Japan visa to Uygur leader Kadeer sparks China furor

Discussion in 'Politics & Society' started by Quickgun Murugan, Oct 21, 2009.

  1. Quickgun Murugan

    Quickgun Murugan Regular Member

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    Japan visa to Uygur leader Kadeer sparks China furor

    http://english.people.com.cn/90001/90776/90883/6789021.html

    China strongly condemns Japan's issuing of a visa to Uygur separatist Rebiya Kadeer, the Foreign Ministry said yesterday.

    "We have exchanged views with the Japan side on the issue and we express strong dissatisfaction that Japan has granted Kadeer the entry to facilitate her separatism activities despite China's severe objection," Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu told reporters at a regular news briefing yesterday.

    "Any separatism scheme to split China will not result in anything," Ma said.

    Kadeer was expected in Japan yesterday and intended to stay through early November, after the government of Japanese Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama issued her a visa on Monday, Kyodo News reported yesterday.

    The alleged mastermind behind the July 5 riots in Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region, during which at least 197 people were killed and more than 1,700 were injured, was allowed entry into Japan with a visa granted by Taro Aso's government in July, which was also protested by China.

    Kadeer's second visa-granting this week, by Hatoyama's government just days after his goodwill trip to China, is likely to raise another wave of protest from Beijing.

    Chinese observers believe the visa decision will interrupt the refining of Sino-Japan relations.

    Lu Yaodong, a Japanese studies scholar with the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, said the new Japanese government's visa issuance to Kadeer is "going against the basics" of the Sino-Japan strategic relationship.

    "Japan's new government led by Hatoyama has vowed to develop a more stable and healthier relationship with China but it is actually doing things obstructive and contradictory to the goal," Lu said.

    He considered the Japanese action "unfavorable", even though Hatoyama's visit to China and his determination to forge better relationships with its neighbors has given the Chinese people confidence of a closer bond between the two neighbors.

    Yuan Mindao, deputy secretary-general of the Sino-Japanese Friendship Association, said Japan's offence is "unwise" when Japan is wooing China's cooperation to push ties forward and to work together against the financial crisis. The decision is also likely to anger the Chinese public, he said.

    On Monday, the leader of Japan's opposition Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) Sadakazu Tanigaki paid a visit to the controversial Yasukuni war shrine that also enshrines many class-A World War II criminals, raising another protest from China.

    Yesterday, more than 50 Japanese politicians visited a controversial war shrine in Tokyo, but Hatoyama and his Cabinet stayed away, as the new prime minister had pledged during the election campaign.
     
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  3. LETHALFORCE

    LETHALFORCE Moderator Moderator

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    Interesting how the Japanese are all of a sudden giving attention to the islamic separatists in China meanwhile they are not helping their Buddhist Tibetan brothers in China occupied Tibet.
     
  4. Koji

    Koji New Member

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    Zen Buddhism in Japan is a distinct version of the Buddhism seen in Tibet. Comparisons can me made with Protestants and Catholics. It's essentially two very different cultures and neither relate to each other.

    It will be interesting to see how our new government responds to China's anger over the matter. My guess is that Japan will yield somewhat to prevent a buildup of tension. After all, it was we who proposed the East-Asian bloc.
     
  5. Daredevil

    Daredevil On Vacation! Administrator

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    Evidently, China has problem with everybody and everything under the sun. It has problem with Dalai Lama, Kadeer, Indian PM and what not. Time for china to shut up and mind its own business.
     
  6. Quickgun Murugan

    Quickgun Murugan Regular Member

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    Uighur leader urges Japan to press China on rights - inSing.com



    Exiled Uighur leader Rebiya Kadeer, alleging that China has "destroyed" her Muslim people, is urging Japan's new government not to ignore their plight as it presses to bolster ties with Beijing.


    Kadeer was speaking during a visit to Japan, where Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama's centre-left government took power five weeks ago vowing to improve regional ties and to promote an EU-style Asian community.

    US-based Kadeer, whom China labels a separatist, arrived Tuesday for a 10-day visit, her second trip to Japan this year, triggering an immediate protest from China against Japan for allowing her entry.

    Speaking with AFP late Tuesday, Kadeer criticised China for rights abuses but said she was ready to talk with Beijing on improving ethnic minority policies as she seeks "self-determination" for her people.

    "I hope Japan will talk with the Chinese government about the problem," added the grandmother and mother-of-11.

    "Japan plays a very important role in Asia. So it's a responsibility of Japan to talk about the Uighurs' problems."

    Uighurs, a Turkic-speaking Central Asian people, have accused China of decades of religious, cultural and political oppression.


    During her previous visit to Japan, in July, Kadeer said 10,000 Uighurs had "disappeared" after unrest that erupted on July 5 in the Xinjiang capital Urumqi, pitting Uighurs against members of China's dominant Han group.

    Kadeer said Tuesday that "according to new information we have obtained, from July 5 to October 1 more than 10,000 Uighurs have been arrested and jailed, but how many have died, or been killed, how many have been jailed, nobody knows the exact number."

    China blames Kadeer for fomenting the unrest, which it says left 197 people dead and more than 1,600 injured, mostly Han.

    Uighurs say the unrest was triggered when police cracked down on peaceful protests over a June brawl at a factory in southern China that state media said left two members of the minority group dead.

    China last week sentenced to death 12 people over the bloody unrest.

    Kadeer said she had learnt that "out of the 11 Uighurs who were sentenced to death... nine people have been executed.

    "Punishing people who demonstrated peacefully is not necessary," she said, speaking though an interpreter.

    However, Kadeer's pleas to Japan for help run counter to Hatoyama's declared aim to erase the distrust and frequent animosity that marked Tokyo's relations with Beijing under previous conservative governments.

    His Foreign Minister Katsuya Okada recently said no cabinet members planned to meet Kadeer during her visit.

    China's foreign ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu on Tuesday expressed "strong dissatisfaction" about Japan granting Kadeer a visa.

    "We want to reiterate that China is firmly against national separatism and is firm in upholding our national unity," he said.

    Kadeer, a former businesswoman who was jailed in China from 1999 to 2005 and now lives in exile in a suburb of Washington, called on China to allow the Uighur people "self-determination."

    She said her people now wanted autonomy and would decide later on whether to seek full independence.

    "We will talk about this point when China sits at the table for negotiations. We will see how Chinese people give us human rights and freedom for the Uighurs, and then we will decide on this."

    For now, Kadeer said, "the Chinese government should grant us autonomous rule, but there is no autonomous regime allowed in Xinjiang.

    "So they destroyed our nation, our economy, education, religion, rights of free speech and publishing, and they arrested many Uighurs and sent them to jail."
     

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