Kashmir Unrest - International Dimension

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by ejazr, Sep 16, 2010.

  1. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    After almost four months of unrest and no solid response from the Centre to tackle the violence and not only to tackle the media coverage as well, the international aspect has to be taken into account.
    True that many of the official capitals other than PAkistan have not voiced their opinions on that matter but if the deaths at the level seen in the past few days continues it will be problematic.

    What must be realised is that many countries WANT to see India in a good light. They WANT to see India as country of idealistic equality and peaceful co-existence. The good will will not last for long and they want the dispute to be resolved. This editorial from a Saudi Paper I think puts that sentiment into perspective.


    Editorial: Kashmir unrest - Arab News

    The deep-flowing river of discontent in the state has to be addressed politically

    The deteriorating situation in Kashmir is cause for the greatest concern, not just for Indians and Pakistanis.The status of Kashmir and the situation that Kashmiris find themselves in are issues that Muslims feel strongly about. The knowledge that Kashmiris are being killed — at least 80 in the past three months and 18 on Monday alone — could well fuel anti-Indian sentiment in a number of countries. That has to be avoided.

    India, like Pakistan, is a much-valued and much admired friend of Saudi Arabia. No one wants to see it damaged in any way. But it is painfully apparent that the Kashmir issue is not being handled wisely: Monday’s killing of civilians by the Indian police is hardly going to calm the situation. It can only inflame tempers.

    Plans by a maverick Florida church to burn the Holy Qur’an has added a new dimension to the protests going on in Kashmir since June. As Arab News said in this column last week, there was a serious possibility that people would die because of those plans. Tragically that has proved the case despite the fact that the desecration did not occur.

    However, to see the Monday’s protest and subsequent ones as purely about a far-away desecration of the Qur’an is a serious mistake. For Kashmiris, faith is indissolubly woven into their identity, an identity that for many also includes the sense of not being free and being oppressed by Indian rule. The protests have been about both — about at attack on Islam and resentment at Indian rule.

    Regardless of what some people think, Kashmir is not Palestine. It is not a country that has been stolen, its people forced into exile, their lands seized and colonized. It is more comparable with Northern Ireland or the Basque country where a significant percentage of the population does not feel to be part of the state they find themselves in.

    India still has not come to terms with that reality. It is not simply a case of militants based in Pakistan stirring things up. That is why military repression in Kashmir cannot work. It is not a case of a miniscule minority demanding change at odds with a majority that accepts the status quo. There is a deep-flowing river of discontent in the state that has to be addressed politically. A solution acceptable to both India and Pakistan would help but it has to be acceptable first to the people of Kashmir. Northern Ireland shows that political solutions can happen, although it took the British a long time to reach that point. In Northern Ireland’s case, festering minority community alienation from the political establishment was transformed into years of violence and terrorism, the trigger being the killing of 26 demonstrators by the British Army in 1972, known as Bloody Sunday.

    There is alienation in Kashmir, from Indian rule but even more from the Abdullah dynasty that New Delhi has allowed to become entrenched as the political establishment there. While that establishment remains and while New Delhi continues to believe that violence can be contained by force that to many seems counterviolence, Kashmir will be a powder keg. At the end of the day, just as the British had to do a deal in Northern Ireland with those they considered terrorists, just as the French had to do it in Algeria, just as the Americans will have to do it in Afghanistan, so New Delhi will have to in Kashmir.
     
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  3. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    3 day Kashmir event starts at the European Parliament

    Brussels: A three day event highlighting effects of the Kashmir conflict started at the European Parliament in Brussels today. 'Beauty of Kashmir, preserved past and bruised present' is organized by the (ICHD) Kashmir Council EU and supported by IKV and the World Kashmir Diaspora Alliance.
    The event was timed for the beginning of the parliaments calendar session, reminding the EU to focus on eliminating the human rights abuses which have increased recently. The event also urged the EU to assist in finding a peaceful Kashmir solution.
    At the inauguration MEP Sajjad Karim, the host of the event, affirmed that the European Parliament remains engaged in assisting the region to overcome the conflict and current unrest.
    Glenis Zillmott, MEP and Head of the 'Labour Party Group' gave words of encouragement highlighting the current situation in Kashmir.
    Chairman of Kashmir Council EU and ICHD Ali Raza Syed, stated that the continued Indian repression in Kashmir has bruised Kashmiri culture and its physical and spiritual landscape while destroying hundreds of thousands of families. He appealed to the European Union to use its influence to stop murder and repression in Jammu and Kashmir. For a peaceful resolution, he reiterated, the people of Kashmir must be allowed to exercise their right of self determination.
    Marjan Lucas of IKV Pax Christi, introduced a photographic exhibition which reflected Kashmir’s beauty that has been bruised.
    Farooq Siddiqi of World Kashmir Diaspora Alliance reminded the international community and the European Union to intervene in Kashmir and to administer the United Nations pledge for a resolution. He challenged the notion of India’s democracy in Kashmir, adding that it is in India’s interest to respect the will of the people of Kashmir.
    Indian author Dr Seema Kazi gave horrifying details of atrocities on Kashmiri women and read excerpts from her book. Danielle Caron, a Belgian MP also spoke at the event. Dignitaries and representatives from several international organizations including Human Rights Watch as well as parliamentarians; Csaba Sogor and Pirre Migacha attended. The next two days programs will show the documentaries about Kashmir highlighting the human sufferings.
     
  4. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    our propoganda sucks....we should take lessons from israel or outsource it to them :)
     
  5. ejazr

    ejazr Stars and Ambassadors Stars and Ambassadors

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    I think the perrception or fact that media is being prevented from coverage is harmful and unnecessary. This doesnt' mean just give an open hand for rumour mongering.

    I am thinking of more like having embeded journalists or even foreign journalists embeded with the Army or local police in select locations. Give them coverage of Ladakh and Jammu areas as well as peaceful areas within the valley. Then force the question on them to ask the Pakistani government if they can be allowed to cover Gilgit Baltistan or other parts of Kashmir on Pakistani side like that.

    The media management is really pathetic and this is a historical problem. Recall that the Kargil War coverage was also a similar problem which was also highlighted by army personnel as such/.
    ‘Barring foreign media in Kargil cost India dear’
     
  6. ajtr

    ajtr Veteran Member Veteran Member

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    Chasing a consensus


    The all-party meeting convened by the prime minister and the chairperson of the UPA on September 15 reached a consensus to send an all-party delegation to Kashmir to interact with all Kashmiri parties, including the separatists, and report back to the prime minister to enable the government to adopt various measures which would at least partially satisfy the agitators in Kashmir and initiate a dialogue under peaceful conditions. The prime minister referred to the fact that while some violence in Kashmir was spontaneous, some was orchestrated. The UPA chairperson stressed the need to understand the causes for the anger of the youth in Kashmir and called for magnanimity. It appeared that most of the participants, not all, proceeded on the basis that the agitators in Kashmir had genuine grievances and they will be amenable to discussion and a rational solution of those grievances. On the other hand, Syed Ali Shah Geelani, the separatist leader, had already asserted that he did not expect any positive result from the all-party meet. The demand that unconditional dialogue should be initiated by the government with all Kashmiri leaders, including the separatists, has been reiterated and there was no emphasis on a specific grievance redressal. The PM emphasised the need for restoration of peace as a necessary condition to dialogue and for grievance redressal.

    If the agitation in Kashmiri towns is about redressable grievances and the agitators are interested in dialogue and having their grievances addressed, then there should be peace in the next few days in Kashmir to enable the authorities to restore normalcy and allow the all-party delegation to move about freely and meet all Kashmiri leaders including the separatists. There is an alternative hypothesis referred to by the PM, that at least part of the violence was deliberately orchestrated. Underlying that hypothesis is the assessment that there are elements in Kashmir who are opposed to any grievance redressal or dialogue and are more interested in converting the Kashmir situation into an intifada to coincide with the opening of the UN general assembly session run-up to the Obama visit. If that hypothesis is correct then there may be no reduction in violence to facilitate the all-party delegation’s visit to Srinagar or meetings with the separatist leaders. One should instead expect non-cooperation from the separatist leaders and resurgence of violence. The issue will be tested from today and we may not have to wait long for an answer.

    There are demands for unconditional dialogue with all Kashmiri parties and the prime minister agrees that there is no alternative to dialogue. But there are no commitments that the deliberate, provocative violence will stop. Analyses of riots all over the world reveal that a trigger group of 15 to 20 persons can instigate a mob to violence. Such large-scale police casualties indicate pre-planned provocations. One report mentions that more than 1600 policemen have been injured in the “non-violent” protests in Kashmir. A careful assessment is needed on whether the trading community in Srinagar and other towns would submit to continuous curfews, but for external threats to them to not come in the way of the provocative, high intensity stone-throwing planned as sustained campaigns.

    Not much thought appears to have been given to the structure and process of Kashmir-Delhi political dialogue. In Kashmir, there are a large number of national and regional parties functioning within the framework of the Indian Constitution and are represented in the legislature and in Parliament. There are also separatist groups who have boycotted elections and whose popular support is not determinable but who are vociferous in their demands and are behind the agitations. The elected Kashmiri parties want the separatists to be included in the unconditional dialogue. In Delhi too there is no consensus on how the Kashmir problem should be addressed and on various component issues, such as the Armed Forces Special Powers Act or the degree of autonomy to be extended. It is obvious a Srinagar-Delhi unconditional political dialogue assembling all the stakeholders on both sides may only result in each party or group restating its known position and posturing for its constituency. Such an unstructured dialogue would not produce any result for eons to come.

    The recently released Ipsos MORI poll conducted by the London School of Economics showed that while in the Valley separatist sentiment may be relatively stronger, in the whole state of J&K the majority want to stay with India. In regions other than the Valley opposition to separatism is very strong. In such circumstances a rational approach to a political dialogue will be for all parties in the state, non-separatists and separatists, to evolve a consensus among themselves and present it to Delhi, where it could be discussed at a national all-party meeting to evolve a consensus decision. Within non-separatist and separatist parties and groups in the state there is at present no consensus and internal differences are deep, some based on personality clashes.

    Delhi will not be able to arrive at any peaceful solution to the issue by negotiating directly with a whole host of Kashmiri parties, constitutionalists and separatists. Any concession to one or the other set of parties will be sabotaged by those left out. Nor can Delhi afford to overlook the possibility of Pakistan’s ISI initiating and sustaining violence. It looks as though the Kashmiri parties and the separatists are attempting to use Delhi to cover up their own “crypto civil war”. Kashmiri crowds are indulging in intense violence to provoke the Kashmiri policemen under an elected Kashmiri administration. The Indian army and paramilitary forces (the CRPF is a police force at the disposal of the Kashmir police) are not involved in the present violence. Delhi should not get itself trapped in the “crypto Kashmiri civil war”.

    The writer is a senior defence analyst
     
  7. neo29

    neo29 Senior Member Senior Member

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    Its time the Indian Government take action against Hurriyat for anti national activities. They clearly and openly do it and the rules say take action. Why aint the Government not doing it??? Why cant they use the army to arrest the protestors and stone pelters who are dancing to the tunes of Hurriyat??? These people are not the representative of people of Kashmir.

    Their representative the Maharaja made is decision and we are upholding it. Now every nut comes forth and says we want this and that since we represent the people of Kashmir and this foolish government even talks to them.
     

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