Journalists, Media Channels and their agenda

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by pmaitra, Feb 23, 2011.

  1. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Dear all DFI members.

    We all have our likes and dislikes about different media sources, newspapers, news-channels and online news portals. For convenience, I will refer to them as News Source.

    News Sources can be:
    • balanced
    • right wing
    • left wing
    • political mouthpieces
    • government controlled
    • privately owned
    • owned or edited by persons having their own political biases

    I would like to have a discussion on which news channels are reliable, trustworthy and which ones are not.
     
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  3. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Our Enlightened Indian Media!

    Radia effect on PM’s invitees for TV pow-wow?
    16 February 2011

    Prime minister Manmohan Singh‘s much ballyhooed pow-wow with “editors” of television channels to clear the air over the scams dogging his government, was, as was to be expected, a typically tepid, bureaucratic affair.

    Only the national English TV channels—Headlines Today (represented by Aroon Purie), CNN-IBN (Rajdeep Sardesai), NDTV 24×7 (Prannoy Roy), Times Now (Arnab Goswami)—were interested in asking questions (and suplementaries, much to media advisor Harish Khare‘s discomfiture) about corruption.

    Most of the rest, be they from regional channels like Sun TV, Calcutta TV or Asianet, or “international channels” like BBC and Al-Jazeera, were content with asking questions relevant to their audiences and markets (Tamil Nadu, West Bengal, Assam, Europe, Middle East).

    Questions are already doing the rounds on why some sizeable channels like Star News, TV9, etc, went unrepresented. And rumours are already doing the rounds on why at least one sizeable editor was absent.

    Radhika Ramaseshan reports in The Telegraph, Calcutta:

    “The owner of an English channel had been requested to be present instead of deputing a colleague.

    “The owner-editor of another Delhi-based channel was also told he would be welcome. Other channels were sent a general invite.

    “The caution came against the backdrop of the Niira Radia tapes featuring conversations of some journalists.”

    Also read: Did Niira Radia tapes have impact on Padma awards?

    ****************************************


    Respected Dr Roy,

    I am writing to apply for the post of Group Editor, English News, NDTV.

    I am a journalist with 26 years’ experience. Throughout my career I have made innocent mistakes. I have been silly, I have been gullible and I have been prone to making errors of judgement.

    Frequently, when I am “desperate for khabar” I also fib to sources. I string them along so much that I have often tied myself up in knots.

    In short, I’m just the right guy to lead the nation’s most reputed English news channel.

    I am aware, Sir, that you already have a silly, innocent and gullible editor prone to making honest errors of judgement. Those credentials were so clearly established on national prime time news the other day. Only an extremely innocent, very silly and highly gullible editor can do it with such aplomb.

    Admittedly, Dr Roy, that’s a tough record to beat. But the silly are never daunted by the odds…recall that stuff about fools rushing in where angels fear to tread.

    I take heart from two facts: One, that you are perhaps the only editor-in-chief to value such sterling qualities in a group editor, and two, while you might be pretty happy with your in-house options, there are some good alternatives in the market you might want to look at.

    It is your faith in and commitment to the cause of the ISGs (innocent, silly and gullible), Dr Roy, that has emboldened me to give the job a shot. I want to convince you that when it comes to these sterling qualities, I dig a lonely furrow… it’s actually a deep trench because I have been at it for 26 years.

    Sir, I suspect you will be extremely upset at the completely unconventional way in which this application is being framed. So, let me quickly give you three examples of the work I have done so far. Please judge me only by my work, not what I say about it on tape.

    1. When I was just a few months into the profession, Akali Dal leader Sant Longowal was assassinated. His assassination followed Indira Gandhi’s who was killed just a few months earlier. I had just subbed the copy when my chief sub asked me, “what’s the headline?” “Longowal calls on Indira Gandhi,” I read out loud and proud.

    The chief sub leaped out of her chair in horror and grabbed the copy. She called me silly and stupid. She even proclaimed me “dangerous” and banished me from the news desk.

    You see, Dr Roy, I was editor material even then. Just that I was in wrong hands. Where were you, Dr Roy? I can’t help wondering, “why just Barkha, why is she so lucky”?

    2. Once when I was editor of a small Delhi afternoon paper, we ran an expose on upcoming illegal structures in Connaught Place. We illustrated the story with a big picture of a multi-storey building shot stealthily. Next morning it turned out the building belonged to the newspaper’s proprietor.

    Error of judgement is passé, Dr Roy, I have monumental blunders on my hand.

    3. More recently, I was in the middle of writing Counterfeit, my most most-read weekly column on notional affairs. Two big corporate houses were warring over some goddamn national asset and I wanted to get to the bottom of things. Who better to get an insight from than the PR persons on both sides?

    The first guy took me out to lunch and explained his client’s position. I was fully convinced he was right till the other PR took me out to lunch and explained her client’s position. I was convinced she was right too.

    But I was two full, two convinced and too confused. So, I wrote about the food instead.

    But then word got out. As you well know, our strict code of ethics lays down that a journalist can have only one free meal per topic. Fellow journalists were livid. But since nobody could prove quid pro quo, they pilloried me in public for being unethical and accused me in private of selling the profession cheap.

    I am however convinced most of them were just jealous of the extra meal I managed…but that’s beside the point, the pillorying continued because they said “joh pakda gaya wahi chor”.

    I had to take matters into my hand because the cat seemed to have gotten my channel’s tongue. I agreed to be grilled by my peers in full public glare. Four white haired gents turned up. For the first time the channel made a departure from the policy of not putting out any raw material on air and played the full unedited tape.

    On air I made a clean breast of things. “I may have been greedy, I may have been hungry, but nobody dare accuse me of corruption,” I said, clearly setting the contours of the debate. “But of course, it’s been a learning experience. Looking back now with all that one now knows about dirty lobbyists, I have no hesitation in saying that it’s perhaps best to carry one’s own lunch box to work. I have since bought a Milton electric lunch box.”

    “No journalist is lily white,” the oldest and gentlest of them all began, “I don’t know of many journalists who carry their tiffin to office….” but I cut him short. ”Nobody is lily white but all that you will discuss is one spot on my kurta? Why only me,” I thundered. I wanted to punch all of them in their holier-than-thou faces but for form’s sake I just bit my dry lips and somehow held my temper and my hand.

    Many close friends upbraided me for appearing on the show. They told me I looked angry, sounded pompous and arrogant. They advised me not to mention the incident in this application because it would look rather silly trying to get an important job on the evidence of this show.

    But that is the point I’m trying to make, Dr Roy. I am silly. And I did not stumble on silliness, innocence and gullibility “inadvertently” after 16 years of blemish-less journalism. I worked at it for 26 long years.

    In other qualifications, I must point out that I am a damn good political reporter, even if I say so myself. In the thick of things such as the UPA’s cabinet formation, all kinds of people call me to carry messages to the Congress party. Sometimes there are problems of non-delivery such as that message I did not give Ghulam Nabi Azad but I believe, because I’m a good journalist, even if this were about the NDA forming its cabinet, I would still be a busy courier boy.

    I would have loved to attach copies of my work as a political reporter but sadly, Dr Roy, I have none. That is because I have never reported politics.

    I know, I know…that is not consistent with my claim to being a good political journalist. I was just stringing you along, Dr Roy.

    When can I join?

    Yours sincerely

    B.V. Rao

    ***

    B.V. Rao is the editor of Governance Now, where this piece originally appeared

    ******************************************

    The PTI journo who scooped Obama interview
    5 November 2010

    For weeks ahead of US President Barack Obama‘s full visit to India in his first term in office, speculation was who would get the prized pre-tour interview.

    The buzz was that The Times of India would get the print interview given its reach, while NDTV would get the television interview. NDTV’s Prannoy Roy was said to be camping in Washington, DC.

    There was even speculation that Obama would give one-on-one interviews to a clutch of representatives of Indian media houses so that no one felt shortchanged.

    But, in the end, an unlikely news source got the Obama interview first: Press Trust of India (PTI). And the man who secured the interview? Lalit K. Jha, the news agency’s principal US correspondent (in picture).

    The Delhi University history honours graduate and Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan journalism diploma holder’s interview made it to the front pages of most papers, but only The Indian Express gave him a byline.

    The former Hindu and Hindustan Times reporter, with 12 years in the business, has been based in the United States since 2005, serving as North America correspondent for a number of South Asian publications, including a Burmese magazine and the Afghan news agency.

    Photograph: Jay Mandal/ On Assignment, courtesy Lalit K. Jha

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    Posted in People, For the record, Newspapers | 1 Comment »
    Tags: NDTV, The Times of India, The Hindu, Churumuri, Hindustan Times, The Indian Express, Sans Serif, Prannoy Roy, Barack Obama, PTI, Lalit K Jha, Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan, Jay Mandal
    10 media barons in India Today power list of 50
    12 March 2010

    Ronnie Screwvala of UTV, and Prannoy Roy and Radhika Roy of NDTV, are the three prominent media names missing in India Today magazine’s annual ranking of the 50 most powerful people in India for the year of the lord, 2010.

    Otherwise, this year’s list comprise the usual barons: Samir Jain and Vineet Jain of The Times of India group at No.8; Kalanidhi Maran of Sun TV at No. 16 (up eight places from last year); Raghav Bahl of TV18 at No. 17 (down from No. 15); Subhash Chandra of Zee at No. 22; Ramesh Agarwal and Sudhir Agarwal of Dainik Bhaskar and DNA at No. 30 (up five places from last year); Mahendra Mohan Gupta and Sanjay Gupta of Dainik Jagran at No. 33 (up from 39) ; and Rajeev Chandrasekhar of Asianet and Suvarna at No. 37 (up from 46, although India Today strangely claims he is a new entrant).

    But the printer’s devil is in the details.

    India Today says Vineet Jain is obsessive about the photogallery of Indiatimes, Samir about the layout of ToI‘s editorial page (an obsession that began in 1989); Maran, an amateur radio operator, is the highest-paid executive in India earning Rs 37 crore per annum; Bahl will publish a book on the political economy of India and China this August; Mahendra Mohan Gupta has acquired an Audi Q7; and Rajeev Chandrasekhar wears Canali suits or jackets, Stemar shoes and Jaeger le Coultre watches.

    Also read: 26% of India’s most powerful are media barons

    The 11 habits of India’s most powerful media pros

    A columnist more powerful than all the media barons

    A house for Dr & Mrs Roy at Rs 270,000,000

    An A-list most A-listers don’t want to be a part of

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    Posted in People, A bit of fun, Television, Newspapers, Magazines | Leave a Comment »
    Tags: BCCL, Churumuri, Dainik Bhaskar, Dainik Jagran, DNA, India Today, NDTV, Prannoy Roy, Radhika Roy, Raghav Bahl, Rajeev Chandrasekhar, Ramesh Agarwal, Ronie Screwvala, Samir Jain, Sans Serif, Subhash Chandra, Sun, The Times of India Group, TV18, UTV, Vineet Jain, Zee
    A columnist more ‘powerful’ than all media pros
    31 January 2010

    There are 12 media professionals—proprietors, promoters, publishers, editors—in the Indian Express list of the 100 most powerful Indians in 2010, but an irregular columnist is listed to be more powerful than all of them.

    The quirky list, which makes no mention of the methodology or the jury, has two newcomers from the 2009 list—columnist Arun Shourie and TV anchor Barkha Dutt—and shows the door to three others.

    Like last year, the IE list chronicles the kinks of the boldfaced names. And like year, Express has diligently kept editor-in-chief Shekhar Gupta‘s name out of the reckoning.

    ***

    # No. 38: Arun Shourie, journalist turned politician: “He asks all visitors to his library to take off their shoes before they enter.” (new entry)

    # No. 53: Sameer Jain and Vineet Jain, chairman and managing director, Bennett, Coleman & Co Ltd: “Sameer’s daughter and son-in-law are being groomed to take leadership positions.”

    # No. 70: N.Ram, editor-in-chief, The Hindu: “He is very fond of western classical music.”

    # No. 72: Kalanidhi Maran and Dayanidhi Maran, Sun network: “Daya never misses his evening walk; Kalanidhi owns a Lamborghini.”

    # No. 73: Raghav Bahl, founder Network 18: “The TV veteran is terribly camera-shy.”

    # No. 76: Shobhana Bhartia, Hindustan Times: “Owns one of the finest sari collections among women entrepreneurs.”

    # No. 77: M.M. Gupta and Sanjay Gupta, Dainik Jagran: “Sanjay is a fitness freak, uncle sets agenda at work.”

    # No. 79: Aveek Sarkar, editor-in-chief, Ananda Bazaar Patrika Group: “He is in the business of news but doesn’t like to speak to the media.”

    # No. 82: Barkha Dutt, group editor, NDTV: “A blogger who slammed her 26/11 coverage had to say sorry.” (new entry)

    ***

    # Out from the 2009 list: Prannoy Roy, founder, NDTV (No. 61) ; Prabhu Chawla, editor, India Today (No. 71); Ramesh Chandra Agarwal, chairman, Daink Bhaskar (No. 88)

    Also read: 26% of India’s most powerful are media barons

    The 11 habits of India’s most powerful media pros

    Arun Shourie: ‘Intolerant. Abusive. Dictatorial.’

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    Posted in A bit of fun, Magazines, Newspapers, People, Radio, Television | 2 Comments »
    Tags: Arun Shourie, Aveek Sarkar, Barkha Dutt, Churumuri, Daink Jagran, Dayanidhi Maran, Hindustan Times, Indian Express, Kalanidhi Maran, N. Ram, Prabhu Chawla, Prannoy Roy, Raghav Bahl, Ramesh Chandra Agarwal, Sameer Jain, Sans Serif, Shekhar Gupta, Shobhana Bhartia, Sun, The Hindu, The Times of India, Trishla Jain, Vineet Jain
    A house for Mr & Mrs Roy for Rs 270,000,000
    25 October 2009

    prannoy-enews

    From The Insider column in the Indian edition of Forbes:

    “We hear that that grand old titan [of Indian steel], Russi Mody, is selling his two-storied bungalow on Calcutta’s tony Belvedere Road. Apparently he has a lifetime interest in the property, and it will change hands only after he passes on.

    “One of our avian friends tells us that the Roys of NDTV are close to finalising a deal, for around Rs 27 crore.

    “Prannoy Roy doesn’t have much of a connection with the City aside from his Bengaliness, but Radhika Roy grew up there. Perhaps that will be their retirement home? Not that we’re expecting them to be putting up their feet anytime soon. After all Mr. Mody, despite the legendary 16-egg breakfasts, is in robust health. Prannoyda, we’re sure you’ll join us in wishing you a long wait!”

    For the record, Forbes India is published by Raghav Bahl‘s Network 18 which competes with NDTV’s news, business and lifestyle channels.

    Photograph: courtesy Queen Mary University of London

    Also read: 26% of India’s most powerful are media barons

    The 11 habits of India’s most powerful media pros

    ‘The endgame is near for both NDTV and TV18′

    An ‘A List’ most A-listers don’t want to be a part of

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    Posted in A bit of fun, Magazines, People, Television | Leave a Comment »
    Tags: Churumuri, Forbes, NDTV, Network 18, Prannoy Roy, Radhika Roy, Russi Mody, Sans Serif, TV18
    ‘A List’ most A-listers don’t want to be a part of
    19 September 2009

    The Indian edition of Campaign has brought out a booklet called “The A List”, supposedly the who’s who in media, marketing and advertising, in partnership with NDTV Media.

    And the sloppy, incomplete and typo-ridden effort is remarkable for how predictable and boring most A-listers are: the most-admired politician—surprise, surprise—is Mahatma Gandhi, almost everybody’s favourite device is the Blackberry™, etcetera.

    Still there are a few trends to be spotted:

    # Most owners have a marked inclination not to reveal more of themselves. The Times of India‘s Samir and Vineet Jain; Dainik Bhaskar‘s Sudhir Agarwal; India Today‘s Aroon Purie; Network 18′s Raghav Bahl; NDTV’s Prannoy and Radhika Roy; Sun TV’s Kalanidhi Maran; India TV’s Rajat Sharma; Hindustan Times‘ Shobhana Bharatiya et al haven’t bothered to fill up the form.

    # The list is so Bombay-Delhi centric that it would seem that the South and East of India are in some other country. Result: India’s biggest publications like Malayala Manorama, Ananda Bazar Patrika, Eenadu, Dina Thanthi, have no representation in a 100-rupee booklet that claims to represent “our entire ecosystem” (editor Anant Rangaswami‘s description).

    # The new media goes almost completely unrepresented but for the presence of blogger Amit Varma, and many (Mid-Day‘s Tarique Ansari, NDTV’s Raj Nayak) admit they are technologically challenged.

    # In a list teeming with people born in small-town India (Meerut, Madurai, Rohtak, Ratlam, Dhanbad, Kanpur, Karur, Manipal, Varanasi), many were born elsewhere: Business India founder Ashok Advani born in Hyderabad (Sindh); Outlook editor-in-chief Vinod Mehta, Rawalpindi; India Today proprietor Aroon Purie, Lahore, and COO Mala Sekhri, London; CNBC’s Senthil Chengalvarayan, Kandy, Sri Lanka; A.P. Parigi, ex-Radio Mirchi head, Colombo; Vaishnavi Communications’ Neera Radia, Kenya; INX chief Peter Mukherjea, London.

    Also read: 26% of India’s powerful are media barons

    The 11 habits of India’s most powerful media pros

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    Posted in People, A bit of fun, Television, Newspapers, Magazines, Radio | Leave a Comment »
    Tags: Aroon Purie, India Today, Vinod Mehta, NDTV, The Times of India, Churumuri, Hindustan Times, Sans Serif, Raghav Bahl, India TV, Rajat Sharma, Prannoy Roy, Samir Jain, Vineet Jain, Network 18, Amit Varma, Ananda Bazaar Patrika, Sun TV, Eenadu, Radhika Roy, BCCL, Kalanidhi Maran, Malayala Manorama, Shobhana Bharatiya, Campaign India, Anant Rangaswami, Dina Thanthi, Tarique Ansari, Raj Nayak, Ashok Advani, Senthil Chengalvarayan, Peter Mukherjea, Neera Radia
    ‘The endgame is near for both TV 18 and NDTV’
    31 July 2009

    SHARANYA KANVILKAR writes from Bombay: Indian media houses, generally speaking, have been cagey in reporting the economic downturn and what it is doing to the man (and woman) on the street. They haven’t ignored it, of course, but they have been, let’s say, less boisterous than they were when reporting the boom.

    At one level, this is because of the widely held belief that gloom doesn’t sell. “Let us report what is happening, but let us not amplify it too much,” one top Hindi publisher wrote in an email to several co-publishers a few months ago. At another level, this is because of the belief that the blip was temporary and the good times would soon be back.

    The good times may soon be here, so help me god, but will they be for India’s most glamourous television houses?

    Moneylife, the personal financial magazine run by India’s pioneering business investigative journalist Sucheta Dalal and her husband Debashis Basu, has a special report on the state of of TV18, the BSE-listed company of Raghav Bahl (in picture), which runs CNBC-TV18 and the Hindi business channel CNBC Awaaz, among other businesses.

    It is nothing short of eye-popping.

    “Bleeding to Death?” reads the headline.

    The story, authored by Debashis Basu, talks of the “horrifying story of cyclical revenues and non-cyclical costs,” and it warns that “things may only get worse”.

    It compares TV 18′s current plight with NDTV’s.

    “Both are losing profusely. Losses were a little lower when the [Indian] economy grew by 9% and the market euphoria fetched the two groups newer dumb investors and more money to keep going. But now, both are nearing this endgame.”

    In broadcasting (CNBC TV18 and CNBC Awaaz), Basu writes that revenues are down and profits have collapsed due to higher costs. In web (moneycontrol.com, in.com, etc) revnues of Rs 65 crore have been overtaken by losses of Rs 66 crore. The newswire and printing businesses are not doing too well either.

    Basu writes that TV18′s financial situation today is the result of accumulated sins of the past couple of years: the expansion of web-based businesses with no profitability in sight, huge expenses on staff and stock options, to finance which the company stares at a mountain of debt close to Rs 850 crore.

    Even with the stock markets clawing back, Basu concludes that “the problems of TV18 have just started” because the economics of the business has changed with the entry of new players like ET Now, and with rumours of heightened competition in the form of Bloomberg.

    “The big issue for TV18 is exactly what hit NDTV a few quarters earlier: how to keep funding the losses? One way out is taking on more debt hoping that the businesses would reviee…. Or get foreign media companies to buy your story….

    “Even if there is value in some parts of the group, Raghav Bahl has locked up that value in a complicated group structure that got created when he funded these businesses as a network of entities, not independent businesses. So squeezed between competition on one side and cash crunch on the other, the endgame for TV18 begins.”

    IBN18, which runs CNN-IBN, IBN Lokmat, IBN7, have always been losing money.

    Read the full TV18 article: Bleeding to death?

    Read the full NDTV article: Reality show

    Also read: How the Indian media dream went sour

    Is this man the new media mogul of India?

    26% of India’s most powerful are media barons

    The 11 habits of India’s most powerful media pros

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    Posted in Issues and Ideas, Magazines, Newspapers, People, Television | 3 Comments »
    Tags: Ashutosh Gupta, BCCL, Bennett Coleman & Co Ltd, Churumuri, CNBC TV-18, CNBC-Awaaz, CNN-IBN, Debashis Basu, ET Now, IBN Lokmat, IBN7, in.com, moneycontrol.com, MoneyLife, NDTV, Nikhil Wagle, Prannoy Roy, Raghav Bahl, Rajdeep Sardesai, Sans Serif, Sucheta Dalal, The Times of India, TV18
    It happened one night on the day of the eclipse
    22 July 2009

    250px-Arnab-new roy

    PRITAM SENGUPTA writes from New Delhi: Chalk and cheese can never taste the same. Bill O’Reilly can never be confused for Walter Cronkite. But, on the night of the longest solar eclipse in the 21st century, probably because of it, something close happened on Indian TV.

    Prannoy Roy (right), the calm and cultivated voice of assurance of India’s original private broadcaster New Delhi Television (NDTV), was confused by a talking head for Arnab Goswami, the shrieking, shouting, hectoring, haranguing face of its competitor, Times Now.

    Not on a rival channel but on Roy’s own NDTV, the channel where Goswami cut his television teeth before jumping ship to launch the news channel for The Times of India group as its “Howard Beale“.

    On “India Decides @ 9″, NDTV’s primetime show which now sees Roy making an increasing number of appearances, possibly to counter Goswami’s 9 pm appearance on the Newshour, the BJP spokesman Ravi Shankar Prasad was asked a question on the topic of the day: the government’s alleged capitulation to the United States on the nuclear deal.

    Little realising which channel he was on, Prasad proceeded to deliver his setpiece answer:

    “Let me tell you, Arnab Goswami….”

    “Arnab Goswami?” Roy tried to intervene.

    But Prasad went on merrily as Roy, 60, buried his face on screen. After Prasad finished, Roy said it was in the fitness of things that he read out his bio-data—that he was Prannoy Roy, not Arnab Goswami.

    When Prasad tried to apologise for the goof-up, Roy was graciousness personified.

    “It’s OK if you call me Arnab Goswami. He’s part of the NDTV family. He’s one of us. He was born and brought up here.”

    The confusion was probably caused because the Outdoor Broadcasting (OB) vans of different channels line up before the offices and residences of the spokesmen of the various political parties, who appear on different stations one after the other, with barely enough time to catch their breath.

    Doubtless, Ravi Shankar Prasad was on Times Now immediately after his NDTV appearance, where, mercifully, he did not confuse Arnab Goswami for his bete noire Rajdeep Sardesai, who co-hosts “India at Nine”. Sardesai, like Goswami, left Roy’s NDTV to launch CNN-IBN.

    Roy can only hope that, like the solar eclipse, this eclipse will only last a short while, and that not many may have seen it due to the inclement weather.



    Posted in A bit of fun, People, Television | 1 Comment »
    Tags: Arnab Goswami, Bill O' Reilly, BJP, Churumuri, CNN-IBN, Howard Beale, NDTV, OB, Prannoy Roy, Rajdeep Sardesai, Sans Serif, Times Now, Walter Cronkite
    When only one side of the conversation is “live”
    8 July 2009

    06072009659

    “Breaking News” lost its meaning on Indian television a long time ago. Now, the meaning “Live” is in danger, too.

    It is not uncommon to find the same talking heads on different TV stations holding forth on the same topic at the same time on the same day.

    But an even more questionable “live” procedure is now gaining currency. Recorded interviews are patched into studio discussions to make it seem “live”. Prannoy Roy‘s NDTV did plenty of it during the election campaign.

    On budget day, July 6, Arnab Goswami of Times Now took it a step further, talking “live” to the deputy chairman of the planning commission, Montek Singh Ahluwalia (in picture), who clearly seemed to be in some July 4 party, with American flags hanging behind him.

    https://wearethebest.wordpress.com/tag/prannoy-roy/
     
  4. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    I am quoting some earlier discussion from a different thread to give a start-up:









     
  5. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    The thread is static!

    Therefore, what is the answer?

     
  6. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    More out here to savour!

     
  7. mayfair

    mayfair Elite Member Elite Member

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  8. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Mayfair, first of all, many thanks to you for participating in this thread.

    I would like to quote you from another thread:

    Yes, you do have a genuine reason to question N Ram due to his political past (perhaps he still thinks that way?). Yes, it is very much possible that The Hindu, Frontline, Business Line and all that belong to The Hindu family could be biased in favour of left.

    I would request you to visit the links below:
    http://www.hinduonnet.com/2008/07/11/stories/2008071155631000.htm
    http://www.thehindubusinessline.in/mentor/2007/08/27/stories/2007082750221200.htm

    Kindly read the comments that The Hindu has published.

    Let me know if you see that:
    • some comments are pro-left
    • some comments are anti-left
    • some comments are neutral

    This is just my humble opinion, that any media, that allows diametrically opposite views, must be given due credit for maintaining credibility and journalistic neutrality.

    Looking forward to your response.
     
  9. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    PMaitra,

    Are you suggesting that the HINDU is fickle as the wind?

    Could be!
     
  10. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    I am posting this since we are talking about the media.

    I had read it before too.

    I have no personal knowledge.

    Except that Roy is the brother in law of Brinda.

    If true, quite an old boys club!

    Though it is no crime to be related or know each other or be associates, or is it?
     
    TrueSpirit1 likes this.
  11. thakur_ritesh

    thakur_ritesh Administrator Administrator

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    sorry havent had the time to go through those links or this discussion as a whole but incase those links up there are suggesting to a neutral stand on part of hindu and associates then that not be taken as a rule but more of a case of exception, they ofcourse have to show they are not biased in favor or against any.

    even a ndtv does an odd good coverage on narendra modi but that doesnt say much, they also at times take on the policies initiated by the central government led by the congress but again that is not what the channel really intends to do. same with times now where they do take on bjp at times but a rarity to be seen.
     
  12. mayfair

    mayfair Elite Member Elite Member

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    Thanks for your kind words pmaitra. I referred to N Ram's ideological affiliations to highlight the fact that it's not very difficult to grasp the motivation behind the ideological positions reflected in the various news media offerings. As pointed out, Chandan Mitra is a BJP MP and his writings reflect a right wing inclination, N Ram is an avowed atheist and a leftist, which is reflected in his offerings and that of The Hindu group of publications. Pankaj Vohra of Hindustan times is a unabashed Congress-supporter and so is Vinod Mehta of Outlook. Similarly, Barkha Dutt being awarded the Padma Shri during the UPA-I regime was not surprising given her ardent support to the Congress viewpoint in her media presentations. Swapan Dasgupta has been fairly right of centre in his writings. In summary, most journalists out there have undisguised ideological and/or political leanings, which is reflected in bulk of their contributions.

    However, this does not imply that they do not differ in perception from their political/ideological affiliates. Each one of these media personalities have from time to time expressed views which differ or disagree with those of their ideological affiliates. It's not unique to The Hindu- Outlook and Hindustan Times have published writings critical of Congress (though never the "Royal family"). Chandan Mitra and Swapan Dasgupta and even Arun Shourie have often spoken out against BJP and RSS perspective on several issues. This may be a genuine difference of opinion or may just be a fig leaf to maintain an illusion of "independence" and "neutrality". However, it'll naive to believe that the ideological sympathies have been diluted. White liquid in a milk bottle is milk..may not be completely full, but it's there. Or as it is often said- if it walks like a duck, quacks like a duck and swims like a duck...
     
  13. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Excellent post Mayfair.

    After all, every journalist is a human being at the end of the day and subject to his or her own subconscious political conscience.

    I guess this is the charm of multi-party democracy. All the finger pointing, name calling, mud slinging notwithstanding, this eclectic mix of opinions and ideologies force us to think. What can be a better way to cultivate our minds other than debating?

    So, deviating slightly from this topic but sticking to this thread, what do you think of Arnab Goswami of Times Now? I feel he is an interesting personality.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2011
  14. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Arnab Goswami is an evangelist journalist.

    He is sincere, but at times, he pushes the envelope too hard.
     
  15. nitesh

    nitesh Mob Control Manager Stars and Ambassadors

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    I suggest if we can get hold of ACTUAL shareholding pattern of different media houses, which is quite a difficult task (mind it I said ACTUAL) we can get there tilt correctly.

    If we feel that it is tough job (which it is) we can start tracking individual channel/journalist coverage on important topics like what part was being shown, how the commentaries where made to tilt the opinion. This can give a fair idea about what there agenda is.
     
  16. JBH22

    JBH22 Senior Member Senior Member

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    The objective of a journalist AFAIK is to give an objective perspective of what is happening i.e conveying the news after that its for the public to form an opinion on the news of what he/she gets the very fact that a journalist takes sides or has soft corner for any reason is his/her failure imho.

    As to journalist like Barkha Dutt or Goswami its not their political conscience that speaks at the end of the day but rather they act like the spokesperson of a particular party which i found completely ridicule. (the Nira Radia tape is one example)
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2011
  17. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Good point.

    However, I would beg to differ on Arnab Goswami. I think he does not hesitate to badger anyone from any party.

    Yes, that is one heck of a tough job but once we know where the strings lead to, we can tell better.

    That is the reason I said that any news-channel/paper worth its salt will publish articles, editorials, opinions and readers' comments that are from different perspectives. It is only then that a news-channel/paper can be called fair.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2011
  18. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    There is no such thing as "balanced news" and it doesn't exist in India or anywhere else in the world.

    The mainstream media is specially not balanced and various media houses have agendas or political bias one way or another. No sane intelligent person would solely act or form opinions on the basis of what he sees on mainstream media...only ignorant, naive, sheep and in general idiots do that.

    Only way to get balanced news is the internet where one can read/see both sides of the story and then come to a conclusion. Another way is to have discussions with person having different opinion and in tv more often than not we dont get to see a good debate because everyone screams at everyone all the time and as a result the audience cant make out anything and also the allotted time is nearly not sufficient.
     
  19. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Any particular news article may not be balanced, but any newspaper that publishes readers' letters to the editor and if pro-article as well as anti-article letters are published, then that newspaper can be called fair.
     
  20. The Messiah

    The Messiah Bow Before Me! Elite Member

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    True but what guarantee is there that media person (with bias) will publish the best letters for both pro and against. He can post an exceptionally written letter by some reader that matches his viewpoint and publish a poorly thought out letter by another that is against his views.

    Im skeptical of everything and everyone by nature so dont mind me :noidea:. If someone is feeding me information then i automatically assume he is upto no good. I like to research information myself and read both arguments....its one of the reasons i joined this forum.

    In answer to your question yes the newspaper can be labeled as "fair" if it prints the best arguments for both pro and against debate without itself nudging the reader towards either side.
     
  21. pmaitra

    pmaitra Moderator Moderator

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    Oh no, not at all. In fact, I have this habit of challenging each and everything. I am in research profession, so it is a requirement, not an option, to challenge each and everything to a point where the other person literally wants to stab you. :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2011

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