Japanese military resurgence to Counter a Rising China

Discussion in 'Indo Pacific & East Asia' started by LETHALFORCE, Nov 30, 2012.

  1. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Japan Is Flexing Its Military Muscle to Counter a Rising China - Asia Business News - CNBC - CNBC

    After years of watching its international influence eroded by a slow-motion economic decline, the pacifist nation of Japan is trying to raise its profile in a new way, offering military aid for the first time in decades and displaying its own armed forces in an effort to build regional alliances and shore up other countries’ defenses to counter a rising China.

    A Japan Coast Guard vessel sprays water against Taiwanese fishing boats, in the East China Sea near the Senkaku islands as known in Japanese or Diaoyu Islands in Chinese on September 25, 2012.

    Already this year, Japan crossed a little-noted threshold by providing its first military aid abroad since the end of World War II, approving a $2 million package for its military engineers to train troops in Cambodia and East Timor in disaster relief and skills like road building. Japanese warships have not only conducted joint exercises with a growing number of military forces in the Pacific and Asia, but they have also begun making regular port visits to countries long fearful of a resurgence of Japan’s military.

    And after stepping up civilian aid programs to train and equip the coast guards of other nations, Japanese defense officials and analysts say, Japan could soon reach another milestone: beginning sales in the region of military hardware like seaplanes, and perhaps eventually the stealthy diesel-powered submarines considered well suited to the shallow waters where China is making increasingly assertive territorial claims.

    Taken together those steps, while modest, represent a significant shift for Japan, which had resisted repeated calls from the United States to become a true regional power for fear that doing so would move it too far from its postwar pacifism. The country’s quiet resolve to edge past that reluctance and become more of a player comes as the United States and China are staking their own claims to power in Asia, and as jitters over China’s ambitions appear to be softening bitterness toward Japan among some Southeast Asian countries trampled last century in its quest for colonial domination.

    The driver for Japan’s shifting national security strategy is its tense dispute with China over uninhabited islands in the East China Sea that is feeding Japanese anxiety that the country’s relative decline — and the financial struggles of its traditional protector, the United States — are leaving Japan increasingly vulnerable.

    “During the cold war, all Japan had to do was follow the U.S.,” said Keiro Kitagami, a special adviser on security issues to Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda. “With China, it’s different. Japan has to take a stand on its own.”

    Japan’s moves do not mean it might transform its military, which serves a purely defensive role, into an offensive force anytime soon. The public has resisted past efforts by some politicians to revamp Japan’s pacifist constitution, and the nation’s vast debt will limit how much military aid it can extend.

    But it is also clear that attitudes in Japan are evolving as China continues its double-digit annual growth in military spending and asserts that it should be in charge of the islands that Japan claims, as well as vast swaths of the South China Sea that various Southeast Asian nations say are in their control.

    Japanese leaders have met the Chinese challenge over the islands known as the Senkaku in Japan and the Diaoyu in China with an uncharacteristic willingness to push back, and polls show the public increasingly agrees. Both major political parties are also talking openly about instituting a more flexible reading of the constitution that would allow Japan to come to the defense of allies — shooting down any North Korean missile headed for the United States, for instance — blurring the line between an offensive and defensive force.

    The country’s self-defense forces had already begun nosing over that line in Iraq and Afghanistan, where Japan backed the United States-led campaigns by deploying naval tankers to refuel warships in the Indian Ocean.

    Japanese officials say their strategy is not to begin a race for influence with China, but to build up ties with other nations that share worries about their imposing neighbor. They acknowledge that even building the capacity of other nations’ coast guards is a way of strengthening those countries’ ability to stand up to any Chinese threat.

    “We want to build our own coalition of the willing in Asia to prevent China from just running over us,” said Yoshihide Soeya, director of the Institute of East Asian Studies at Keio University in Tokyo.

    Or, as the vice minister of defense, Akihisa Nagashima, said in an interview, “We cannot just allow Japan to go into quiet decline.”

    The United States has generally welcomed such efforts by Japan, which are in line with its own strategy of building up Asian nations militarily so they can stand their ground against China, as well as expanding an American military presence in the region.

    China, which itself suffered mightily in imperial Japan’s 20th-century territorial grabs, has reacted with warnings that Japan is trying to overturn the outcome of World War II by staging a military comeback. At a defense conference in Australia last month, Lt. Gen. Ren Haiquan of China warned his hosts against allying more closely with what he called a fascist nation that once bombed the Australian city of Darwin.

    In a measure of the geopolitical changes roiling the region, however, concerns about any resurgent Japanese militarism appear to be fading in some countries embroiled in their own territorial disputes with China, like Vietnam and the Philippines, the scene of fierce fighting during the war.

    Analysts there and elsewhere in the region said their countries welcomed, and sometimes invited, Japan’s help. “We have already put aside our nightmares of World War II because of the threat posed by China,” said Rommel Banlaoi, a security expert at the Philippine Institute for Peace, Violence and Terrorism Research in Manila.

    On a recent morning, 22 coast guard officials from a dozen Asian and African nations joined a training cruise around Tokyo Bay aboard a sleek, white Japanese Coast Guard cutter. The visitors snapped photos of the engine room, the electronics-studded bridge and the 20-millimeter cannon. Before the cutter left port, the foreign contingent and the Japanese crew stood at attention on deck facing each other, then bowed deeply.

    “Japan is joining the United States and Australia in helping us face China,” said Mark Lim, an administrative officer from the Philippine Coast Guard who joined the cruise.

    Japan is widely viewed as being the only nation in the region with a navy powerful enough to check China.

    Although Japan’s military spending has been shrinking, the military budget is, by many measures, the sixth largest in the world. In keeping with its pacifist stance, Japan has none of the long-range missiles, nuclear submarines or large aircraft carriers necessary for projecting real power. But its diesel-powered subs are considered the best of their type in the world. The Japanese Navy also has sophisticated Aegis-equipped cruisers capable of shooting down ballistic missiles, and two large helicopter-carrying destroyers that could be retrofitted to carry fighter jets that can take off vertically.

    The Japanese Navy took a big step toward opening up in 2009 by holding a joint military drill with Australia — its first such exercise with a nation besides the United States. It has since joined a number of multinational naval drills in Southeast Asia, and in June held its first joint maneuver with India.

    Analysts and former officials say Japan’s military has so far been careful to offer assistance in noncombat-related areas like disaster relief, antipiracy and health care. But even these limited steps build ties between military forces. One plan now under negotiation is to train medical personnel from Vietnam’s navy next year to care for the crews on that nation’s newly purchased Russian-built submarines.

    “Our strategy is to offer hardware and training to create mini-Japanese coast guards and mini-Japanese Self-Defense Forces around the South China Sea,” said Tetsuo Kotani, a researcher at the Japan Institute of International Affairs in Tokyo.

    Under the decade-old civilian aid program to build up regional coast guards, Japanese officials say they are in the final stages of what would be their biggest security-related aid package yet — to provide the Philippine Coast Guard with 10 cutters worth about $12 million each. Ministry officials say they may offer similar ships to Vietnam.

    Japan’s Ministry of Defense said it planned to double its military aid program next year to help Indonesia and Vietnam. Vietnam could also be among the countries that Japan would allow to buy its submarines, according to a former defense minister, Toshimi Kitazawa, who named Australia and Malaysia as other possible buyers.

    “Japan has been insensitive to the security needs of its regional neighbors,” Mr. Kitazawa said in a recent interview. “We can offer much to increase their peace of mind.”

    This story originally appeared in The New York Times
     
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  3. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  4. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    The Japanese are equally sharp cookies as the Chinese.

    And they are more fierce and more ultra nationalist.

    They are also intelligent and make their own products which can be world beaters as was the Zero in WW II that shook the world!
     
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  5. W.G.Ewald

    W.G.Ewald Defence Professionals/ DFI member of 2 Defence Professionals

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    Japanese did terrible things in China which will never be forgotten.
     
  6. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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  7. roma

    roma NRI in Europe Senior Member

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    all true ! but what wasnt written is that they also severely lacked the MASS necessary to fight a large nation ( which was the usa in the 1940's ) ...look at any documentary on WW2 and you will see that while the japs had the quality for sure and also the determination and bravery all that was eclipsed by their severe lack of NUMBERS ... the phrase quantity is the new quality wasnt formulated for no reason ....

    just this evening i saw on television the women's judo finals in japans budokan stadium ..... the fierceness of the japanese ladies was unequaled

    BUT INDIA WILL HAVE to hit home to japan that all their wonderful imperial qualities will amount to ONE BIG FAILURE without the numbers ....indeed as happened in WW2

    join with us ( usa - india - australia ) - or go for a second round of impressive failure
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2012
  8. jalsa

    jalsa Regular Member

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    China will regret their actions, its better for them when Japan is sleeping and as many would have thought japanese aren't pacifist.
     
  9. no smoking

    no smoking Senior Member Senior Member

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    Ok, bring them up, Chinese will be waiting here.
     
  10. arya

    arya Senior Member Senior Member

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    now the word game should be over either some action or pls stop barking
     
  11. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    Japan sleeping? You must be kidding me.

    I may not like Japanese, but Japanese have always been ambitious people. They are just like a beast in a cage, sooner or later, they will shatter the shackle imposed on them by Allies to be what they really are.

    Japanese ultimate goal is the whole world as it was demonstrated in WW2, people as dedicated and persistent as Japanese, I don't think they will give up their ultimate dream.

    It is just a matter of time for a WW3 to break out, I think it is wise for China to beef up its military strength before it is too late to regret.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2012
  12. Oblaks

    Oblaks Regular Member

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    Things have changed, the aggressors of ww2 have learned their lessons and wants to live in peace. China like the rest of her friends in the middle east and nokor never gets tired of war. China is out for vengeance because of their years of shame. If ww3 happens.. definitely china will be the aggressor.
     
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  13. jalsa

    jalsa Regular Member

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    Japan learnt its lesson the hard way in WW2, they don't want to repeat that and thats why they adopted pacifist constitution. They started beefing up their military only recenty that too due to the fear of chinese, it is upto you to decide if you wanted to see another imperial Japan and beleive me, when you do that you will regret it for sure.
     
  14. ice berg

    ice berg Senior Member Senior Member

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    Before more people wet themselves because of a possible remilitarized Japan, they need to take a long and good look at their economy.

    Some of his decisions confound those in Mr Noda’s own party, who have seen his government’s support rate plunge to 18%, according to the latest poll. They also fear holding an election during what may be the start of Japan’s third economic recession in five years. On November 12th it was reported that GDP in the third quarter declined 0.9% compared with the previous three months. Fourth-quarter data augur ill, too

    Brought to you by Politics in Japan: The "Kamikaze" election | The Economist

    The sinews of war are infinite money-Marcus Tullius Cicero
     
  15. nimo_cn

    nimo_cn Senior Member Senior Member

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    Japanese military strength pioneered in Asia long before China starts building up its own.

    And Japanese never wanted to adopt that pacifist constitution, they were having one only because the Allies forced them. Not a single moment has gone without Japanese attempting to discard the pacifist constitution.

    And as i pointed out in my last post, Japanese are dedicated and persistent people, gradually and slowly they are succeeding in relieving themselves from the last rope. Now they are pursuing nuclear bomb, and i believe they will get it.

    Sent from Huawei Ascend T8830
     
  16. Zero_Wing

    Zero_Wing Regular Member

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    Whatever you you people always lie about things why should i believe this? hell why would the rest of the world believe you people!? If you people can't break away from your past that's your thing but your actions now is the problem here not the past. this for all the Chinese Forumers here !
     
  17. Ray

    Ray The Chairman Defence Professionals Moderator

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    Japan rises!

    [​IMG]

    Doesn't look good for China!

    Nanking and all that!
     
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  18. ice berg

    ice berg Senior Member Senior Member

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    Thanks for pointing out the japanese atrocities during the ww2. There are still hope for humankind. :namaste:

    [​IMG]

    Japanese soldiers shooting blindfolded Sikh prisoners. The photograph was found among Japanese records when British troops entered Singapore.

    [​IMG]
    Nanking Massacre victims
     
  19. civfanatic

    civfanatic Retired Moderator

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    At the back of their mind, American planners don't want to see a resurgent Japan anymore than the Chinese do. They know what happened last time.

    At best, Japan will be used like a guard dog by the Americans. If the dog gets too aggressive, America can always pull back on the leash. But they will never accept removing the leash entirely.
     
  20. roma

    roma NRI in Europe Senior Member

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    this might be a different scenario ..................they might let the guard dog run wild a bit more than before
     
  21. amoy

    amoy Senior Member Senior Member

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    Let's see the vision of Ishihara San - the top gun these days, back in 1989:yo:

    The Japan That Can Say No - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
     

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