K-15 Shaurya

Discussion in 'Strategic Forces' started by LETHALFORCE, May 14, 2009.

  1. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    K 15 Missile: India Successfully tests submarine-based Nuclear capable missile


    K 15 Missile: India Successfully tests submarine-based Nuclear capable missile

    Posted on February 26, 2008

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    India successfully tesed a submarine-launched missile K-15 (earlier called as Sagarika) which can carry a nuclear warhead from an undersea location off the Orissa coast, a move that boosts the country’s deterrence capabilities.

    India, already capable of launching missiles from land and air, now moves a step closer to firing them from under the sea. With this test firing India is preparing to join select group of countries having this expertise. The countries already having this expertise are: U.S, Russia, France,U.K. and China.

    The K-15 missile is developed by Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO). According to Indian navy , nuclear submarine is expected to be be ready for sea trials by 2009.

    Powered by a turbojet, the missile can carry a 500-kg payload. It is 8.5 metres long and about a metre in diameter.
     
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  3. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    India test-fires N-powered water baby K-15



    India test-fires N-powered water baby K-15

    CNN-IBN


    New Delhi: India on Tuesday successfully test-fired the submarine-launched ballistic missile codenamed K-15, extending to sea India’s critical third leg of the nuclear triad.

    DRDO said the missile was launched from a pontoon located 50 metres underwater and was seen exiting the sea.

    K-15 is a two-stage missile with a range of 700 km and can carry a one-tonne nuclear warhead.

    The missile is planned to be integrated onto India's ATV, the indigenous nuclear submarine which will reportedly begin sea trials next year.

    Previously codenamed ‘Sagarika’, this missile has been test-fired five times earlier from underwater pontoons under a secret programme.

    This will give stealth and survivability to India's nuclear weapons which is critical in view of India's nuclear weapons policy of “no-first use".

    Believed to be named after former President A P J Abdul Kalam, the next challenge is integrating this weapon with the ATV, India's nuclear-powered submarine-in-the-making.

    This vessel is due for sea trials by next year. India has planned a fleet of three nuclear submarines by 2012 and its nuclear weapons posture is beginning to look more credible.

    Meanwhile, the US has endorsed India's test-firing of a submarine-launched ballistic missile.

    Visiting US Defence Secretary, Robert Gates indicated that India's growing nuclear weapons prowess is not seen as a threat by the US.

    "We don't particularly see the test firing of the missile as a risk," he said.
     
  4. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    India's first N-capable SLBM test-fired

    India's first N-capable SLBM test-fired

    INDIA SUCCESSFULLY test-fired its nuclear capable Submarine-launched Ballistic Missile (SLBM) K-15 from a defence base at Balasore in Orissa for the first time on Wednesday (November 12). The missile was launched from a land-based launcher.

    According to the defence sources, the SLBM K-15 has been successfully test-fired from the Integrated Test Range (ITR) at Chandipur in the district of Balasore, situated at a distance of 230 km from Bhubaneswar, the capital city of Orissa. The SLBM K-15 has two stages in its half-metre-wide body. It is able to carry a payload up to one tonne. The missile can pounce upon a target at a maximum distance of 700 kms.

    A few tests had been conducted earlier on the K-15 in an underwater platform. Today’s test was intended to check speed, trajectory, azimuth and other parameters of the K-15. This nuclear-capable K-15 missile is 11 metres long. While it is larger than the 8.5-metre-long Prithvi, the indigenous short-range ballistic missile, K-15 is smaller than the 15-metre-long Agni-1 ballistic missile.

    While speaking to the media, AC Padhiary, the district collector of Balasore said that the district administration evacuated temporarily about 3,010 people from five villages located within the two-km radius of the defence base hours before the test there.
     
  5. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  6. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Sagarika / K-15 / Shourya / Nirbhay
    Sagarika / K-15 / Shourya / Nirbhay
    While published reports are generally consistent about the characteristics and chronology of this system, there is general disagreement on one fundamental point, whether the missile is a ballistic missile or a cruise missile. The reported physical dimensions of the missile seem to support the reporting that it is a cruise missile. Sagarika appears to be the designation of the sea-based version of the missile which is designated Shourya when deployed on a land-based Transporter Erector Launcher. The K-15 launch sile is well attested, and appears to be intended for the Advanced Tehnology Vessel nuclear submarine. It is, however, far too large for the Sagarika missile. It is reasonable to believe that this launcher would initially be employed with 3 Sagarika cruise missiles in each tube, which could subsequently be back-fitted with a single Agni-III ballistic missile.

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    Sagarika (Oceanic)
    Started in the early 1990s, DRDO was reported to have developed a 300-km submarine-launched ballistic missile, Sagarika, based on the Prithvi. The program is reported to have started in 1992 and was originally reported to involve adapting a ramjet engine to the missile to reduce the need for heavy oxidizers. In 1994 the periodical Flight International reported that India's Aeronautical Development Establishment (ADE) had for the past two years been engaged in designing a ramjet-powered, submarine-launched missile dubbed the Sagarika. Other reports state that Sagarika was initially designed as a solid-fuelled version of the Prithvi. But the idea was shelved after the navy indicated its preference for a cruise missile. India did not have a submarine configured for launching ballistic missiles.

    In October 2005 it was reported that India was developing the Sagarika, said to be a submarine-launched cruise missile with a range of about 300 km.

    Something about the Sagarika inspires a cloak of secrecy. In 2005 defence minister Pranab Mukherjee confirmed the program: “This is a DRDO project but we would not like to make a premature advertisement.” Later, in Parliament, he denied the project even existed. As late as 2006 one observer suggested that the Sagarika was merely a figment of the Non-Proliferation community’s imagination

    In April 2007 it was reported that the indigenously-built Sagarika cruise missile, with a range of nearly 1,000 km and a 500-kg warhead, had two variants capable of being launched from aircraft and submarines. Sagarika was said to be the primary armament for the long-delayed Advanced Technology Vessel indigenous nuclear submarine, and the IAF was said to be considering equipping the forthcoming Medium Transport Aircraft with the stand-off missile. And in June 2007 it was reported that DRDO was currently working on the Sagarika submarine launched cruise missile. The nuclear capable Sagarika was said to have the capability to carry a 500 kg warhead over a distance of 1,000 km. It is also planned to develop an air launched version of Sagarika.

    In April 2007 India conducated a test of the Sagarika from a submersible pontoon launcher.

    In July 2007 it was reported that India's Defense Research and Development Organization (DRDO) had started work on three new types of missiles: a superior version of the Agni III, a hypersonic BrahMos and a naval missile known as Sagarika. The Sagarika would be a submarine launched, nuclear-armed, missile with a range of 1000 kilometers.

    On 27 February 2008 India proved that it had the capability to launch missiles from underwater by successfully test-firing the Sagarika missile from a pontoon off the coast of Visakhapatnam. The pontoon simulated the conditions of a submarine. Shortly after noon, the missile's booster ignited and Sagarika rose from the pontoon. It impacted the sea over 700 km away. A Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) missile technologist said "It has been consistently successful. This is not the first time that we have launched the missile. We have done it earlier a few times although it went by different names."

    This test, the sixth test of the 700-km range Sagarika missile, completed its goal of having air, land and sea ballistic systems, the defence ministry said. The launch from a submerged pontoon took place off India’s southeast coast near the port city of Visakhapatnam around 1:00 pm (0730 GMT), a defence ministry spokesman said. With the latest test, India joins an elite group — the United States, Russia, France and China — that has such ability. The test came two months after India’s chief military scientist M. Natarajan said New Delhi would test a ballistic missile with a range of 6,000 kilometers in 2008.

    The tactical, submarine-to-surface missile was said to be a light, miniaturised system, which was about 6.5 meters long and weighed seven tons. Powered by solid propellants, it was reported to be able to carry a payload of about 500 kg and can be launched from different platforms - from the ground, from underwater and mobile launchers. Other reports said the missile was powered by a turbojet, could carry a 500-kg payload, and was 8.5 metres long and about a metre in diameter. Ultimately, it will be launched from the indigenous nuclear powered submarine under construction at Kalpalrkam in Tamil Nadu and Visakhapatnam. The missile can carry both nuclear and conventional warheads.

    Sagarika was developed at the DRDOs missile complex in Hyderabad. The complex consists of the Defence Research and Development Laboratory (DRDL), the Advanced Systems Laboratory (ASL) and the Research Center, Imarat (RCI). The missile was designed and developed by the DRDL, the ASL provided the motors and propulsion systems. The RCI's contribution was in avionics, including control and guidance systems and inertial navigation systems.

    In July 2008 DDRO was reported to be near breakthrough in test firing the country's first underwater launch ballistic missile, Sagarika. Sagarika had already been test-fired from a pontoon, but now DRDO is planning a full-fledged test of the missile from a submarine and for this purpose may use the services of a Russian Amur class submarine.

    Project K-15 Launcher
    The Project K-15 launcher was designed and developed for testing of missiles. The system was been delivered to the user in 2004 and mounted inside a pontoon. Design by analysis approach has been adopted for final configuration of the launcher. The material used for launcher structure is high-strength-lowalloy (HSLA) steel. Sets of guide rails are bolted to the container to hold the launcher. Advanced fabrication technology has been used to ensure the desired perpendicularity, parallesim and concentricity. A 2.3 m static seal, which restricts water ingress to the bottom of the container, was designed and experimentally validated for extreme hydrostatic pressure.

    Platform launcher has been designed for launching medium range surface-to-surface missiles. It comprises a launcher structure, a set of shock isolation systems, a set of launcher locking mechanism, a set of special seals and a connector alignment mechanisms for connector blind mating. The launcher structure is having precision dimensional features for perfect interfacing with the missile and other subsystems. The structure is made of special high strength stainless steel for a maintenance-free service life. This material does not need any corrosion protection against any aggressive marine environment.

    The shock isolation systems protect the launcher against shock load. The shock isolation systems comprise disc spring stacks in longitudinal direction and elastic beams in lateral direction. This particular non-conventional combination takes care of compactness and mode decoupling. The locking mechanism locks the shock isolation suspension system and provide rigid support during launch operation. It is a fail-safe all mechanical device. The 2.4 m diameter diaphragm seal prevents water entrance and flexes when the launcher vibrates on the shock isolation mounts. The seal has been developed based on steel reinforced radial tire technology. The connector alignment mechanism has all six degrees of freedom and, therefore, capable to take care of any misalignment within the envisaged limit during blind mating of connector.

    In early 2008 India announced that it had perfected the technology for launching missiles from a submerged submarine. That meant the silo design had been perfected as well.

    K-15 Missile
    DRDO is working on the K-15 SLBM, having tested it from submersible pontoon launchers, with the aim to integrate it on the indigenous nuclear submarines being built under the secretive ATV (advanced technology vessel) project. Though not in the range of the over 5,000-km SLBMs in the arsenal of US, Russia and China, the 750-km range K-15 will accord India with the desperately-needed third leg of the nuclear weapon triad.

    The launch of the K-15 Sagarika missile on 26 February 2008 from a submerged pontoon in the Bay of Bengal simulated the conditions of a submarine launch. India, for the first time on Wednesday 12 November 2008, test-fired from a defence base in Orissa its submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) K-15 from a land-based launcher. It was test-fired successfully from the Integrated Test Range (ITR) at Chandipur in the district of Balasore, about 230 km from state capital Bhubaneswar. The test was intended to check speed, trajectory, azimuth and other parameters of the missile. The missile had earlier undergone a few tests in an underwater platform.

    The K-15 missile has two stages fitted into its half-meter diameter body. It can carry a payload up to one ton and has a maximum range of 700 km. The K-15 missile has a length of around 11 meters [other reports say only 7 meters], larger than the 8.5-meters-long Prithvi short-range ballistic missile but smaller than the 15-meter-long Agni-1 ballistic missile - both of which have a diameter of 1 meter, twice that reported for the K-15.

    Shourya (Valor)
    On 12 November 2008 India conducted the fourth successful test of its K15 Sagarika SLBM (Sea Launched Ballistic Missile). This test was from a land-based missile silo. In the last few tests, the metal silo was being tested as well. The K-15 seven ton has a 1,000 kilometer range, and a half ton payload. India test fired the submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) K-15 from a land-based launcher from Orissa. The land based version is named as ‘Shourya’.

    The Shourya missile is said to be about 10 meters long. It can carry warheads weighing more than 500 kg. W. Selvamurthy, Chief Controller (R&D), DRDO, said the Shourya missile provided the country with “a second strike capability” because it was a variant of the under-water launched K-15 missile (Sagarika). “We can keep the missile in a secured position [silo] to carry either conventional or nuclear warheads,” Dr. Selvamurthy said. Reportedly, although the Shourya needed a silo with a maximum depth of 50 meters to lift off, it could be launched from 30-meter deep silos [these numbers are too big, and don't make much sense]. It had a booster which fired underground and another which fired in the air.

    The DRDO termed as “successful” the flight-test of the ‘Shourya’ missile system from the Interim Test Range (ITR) at Balasore in Orissa at 1125 hours 12 November 2008. The “Shourya” missile "flew at five times the speed of sound, that is Mach 5, for 300 km” of its 600-km range, according to M. Natarajan, Scientific Adviser to the Defence Minister. Its velocity gradually tapered off during the remaining 300 km of its flight and then it plunged vertically over the targeted site in the Bay of Bengal. What was outstanding about the Shourya’s success was the performance of its indigenous navigation system with the help of a ring-laser gyroscope, Mr. Natarajan said. He called it “a sophisticated navigation and guidance system produced by the Research Centre, Imarat” (RCI) in Hyderabad.

    The missile was test fired from a 30-40 feet deep pit with in-built canister specially designed for this purpose. There was no water in the pit. The missile has a range of 600 km and flight duration of 485 seconds. The test was intended to check speed, trajectory, azimuth and other parameters of the missile. What was outstanding about the Shourya’s success was the performance of its indigenous navigation system with the help of a ring-laser gyroscope, according to M. Natarajan, Scientific Adviser to the Defence Minister.

    According to one report Shourya can reach targets 700 km away, carrying both conventional and nuclear warheads. It is 10 meters long and 74 cm in diameter and weighs 6.2 tonnes. It is a two-stage missile and both its stages are powered by solid propellants. Its flight time is 500 seconds to 700 seconds. It can carry warheads weighing more than 500 kg.

    The missile has a unique feature of simplicity of operation and maintenance. It can be easily handled, transported and stored within the canister for longer shelf life. The missile, encased in a canister, is mounted on a single vehicle, which has only a driver’s cabin, and the vehicle itself is the launch platform. This “single vehicle solution” reduces its signature – it cannot be easily detected by satellites – and makes its deployment easy. The composite canister make the missile much easier to store for long periods without maintenance as well as to handle and transport. It also houses the gas generator to eject the missile from the canister before its solid propellant motors take over to hurl it at the intended target.

    The high manoeuvrability of the missile makes it less vulnerable to available anti-missile defence systems. The missile performed a maneuver of rolling to spread the heat uniformly on its surface. Its high manoeuvrability makes it less vulnerable to present-day anti-missile defence systems.

    Nirbhay
    In mid-2007 it was reported that India was developing a new medium-range, multi-platform missile, called the Nirbhay [Dauntless or Fearless], that was slated to be tested by end-2009. The missile, with a range of 1,000 km, was being developed at the Advanced Systems Laboratory (ASL), a unit of the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) under the defence ministry. The latest in the series of India's missile development programme, the Nirbhay follows the Agni (I, II and III), the Prithvi (I and II), the Indo-Russian joint venture supersonic Brahmos, Akash, Trishul and Nag.

    "It (Nirbhay) will be better than Babur," explained Avinash Chander, director of ASL, referring to Pakistan's first subsonic, low-level terrain-mapping missile, developed originally with a 500 km range and later upgraded to 700 km. First tested in 2005, the Babur is similar in design to the US BGM-109 Tomahawk land attack cruise missile-the two being roughly the same size and shape. Pakistan is said to be working on a more advanced version with a range of 1,000 km.

    The subsonic Nirbhay weighs 1,000 kg with a 1,000 km range and a speed of 0.7 mach. A missile is subsonic when its speed is less than the speed of sound (1 mach). Nirbhay was said to be six meters in length with a 520 mm diameter. While the missile was being developed in-house, India was looking at partnerships for the engine. The requirement for Nirbhay was anticipated by India's three armed forces. Nirbhay is to have multiple platforms and can be launched from ground, sea and air.
     
  7. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    India test-fires submarine missile from land

    India test-fires submarine missile from land
    By siliconindia news bureau
    Thursday,13 November 2008, 03:17 hrs

    Balasore: India Wednesday test-fired a submarine ballistic missile (SLBM) Shauriya from land for the first time, defence sources said.

    It was test fired successfully from the Integrated Test Range (ITR) at Chandipur in the district of Balasore in Orissa, about 230 km from state capital Bhubaneswar.


    The missile has two stages fitted into its half-metre-wide body. It can carry a payload up to one tonne and has a highest range of 700 km.

    The missile had earlier undergone three tests previously in an underwater platform. The Wednesday test was intended to check speed, trajectory, maximum height and other parameters of the missile.

    The new weapon, a K-15 missile, is an undersea submarine-launched ballistic missile with a range of up to 435 miles. The K-15 missile has a length of around 11 metres, larger than the 8.5-metre-long Prithvi short-range ballistic missile but smaller than the 15-metre-long Agni-1 ballistic missile.

    The district administration evacuated temporarily about 3,010 people from about five villages located within the a two-km radius of the defence base hours before the test in the area, district collector A.C. Padhiary told IANS.

    According to an Associated Press report, India and longtime rival Pakistan routinely test-fire missiles. They usually notify each other ahead of missile launches in keeping with an agreement between the two nations. India test-fired the K-15 missile from a pontoon immersed in the sea earlier this year. India's current crop of missiles are mostly intended for confronting neighboring archrival Pakistan.

    The Agni 3, in contrast, is India's longest-range missile, designed to reach 1,900 miles � putting China's major cities well into range, as well as targets deep in the Middle East.

    India and Pakistan have fought three wars since their independence from Britain in 1947. They have been holding peace talks since 1994 aimed at resolving their differences, including their dispute over the Himalayan region of Kashmir.
     
  8. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    K 15 land version missile pic ???

    K 15 land version missile pic ???

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    this is possibly pic of K 15 land launcher from DRDO, pic is taken from Chindits
     
  9. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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  10. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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  11. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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    here is the only known pic

    thumbnail attached.
     
  12. sayareakd

    sayareakd Moderator Moderator

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  13. Sridhar

    Sridhar House keeper Moderator

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    Yes it is Shaurya

    Friday, January 22, 2010 DRDO participation in Republic Day Parade 2010

    As every year, this year also DRDO will be parading some of their products on the Republic Day. While some of the products already inducted by Indian Army will be forming part of Army’s contingent, other products will be shown under DRDO banner.
    The equipments that are being displayed by DRDO in the Republic Day parade for the first time are :


      1. Light Combat Aircraft - Tejas
      2. Shaurya Missile
      3. Rohini Radar
    Brute Gorilla: DRDO participation in Republic Day Parade 2010
     
  14. Sridhar

    Sridhar House keeper Moderator

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    Aren't we got some pics from a silo launch. Or you mean the launcher or you mean they are different missiles
     
  15. Rahul Singh

    Rahul Singh Senior Member Senior Member

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    Looks like this photo is new and is from Rajpath, where practices and rehearsal for this years RD parade is going on..
     
  16. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Shaurya Missile

    http://knol.google.com/k/vijainder-k-thakur/shaurya-missile/yo54fmdhy2mq/25#

    Shaurya Missile





    [​IMG]



    Technology demonstrator canisterized nuclear capable missile.
    Derived from the Sagarika missile developed under the K-15 project, Shaurya is being offered to the services as an important component of the Indian quest for a credible landbased nuclear deterrent.
    Contents

    Missile
    Missile Characteristics
    Mobility
    Shaurya Tests
    DefExpo 2010 Visuals






    Missile
    Shaurya is a surface-to-surface tactical missile with a range of 750-km and a payload of about one ton for use by the Army and Navy. It can carry both conventional as well as nuclear warheads.

    The missile range is likely to be much longer with a lighter nuclear warhead.

    It has been designed as a canister stored and launched missile for use by the Army and for launch from submerged submarines.

    The missile's warhead can manoeuvre to evade enemy defenses.

    The solid propellant, two-staged missile is little over 10 meters in length and about half-a-meter in width.

    Missile Characteristics
    Shaurya is a two stage, solid fueled weapon with characteristics of both ballistic and cruise missiles. Unlike conventional cruise missile which cruise at extremely low altitudes and subsonic speeds using turbo fan engines, Shaura cruises at extremely high altitudes at hypersonic speeds using rocket power.

    Its first stage lofts it to 40 km. altitude. The second stage is used for cursing towards the target while maneuvering with an aim of rendering interception difficult. During the endgame, the missile guides itself to the target.

    DRDO claims the missile is capable of striking within 20-30 metres of its target after travelling 750 kilometres.

    Speaking to the press at DefExpo 2010, DRDO Chief VK Sarsawat said, "Like a ballistic missile, it is powered by solid fuel. And, like a cruise missile, it can guide itself right up to the target."

    Mobility
    'Shaurya' can be canisterized for mobility and launched from silos making its detection and targeting in an enemy first strike difficult.

    Once sealed in a canister, it can be taken to any place giving it great tactical and operational advantage. It can be deployed anywhere - in hilly terrain, desert etc. It is a relatively light, highly mobile, solid propellant fuelled missile. There is no preparation required.

    DRDO will take up production of the missile as per the requirement of the services.

    Shaurya Tests

    Shaurya was first tested at 11.25 am on Wednesday, November 12, 2008 from Complex-3 of the Integrated Test Range at Chandipur.

    The missile was launched vertically from an underground facility with an in-built canister.

    "The missile was test fired from a 30-40 feet deep pit with in-built canister specially designed for the purpose. There was no water in the pit," a source said.

    The missile flew to its target in 485 secs.

    The missile uses a ring laser gyro developed by the DRDO for use on the Agni III missile.

    "Since the missile is fired from underground, it cannot be detected by conventional satellite imaging," Dr. Selvamurthy said.

    Shourya could get through the air defense of an adversary country because it was highly manoeuvrable, Dr. Selvamurthy said.


     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 10, 2015
  17. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://www.business-standard.com/in...as-india\s-underwater-nuclear-missile/385952/


    Shaurya surfaces as India's underwater nuclear missile


    The country’s top defence scientist has, for the first time, revealed that India’s new Shaurya missile, which can carry a one-tonne nuclear warhead over 750 kilometers, is specially designed to be fired from Indian submarines and could form the crucial third leg of India’s nuclear deterrent.

    If launched from a submarine off the China coast, it could hit several Chinese cities like Beijing, Nanjing and Shanghai.

    Air and land-based nuclear weapons are delivered to their targets by fighter aircraft and ballistic missiles, respectively. Since these can be knocked out by an enemy first strike, the most reliable nuclear deterrent has traditionally been underwater, missiles hidden in a submarine.

    V K Saraswat, the DRDO chief and Scientific Advisor to the Defence Minister, revealed to Business Standard at the ongoing Defexpo 2010, “We have designed the Shaurya so that it can be launched from under water as easily as from land. The gas-filled canister that houses the missile fits easily into a submarine. The underwater leg of the nuclear triad needs to be totally reliable and needs a state-of-the-art missile.”

    India’s undersea deterrent had so far revolved around the K-15 ballistic missile, built with significant help from Russia. The K-15 was to equip the INS Arihant, India’s lone nuclear-powered submarine, which is being constructed in Visakhapatnam. But now, after rigorous underwater testing, the Shaurya could be the mainstay of Arihant’s arsenal.

    “The Shaurya was developed from ground up as a submarine-capable missile,” confirms Dr Prahlada, the top DRDO scientist responsible for liaising with the military. “Every piece of technology for fitting it in a submarine is already in place.”

    Shortly before the Defexpo 2010, Dr Saraswat had publicly stated that India’s missile technology was ahead of China’s and Pakistan’s.

    Now top DRDO scientists have revealed that the Shaurya is not a ballistic missile, as it has been thought to be; it is actually a hypersonic cruise missile, which never leaves the atmosphere.

    A ballistic missile is like a stone being lobbed towards a target. Rockets toss it upwards and towards the target; after the rocket burns out, gravity pulls the missile warhead down towards the target. Buffeted by wind and re-entry forces, accuracy is a problem; and, since the ballistic missile’s path is predictable, shooting it down is relatively easy.

    The Shaurya has none of these issues. Its solid-fuel, two-stage rocket accelerates the missile to six times the speed of sound before it reaches an altitude of 40 kilometers (125,000 feet), after which it levels out and cruises towards the target, powered by its onboard fuel.

    While ballistic missiles cannot correct their course midway, the Shaurya is an intelligent missile. Onboard navigation computers kick in near the target, guiding the missile to the target and eliminating errors that inevitably creep in during its turbulent journey.

    The Shaurya, say DRDO sources, will strike within 20-30 metres of its target after travelling 750 kilometres.

    Conventional cruise missiles, like the American Tomahawk and the Indo-Russian Brahmos, offer similar accuracy. But their air-breathing engines carry them along slowly, rendering them vulnerable to enemy aircraft and missiles. The Shaurya’s solid-fuel, air-independent engine propels it along at hypersonic speeds, leaving enemy fighters and missiles far behind.

    “I would say the Shaurya is a hybrid propulsion missile”, says Dr Saraswat. “Like a ballistic missile, it is powered by solid fuel. And, like a cruise missile, it can guide itself right up to the target.”

    Making the Shaurya even more capable is its ability to manoeuvre, following a twisting path to the target that makes it very difficult to shoot it down. In contrast, a ballistic missile is predictable; its trajectory gives away its target and its path to it.
     
  18. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://www.defencetalk.com/india-successfully-test-fires-shaurya-missile-16229/

    India Successfully Test-Fires Shaurya Missile


    India has successfully test fired 'Shaurya', a medium-range surface-to-surface ballistic missile on Wednesday, to be used by its Army.

    With a 600-km range, the missile is capable of hitting targets deep inside Pakistan and China.

    The indigenous missile was launched from an underground facility with an in-built canister at 11.25 am from Complex-3 of the Integrated Test Range at Chandipur, DRDO sources said here.

    The sleek missile, with a flight duration of 485 seconds, roared into the sky leaving behind a thick yellow and white smoke on a clear sunny day, they added.

    The sophisticated tactical missile is capable of carrying conventional warheads with a payload of about one tonne.

    "With longer shelf-life, as it is stored in a canister just like the BrahMos supersonic cruise missile, the Shaurya is easily transportable and user-friendly. This is a technology development project," DRDO sources said.

    Though there was speculation that the missile was a land version of the under development K-15 submarine-launched ballistic missile, DRDO sources said the surface-to-surface missile had nothing to do with K-15 'Sagarika' project.

    "The missile was test fired from a 30-40 feet deep pit with in-built canister specially designed for the purpose. There was no water in the pit," the sources said.
     
  19. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://ibnlive.in.com/news/india-tries-second-strike-capability-missle-shaurya/78030-11.html

    India tries second strike capability missle Shaurya


    New Delhi: India is beefing up its nuclear second strike capability.
    On Wednesday, it revealed a new generation ballistic missile, Shaurya, which is aimed at evading enemy detection.
    This 600-km range sub-surface weapon is a variant of the undersea K-15, widely considered India's biggest missile breakthrough.

    The missile which is meant to be fired from underground silos will give India more options to hit back, in case it is attacked with nuclear weapons.
    The Shaurya is capable of carrying a 1-ton nuclear bomb, is a quick-reaction missile fired from a canister.

    This seems a throwback to the Cold War years and is in sharp contrast to other nuclear missiles which have mobile launchers.
    However, scientists insist that this will increase India's options for a second strike capability which is critical in view of its nuclear weapons policy of No First Use.
    Chief Controller, Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) Dr W Selvamurthy says, "When you talk of second strike capability, it means that when the mobile moves on surface whether on rail or on road, it will easily be detected by either intelligence or from the satellite imaging, but in this case, if you keep it either underwater or underground, certainly you won't be able to detect it. It is very difficult to detect."

    It is likely that it will replace the 8.5-metre-long Prithvi short-range missiles.

    The game of nuclear deterrence has now moved to ensuring survivability of weapons and the missile race show no signs of ending.
     
  20. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    http://www.hinduonnet.com/2008/11/14/stories/2008111462151500.htm

    “Shourya missile cannot be easily detected”


    T.S. Subramanian



    It has high manoeuvrability, says DRDO Director-General





    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Indigenous navigation system worked well

    “Shourya has given India a second strike capability”


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    CHENNAI: The “Shourya” missile that was test-fired successfully on Wednesday “flew at five times the speed of sound, that is Mach 5, for 300 km” of its 600-km range, according to M. Natarajan, Scientific Adviser to the Defence Minister. Its velocity gradually tapered off during the remaining 300 km of its flight and then it plunged vertically over the targeted site in the Bay of Bengal.

    What was outstanding about the Shourya’s success was the performance of its indigenous navigation system with the help of a ring-laser gyroscope, Mr. Natarajan said on Thursday. He called it “a sophisticated navigation and guidance system produced by the Research Centre, Imarat” (RCI) in Hyderabad.

    “We flew our own navigation system in this missile. It worked very well. This is an important step forward for the country in the navigation of missiles, aircraft and spacecraft,” he said. No country would provide India this navigation system.

    After the Shourya was fired from its canister, it rose to a height of 50 km and then flew horizontally to reach its targeted site. As it reached its maximum speed, it led to the missile heating up to 700 degrees Celsius. To cool the missile, it was rolled.

    “We did a rolling manoeuvre which gives uniform heat to the missile,” said Mr. Natarajan, who is also Director-General, Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO).

    He watched the test-firing of the new missile from the Integrated Test Range (ITR) at Chandipur-on-sea, Balasore, Orissa. Shourya is a product of the DRDO. The missile’s Programme Director was A.K. Chakrabarti.

    While about 2,000 degrees Celsius was generated when Agni series of missiles re-entered the atmosphere, only several hundred degrees Celsius was generated during Shourya’s re-entry.

    The missile had high manoeuvrability. So it could not be easily detected by the enemy, Mr. Natarajan said. Shourya is about 10 metres long. It can carry warheads weighing more than 500 kg.

    W. Selvamurthy, Chief Controller (R&D), DRDO, said the Shourya missile provided the country with “a second strike capability” because it was a variant of the under-water launched K-15 missile (Sagarika). “We can keep the missile in a secured position [silo] to carry either conventional or nuclear warheads,” Dr. Selvamurthy said.

    DRDO sources said that although the Shourya needed a silo with a maximum depth of 50 metres to lift off, it could be launched from 30-metre deep silos. It had a booster which fired underground and another which fired in the air.
     
  21. Armand2REP

    Armand2REP CHINI EXPERT Veteran Member

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    If the CEP is that good then it can be used as a conventional attack missile. It would make it better than Iskander.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2010

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