08. This owes a lot to rising remittances from overseas Keralites, which now account for 32% of state GDP. So, Kerala's high social indicators are correlated not with poverty or lack of economic growth, but with rising Mammonisation.

    Markets, Not Marx

    Its leaders mouth anti-globalisation slogans, yet its economy represents a triumph of globalisation through remittances and exports of agricultural goods. Land reform may have helped, yet Kerala's rice yields are lower than in neighbouring Tamil Nadu. Kerala is very lucky in its agroclimate: it is the only state that gets copious rains from both the South West and North East monsoons.

    This enables it to specialise in plantation crops — coconuts, arecanuts, cashew, rubber, tea coffee, spices — yielding up to 10 times the income per acre as rice.

    Kerala has since Roman times been among India's most globalised states, exporting spices and other farm products. Its high Muslim population is explained by the influence of trade with the Gulf, not Islamic conquest (as in North India).

    Kerala's early lead in education began under enlightened maharajas in the 1800s, supplemented by Christian missionaries and Nair and Ezhava movements. Kerala has the highest proportion of students in private rural schools (53%). Its educational success is based on private, not state provision (though the state finances private schools).

    In health, Kerala has the highest private spending. In 2004-05, private health spending in Kerala wasRs 2,663 per capita, more than double that of its nearest rival Punjab (Rs 1,112).

    By contrast, public health spending per capita in Kerala was just Rs 280. In sum, Kerala is not a success of welfare socialism. Rather, it is a success of globalisation, private provision of education and health, and rapid economic growth — along with the associated high inequality. And high crime.
     
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  3. parijataka

    parijataka Senior Member Senior Member

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    Kerala also has one of the highest unemployment rates in India with militant trade unions not allowing industry to grow. Read last paragraph of where most Keralites find employment in the state.

    Unemployment level in State 9.9 percent

    As per the Economic Review report 2012, Kerala is in fourth position in unemployment level among states, with an unemployment level of 9.9 per cent. The three other states ahead of Kerala in unemployment levels are small states, namely Goa(17.9 percent), Tripura (14.1 percent) and Sikkim (12.6 percent). However, if the unemployment levels are taken according to the current daily status (CDS) approach, Kerala is in the second position with 14.3 per cent behind Tripura (17.2 per cent). The report indicates that among the larger Indian states, the unemployment level in the state is the highest in India.

    According to the live register of the employment exchanges in the state, there are 45 lakh unemployed persons, of which 27.4 lakh are women.

    With regard to inter-state migrant labourers in the state, Palakkad district accounted for the largest number while Idukki had the least number. The unemployment among educated youths is the major issue facing the state. The unemployment level is higher in urban areas compared to the rural areas under all approaches of measurement. Unemployment is found to be much higher among women compared to men. While the unemployment levels among women was 26.2 per cent it was 23.4 per cent among men. In urban areas, the women unemployment rate is 37.5 per cent whereas in rural areas it was 21.4 per cent. The survey points out that as the living cost is high in the state, youths prefer to go abroad seeking high remuneration. Some important indicators on employment/ unemployment level in Kerala as per the survey conducted by the National Sample Survey Organisation in 2004-05 and 2009-10 shows that unemployment level had come down during the 2004-09 period. The unemployment rate under CDS approach during this period in rural areas was 21.1 percent in 2004-05. This rate fell to 12.9 per cent as per 2009-10 sample survey. In urban areas, the unemployment rate had declined from 17.4 per cent to 12.1 per cent. A major finding in the Economic Review is that employment in the organised sector had declined.

    In 2000, 12.26 lakh persons were employed in the organised sector. But in 2005, the number of employed in this sector had come down to 11.4 lakh and further to 10.89 lakh in 2012, a reduction of 11.2 per cent over a period of 12 years.

    The share of women in organised sector employment as on March, 2012, was 41.2 per cent. In the organised sector employment, a substantial chunk was in public sector units.

    In 2012, out of the 10.89 lakh employed in the organised sector, 5.77 lakh (53 per cent) were in the public sector and 5.12 lakh (47 per cent)in the private sector.

    The share of women in public sector employment in Kerala is 32.1 per cent whereas in the case of private sector it is 51.6 per cent.

    The branchwise analysis in the public sector shows that persons employed in the Central government offices in Kerala is on the decline over the years. At the end of March 2000, there were 86,889 employees in the Central Government offices here. The number dropped to 76,789 in 2005 and further to 60,078 in 2012.

    The percent of distribution of employment in the public sector as on March 31, 2012, shows that 47 per cent of employment is in state government and the employment in Central Government sector is just 10 per cent. The share of the quasi-governments, Central and state together is 39 per cent of public sector employment.
     
  4. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    kerala is ----ed up
     
    Das ka das likes this.
  5. TrueSpirit

    TrueSpirit Senior Member Senior Member

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    That's a fact. A multitude of factors working in tandem, powerful trade unions, ethnic tensions aided by Petro-dollars & Wahabi indoctrination of Gulf-returned chaps, new-found urge to make quick money, breaking families & inexorable nuclearization of the ultimate support system, i.e. "family", have taken a toll on this state. Despite the latent potential & some statistics , it hardly reflects the Modern India, one would prefer to see. Arguably, it is also considered as "suicide state", a term coined to reflect its disproportionate number of suicides w.r.t population & its is way higher than national average.

    From a outsider perspective, I would say Karnataka & Tamil Nadu have done relatively better than Kerala, in these respects.
     
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    They are industrious and so the riches and they are oversexed and so the rapes!

    Even the pious Catholic padres are hard at it, if the media is to be believed!

    Avoid Malayalee food if you don't want to be behind bars!
     

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