Kachin dha , Ancient Burmese Sword - My Family Heirloom

Discussion in 'Military History' started by Iamanidiot, Jan 22, 2012.

  1. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    This sword is supposed to be a Burmese Kachin dha about 200-150 years old
    katana 009 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

    My paternal grandfather gave this to me recently from his armoury
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 22, 2012
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  3. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    This is the Katana or the Japanese Samurai sword.

    [​IMG]

    Could be a WWII souvenir which you have been presented because what you have appended at Flicker, it appears the same?
     
  4. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    No sir it is not a katana this is a kachin dha a burmese sword and this particular sword has been extensively used between 1850-1947 my great grandpa is supposed to have lopped some people when my family used to do monkey business in Burma.This sword has seen action even during WW-2 after that the whole stash of swords have become souvenirs and the blade is still sharp it hasn't been sharpened in 60 years
     
  5. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Kachin originated from China, and is called Jingpo mostly in Yunnan Prov.. Every male adult is supposed with a sword. Do u see similarities with below pics?

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    Ohimalaya cannot see the pics u posted.The sword is made in Burma that is for sure or in Burma made by some Chinese blacksmiths .My family did lot of commerce with South-east Asia and we even smuggled some Chinese families out of SE-Asia during WW-2
     
  7. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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  8. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Katana Swords

    [​IMG]

    ]http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-kaQczz4QZCU/TgKevj2pHEI/AAAAAAAAAXU/MlxAGZwFLE4/s1600/o_JAPANESE-OFFICER-KATANA-SWORD-105215.jpg

    The katana (刀?) is one of the traditional Japanese swords (日本刀 nihonto?) worn by the samurai class of feudal Japan, also commonly referred to as a "samurai sword".[1]

    The katana is generally defined as the standard size moderately curved (as opposed to the older "tachi" style featuring more curvature) Japanese sword with a blade length greater than 60 cm (23.6 inches).[3]

    With a few exceptions katana and tachi can be distinguished from each other if signed, by the location of the signature (mei) on the tang (nakago). In general the mei should be carved into the side of the nakago that would face outward when the sword was worn. Since a tachi was worn cutting edge down and the katana was worn cutting edge up, the mei would be in opposite locations on the nakago of both types of swords.[4]

    The katana is characterized by its distinctive appearance: a curved, slender, single edged blade, circular or squared guard, and long grip to accommodate two hands.[3] It has historically been associated with the samurai of feudal Japan, and has become renowned for its sharpness and cutting ability.

    In the strictest sense the term katana in Japanese is applied to any kind of single-edged sword, of any origin, and does not necessarily refer to a Japanese sword.

    "Katana" was originally used as a general term for a single-edged sword having a "sori" or curvature of the blade. While the "sugata" or form can take many shapes, including double edged, the term is now used incorrectly to describe nihontō that are 2 shaku (606 mm / 24 in) and longer, also known as "dai" or "daito" among Western sword enthusiasts although daito is actually a generic name for any long sword.[5]

    This distinguishes them from the straight-bladed chokutō, which was brought from China by way of Korea.[6] The chokutō is speculated to have been the first "sugata" type the katana took on, being modeled after the imported swords. This emergence of the first nihontō took place the same time period as the beginning of Japanese feudalism and recognition of the daimyo or "great family" in the late ninth century.[6]

    Pronounced [katana], the kun'yomi (Japanese reading) of the kanji 刀, originally meaning dao (sword) or knife/saber in Chinese, the word has been adopted as a loanword by the Portuguese language.[7] In Portuguese the designation (spelled catana) means "large knife" or machete.[7] As Japanese does not have separate plural and singular forms, both "katanas" and "katana" are considered acceptable forms in English.[8]

    Meibutsu (noted swords) is a special designation given to sword masterpieces which are listed in a compilation from the 1700s called the "Kyoho Meibutsucho". The swords listed are Koto blades from several different provinces, 100 of the 166 swords listed are known to exist today with Soshu blades being very well represented. The "Kyoho Meibutsucho" also listed the nicknames, prices, history and length of the Meibutsy with swords by Yoshimitsu, Masamune, Yoshihiro, and Sadamune being very highly priced.[9]

    History

    The katana evolved as a more sleek and compact alternative to the tachi. Its origins go at least as far back as the Kamakura Period, with several blades dated from that time residing in various national repositories.

    Its growth in popularity is believed to have been due to the changing nature of close-combat warfare. The quicker draw of the sword was well suited to combat where victory depended heavily on fast response times. The katana further facilitated this by being worn thrust through a belt-like sash (obi) with the bladed edge facing upwards. Ideally, samurai could draw the sword and strike down the enemy in a single motion.[6] Previously, the curved tachi had been worn with the edge of the blade facing down and suspended from a belt.[3][6]

    The length of the blade varied considerably during the course of its history. In the late 14th and early 15th centuries, katana blades tended to be between 70 to 73 cm (27.6 to 28.7 in) in length. While during the early 16th century, the average length was closer to 60 cm (23.6 in). By the late 16th century, the average length returned to approximately 73 cm (28.7 in).

    The katana was often paired with a similar smaller companion sword, such as a wakizashi or it could also be worn with the tantō, an even smaller similarly shaped sword. The pairing of a katana with a smaller sword is called the daishō. The daisho could only be worn by samurai and it represented the social power and personal honor of the samurai.[3][6][10]

    More at including pictures at

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katana
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2012
  9. Oracle

    Oracle New Member

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    You have the perfect weapon to do as you please, as you say so much in SB. :)
     
  10. bhramos

    bhramos Elite Member Elite Member

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    see the difference
    [​IMG]
     
  11. Kunal Biswas

    Kunal Biswas Member of the Year 2011 Moderator

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Dha (sword)

    Dha (also spelled dah or dhaw) is the Burmese word for "knife." The term dha is conventionally used refer to a wide variety of knives and swords used by many people across Indochina, especially present-day Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Yunnan, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam.

    The broad use and diffusion of the dha across Southeast Asia makes it difficult to attribute a definitive origin. The Burmese moved into Southeast Asia from the northwest (present day India), passing thought Assam, including a region dominated by the Naga people called Nagaland. The dha and its variants were possibly derived from the Naga dao, a broadsword used by the Naga people of northeast India for digging as well as killing.[2] The Naga weapon was a thick, heavy, eighteen-inch long backsword with a bevel instead of a point, and this form of blade is found on some dha. Alternatively, the dha may have its origins with the Tai people who migrated to the area from what we know today as Yunnan Province in southern China. The Khmer and Mon peoples were well established before the arrival the Tai or the Burmese people; perhaps they invented the dha (13th C. reliefs discovered at Angkor depict dha). The history of the region includes many periods where one or the other of these groups dominated, bringing along their culture, including their weapons, to conquered areas.

    Similar terms exist in the surrounding area with slightly different meanings. The Chinese word dao (pronounced tou in Cantonese) means knife but can refer to any bladed weapon with only one edge. In Bengali, a dao is a six inch long knife. From the Himalayas, the dao spread to Southeast Asia where it came into its present shape. While it is pronounced dha in Burmese, among Khmer-speakers it is known as dao and some believe it is related to the Malay words for sword pedang and sundang. The dha itself is called krabi in Thai, but the equivalent Thai term is daab (ดาบ) which usually refers to a straight double-edge sword. The Thai term for knife is "meed." A related term, dap, means a long-handled sword in Malay.

    Dha vary considerably according to locality but they share a few features the define them apart from other weapons and tools of the area. These features are a round cross-section grip, a long, gently curving blade (sometimes upward, other times downward in the direction of use) with a single edge, and no guard. Knives and swords with these characteristics are viewed by ethnic groups of the region as being of a single type, albeit with variations arising from local style and tradition.[3] There are a large number of possible shapes for the tip, with upswept, downswept, squared-off and spear-like varieties all being found. The blades are often inscribed, which can range from a simple maker's mark to quite intricate designs that may also feature inlays.

    Hilts range from hand-width to quite long. A blade/hilt length ratio of 2:1 is not uncommon. Despite these long handles, most dha are meant for single-handed use, although some two-handed weapons exist. Guards are small, if present at all. Thai daab may have a guard similar to the tsuba of the Japanese katana. The montagnard dha may have a guard that barely exceeds the diameter of the handle and they can be regarded more as a spacer. The construction of the hilt varies widely by type and region or origin. Hilts range from simple wood, possibly wrapped in rattan or covered in ray skin, to elaborately worked silver and ivory. Pommels may or may not be present. Scabbards are made from two strips of wood, often bamboo, secured by metal bands, rattan (e.g., "village" dha), or completely wrapped in metal

    Dha (sword) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia





    Its a Dha..
     
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  12. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    There are four swords in his collection which have a hilt and pommel with Ivory and gold .Two resemble a katana.He has a total of 42 dha's in his collection only dha's they are even more arms with him and almost all of them are above 100 years old.The sword he gave me has been extensively used in combat
     
  13. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    If they are over 100 years old, please have them registered as Antiques or you could get into trouble!
     
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  14. Iamanidiot

    Iamanidiot Elite Member Elite Member

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    Done sir long back by my grand uncle i think
     
  15. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

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    What a prize !! :drool:
    Lucky you :thumb:
     
  16. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    Idiot i know you are resourceful, get the licence for the sword in your name and it is Antique so take a good care of it.
     
  17. Godless-Kafir

    Godless-Kafir DFI Buddha Senior Member

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    Ya right, you post some machete and its supposed to have been evolved from that. The names dont even sound similar, all swords look some what similar but your example is way of the mark to even bare any resemblance.
     
  18. Godless-Kafir

    Godless-Kafir DFI Buddha Senior Member

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    Nice one idiot, i like that sword. Take good care of your legacy.
     
  19. Virendra

    Virendra Moderator Moderator

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    If the blade isn't sharpened, he wouldn't need a license.
     
  20. niharjhatn

    niharjhatn Regular Member

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  21. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    even then it need licence.

    Idiot, i just checked arms act, it appears that in your case it does not need any licence. please check this.


    INDIAN ARMS RULES 1962
    SCHEDULE -I

    INDIAN ARMS ACT 1959

     
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